Ever had a KB?

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by Billy_Ray, Jan 29, 2010.

  1. Billy_Ray

    Billy_Ray

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    After shooting my first reloads yesterday I was wondering how many reloaders have experienced a KB with their reloads. So have you or someone you know experienced a KB with reloaded ammunition?

    By the way my local range has a picture up of a broken gun supposedly caused by reloads.

    Just wondering,
    Billy Ray
     
  2. dudel

    dudel

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    It does happen, both with reloads and factory rounds. Sometimes it's the reloads that are bad; other times it's the gun.

    Just keep in mind that you are setting off an explosion an inch or two from your hand. Read up, go slow, be careful, pay attention to the details, and you should be good to go.

    No time for "Bubba, hold ma beer and watch this..."

    Pay attention to your rounds. If one sounds funny or feels funny - STOP. It could be a squib load. That's fine. It's the next round that starts the party.
     

  3. nam02G

    nam02G First throwing ax bullseye.

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    My Dad blew up his Springfield with a double charge. It was the first shot in a string during a competition so we know it wasn't a squib. I personally had a batch that I ended up pulling the bullets after getting two squibs in a match, turns out the powder measure broke and I didn't notice. Fortunately they barely left the case so the next rounds wouldn't chamber.

    As dudel says, emphasis mine, PAY ATTENTION TO WHAT YOU ARE DOING. With diligence handloaded ammunition is as safe as factory, and can be more accurate since you can customize it to your gun. Don't watch TV or talk to someone or anything else that can distract you.

    The possibility of squibs or double charges is why most people won't shoot ammunition loaded by somebody else.
     
  4. unclebob

    unclebob DFC, MSM, 13 Air Medals.

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    In 49 years of reloading I have never had a KB. I have had one squib round that I new that I was going too have some where in the 200 rds that I had loaded. The reason I had a squib round was because I got distracted when raising the ram, and even ignored the powder check buzzer going off because I thought it was the primer warning buzzer going of. So when I raised the handle the powder check stopped but the primer-warning buzzer started. I also did not visually check too see if there was powder in the case before I put a bullet on the empty case. When I came across a round that would not chamber I new I had a squib round some where in the bag that I had loaded. I was not about too pull 200 rds just too find a squib round I just shot them and new I was going too have one, and was prepared for it.
    I have two friends that had a KB. One was a reload double charge and the other one was factory ammo.
     
  5. DWARREN123

    DWARREN123 Grumpy Old Guy

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    About 10 days ago. Not with reloads but some factory ammo I had from about six months ago. It was the last round in the mag and either Magtech or R-P, not sure which, no brass in the chamber, no pieces of brass in the pistol or near by. Not sure what happened but it sure did scare the heck out of me.
    No damage to me but my hand stung for about 10 minutes.
    Broke the mag catch and blew out the extractor, it is back at Glock now, G23.
    Fairly new gun.
     
  6. fredj338

    fredj338

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    Like most plane crashes, a KB is operator error most of the time. I am knocking on wood, but I have never had a KB in some 200K+ rounds. I have had my share of squibs or bunnyfart loads, where a powder charge was missed or a light charger thrown. If you shoot full power or near full power loads, detecting a squib is pretty easy. Use the correct powder & charge for the bullet/case combo & PAY ATTENTION. A KB should, knock, knock, never happen.:faint:
     
  7. BK63

    BK63

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    My dad had one with a 45 about 30 years ago. He had set the scale wrong and had almost a double charge. Luckily it was a very strong gun and jammed the slide off the rail. Stung but didn't damage him. The good part for me is I remember it well and am extra extremely careful reloading and check and recheck charges all the time.
     
  8. byf43

    byf43 NRA Patron Life Member

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    I've never had a KB or even over-charge, because I'm ANAL about my reloading process/steps. (He says, knocking on wood!)

    I have had ONE squib load, though.
    The cartridge - .30-'06 Springfield. I was shooting the Standing Stage at a High Power Match at my local club.
    I dropped the round into the chamber of my M1 Garand, and closed the bolt.
    When I pulled the trigger, I heard, "Click."
    I waited 1 minute (thinking 'hangfire') before removing the cartridge.
    I pulled the bolt back, and the bullet was still in the case, however, the primer had been detonated!

    I put the cartridge into my shooting bag, and continued the match.
    When I got home, I pulled the bullet, and there was NO powder.

    That instance is why I am so careful, since then.


    The only (reload) KB I've ever personally seen, was a guy at the club, who's Ruger Blackhawk (.357 Magnum) had 'self disassembled' from a double-charge of Hercules Unique.

    The only other KB was from (factory) ammo, in an M1 Garand.
    That wasn't the ammo's fault. It was "Pilot Error".
    The new owner of the Garand came to one of our High Power Matches, with his Winchester M1, and some Winchester 'hunting' ammo.
    On the third shot, the M1 stock shattered and splintered, the op-rod came flying out of the receiver, and was bent.
    Splinters were in that old guy's hands and he turned the same color as a sheet of paper!
    Moral to the story. . . use the proper ammo for the firearm.
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2010
  9. dudel

    dudel

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    Except for down below I bet. :cool:
     
  10. byf43

    byf43 NRA Patron Life Member

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    :rofl:
     
  11. kshutt

    kshutt

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    I realize a lot of factors play into the "exploding" gun issue; however, in 25+ years of reloading I've never experienced it.

    I believe it's essential to be a perfectionist as a reloader. I've been loading on a Dillon RL550B for years, but I never get in a hurry to see how many rounds I can crank out in an hour. I take frequent measurements to monitor the OAL, and powder charge weight. I also have a gooseneck light on my bench positioned over station 3; the seating die. Why? I really focus a lot of attention on the case after it's been charged with powder, and BEFORE I place a bullet on top.

    The additional light source provides an invaluable tool for me to monitor the powder charge! If the charge doesn't look the same case after case, I remove it and weigh the charge just to be sure. I also purposely double-charge a case occasionally when experimenting with a new load, just to see what it looks like in the case.

    I've never had a single incidence of my Dillon dropping a dangerous level of powder, but as a retired production supervisor, I still understand the importance of the QA department! :cool:
     
  12. Zombie Steve

    Zombie Steve Decap Pin Killa

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    I haven't been doing it nearly as long as some of these fellas, but no Kb!'s yet, and no squibs yet.


    <---knocking on wood.
     
  13. Gunnut 45/454

    Gunnut 45/454

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    Had a case head seperate on a reload in 45 ACP ! Not a bad load just a bad case! Just missed it turned out to be a very old case! No injury just had to find all the pieces and put the Ruger P90 back together and kept on shooting!:supergrin:
     
  14. JesseCJC

    JesseCJC

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    In my short loading experience, 1 year, I am lucky that so far the worst mistake I have made was using magnum small pistol primers instead of regular small pistol. I have however had a friends HK 40 get extremely damaged from a factory KB. I am unsure what the manufacture was off the top of my head though
     
  15. DEADLYACCURATE

    DEADLYACCURATE Senior Member

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  16. shotgunred

    shotgunred local trouble maker

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    Yep!

    American Eagle Ammo.
     
  17. mteagle1

    mteagle1

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    I had a case blow out at the feed ramp on a 1911 using Rainier 200gr SWC. I had several that failed to feed sticking on the feed ramp and I just moved them up until they fed. I only had 25 that I loaded and I was too stubborn to unload the mag and I finally had a weak case that allowed the bullet to set back and speed unload. Shooting Star mag found the spring and mag body but not the follower. Five years later discovered a crack in the barrel foot by the link. Had a squib that could have been bad if any of the next 3 rounds had chambered. Yep took 3 rounds to identify a problem in competition.
     
  18. Big Wes

    Big Wes

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    I blew up a G30 about 5 years ago with a reload I had made. Case Head Seperation was the culprit, i.e. weak brass, loaded once to often I guess. It wasn't fun to say the least. :wow:
     
  19. jaybirdjtt

    jaybirdjtt

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    Not a big deal. Winchester primers swing both ways. Threads on this subject generally suggest maybe lowering the charge slightly and looking for signs of excessive pressure. However, on some cartridges, when using certain powders, you want to be sure to use magnum primers only to insure proper ignition.

    Also, never had a KB in 48 years but I am very methodical and follow procedures. Typically, I'll get the brass grunt work out of the way, inspected, cleaned, trimmed if needed, primed and set aside in sealed jars. I use a single stage press and will load 50, inspect powder levels, weigh at least one on the scale to verify the measure is throwing consistently and then proceed to seat bullets. Slow, but I'm not into rpm's. Kind of enjoy the process.
     
  20. sourdough44

    sourdough44

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    No KB in about 30 yrs of reloading, there's always tomorrow.