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Ever Been Lost???

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by FullClip, Aug 11, 2004.

  1. FullClip

    FullClip NRA Benefactor CLM

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    Have you ever been lost or "turned around" while in the woods. Not just a momentary thing, but long enough where you had to think about things for a little bit, or spend the night??
    I've followed some short cuts and paths that didn't quite work out as planned and have had to go cross country to make up for lost time to get out before dark. Getting off the trails and into the brush can be some real tough going and get you into even more problems. Once even got a little worried when I was fishing, as the bridge that I knew was downstream wasn't as close as I thought it was. Common sense told me to keep following the river, but gave some serious thought about back tracking to where I'd started.
    Do you carry a compass, matches and a little "survival kit" even on short excursions in the woods??
     
  2. noway

    noway

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    Hell yeah.

    Now I have a GPS and always carry a compass. In my new homeland ( FL ) and on public trails or hunt grounds, it kinda impossible to get lost or turn around on 4-6k acres tracts to the point that you have to spend a night, But once out west in NM , I nearly became late evening news story, where I got lost , turned around and every foot path looked like each other. In one big word, I walk around in a big circle for about 4hrs late into the night before I figured out what was north using the polaris star and the big dipper.


    Still took me about 2 hrs to get back in a general area and another 1hr to get to the vehicle. And yes I was scared. ;f
     

  3. Ripper_1394

    Ripper_1394 Need a Ride?

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    Doesn't Everyone!?! I think anyone that has spent anytime in the woods has gotten that sinking feeling down in their belly, at least once or twice. That unsure feeling, where you have to double check your bearings.

    I never go wandering in the woods without at least a compass, glock, zippo, flashlight, and water. Up here in Maine, if you get turned around, you could be walking for an awful long time.
     
  4. Ripper_1394

    Ripper_1394 Need a Ride?

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    Come to think of it, the last time I was lost was in the city. Too many one way roads and such.
     
  5. mpol777

    mpol777 Feral Member

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    Out here in the low desert it's kinds of hard to get really lost. Though some folks manage to. Visibility is 70+ miles some days and there's mountains dotted around the landscape. I can usually find my way around just by dead reckoning, but the GPS makes it a lot easier to find my tan colored truck in all that desert scrub.

    I've had that lost feeling a couple times. I've never gotten into a spot where I was really scared about it, but it's a bad feeling nonetheless.
     
  6. Leigh

    Leigh

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    Yes, while hunting....more turned around than anything else.
    As for a survival kit, I think EVERYONE travelling off the beaten path should carry some essential gear...knife/matches/lighter/tinder/whistle/etc.
    I have been tinkering with survival stuff for many years and finally realized that sometimes less is more. I carry a the smallest sized clear OtterBox filled with just enough stuff to keep me relatively comfortable if stuck in the boonies for a day or so.
     
  7. Elk-ruser

    Elk-ruser EMT-B IV

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    Been there, done that, not gonna do it again.

    In the high country of CO, you gotta be prepared.
    In my pack at all times:
    Glock 29
    Fire starter kit
    small first aid kit
    small Signal flare
    signal mirror thingy
    extra layer of clothes. Usually just rain gear but that can be a lifesaver. In september, it can get pretty cool at night.
    Water purifying tablets
    CLIFF bar or two
    Rino GPS
    MAP
    Compass
    Recently I've also started carrying a drink mix caled Emer'gen-C. It a small package with lots of vitamins and such. A great picker-upper.

    All that's just a couple of pounds, but you'd be a happy camper if you gotta spend the night.

    Erik
     
  8. vafish

    vafish

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    As Danile Boone once said:

    "I've never been lost, but I was once bewildered for several days."
     
  9. G. Gunman

    G. Gunman Draw Varmint!

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    ;P Yes, in the White Mountains in New Hampshire. The temperature was about -30 below! It was the one day that I left my backpack in camp – No space blanket, signal mirror, energy bars, first aid kit, flashlight, extra ammo, matches, or flares! (The weather was cold; and we were only going to hunt for a couple of hours that morning.)

    What did I learn? First, ALWAYS, ALWAYS, ALWAYS, take an initial reference point AND CHECK IT! Never believe that stupid SOB who tells you it’s easy; and you can’t possibly get lost. (He’ll be one of the first people back to the cabin asking; ‘Where’s John?’ ‘He was hunting down the South side; he should be back by now!’ When you do get lost, don’t panic. Go high and look around. Carry a topo map of the area you’re hunting in; however, don’t put too much faith in that map you’re using because it’s highly likely that it’s outdated. Newly cut roads will suddenly appear and old ones will be grown over. The reality you’re looking at will often appear to be different from what the map shows you.

    Trust your compass more than your map. Any road is better than no road. Streams and valleys between mountains (passes) tend to lead back to people. When all else fails, go high, wait for dark and scan for lights. Take a compass bearing on them, and estimate the respective angles and distance. If you’ve got any kind of road or negotiable trail to use, you can start walking out. If the ground is slippery or rough, build a fire, fix the reference points on your map as well as in your mind and wait until dawn to start back. As you travel between mountains, stop and listen carefully: Mountains can funnel sound and you may be able to hear sounds of civilization.

    Nowadays, you’ve got GPS units and cell phones to fall back on; but, its been my general experience, that you often need to climb up high in order to get a cell phone to work. Keep your phone turned off when you’re not using it, and an extra battery pack is always a good idea. Remember that batteries don’t last long in cold weather. Don’t put all your faith in electronic gadgets that may or may not work. As far as I’m concerned, there’s still no substitute for woodcraft and hardcopy! If you’re really, really, lost: Stop moving, go high, prepare a bonfire, find a windbreak and wait for help to appear. ;)
     
  10. LovemyGlock's

    LovemyGlock's

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    Going high is great, I grew up in MN in the SE part, if you were not sure where you were just climb the nearest ridge and take a look. Now the USAF has me in southern MS and let me tell you, there is no high points in the swamps, and in the dense fog which usually occurs during duck season here everything dang near looks the same. I had to double check myself last year while going to a pond I have hunted several times. My buddie and I were walking in and it is normally about a 20 min walk through the woods, but we had two problems that morning, fog so thick visibility with my Streamlight was about five feet and the water had risen during the night due to rain and tidal flow covering the forest floor. I turned to soon and we spent near 20 min while I knew we had missed the pond. Got lucky a stumbled across a downed tree on the edge of the pond I recignized and still got set up before the birds were on us, good thing we were alittle early getting in the woods that morning! Bought a GPS this spring. I have always carried a compass and enough supplies to get by for at least 24 hrs, still do, don't trust batteries.
     
  11. allhowl

    allhowl

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    Every time you get lost you learn more about what to do. I'm no expert but I've been "turned around" several times and every tree looked like the last one. If you are prepared and "must" spend the night then its not too bad, but if you aren't prepared it can be a very long night. Plan for the worst and know how to use what you have. You should practice in bad weather to build a fire and keep it burning even in rainy, windy weather. This practice and preperation builds confidence and helps calm you. BE PREPARED & BE CAREFUL!;f
     
  12. jtshombre

    jtshombre

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    Oh yea, not for any great length of time tho, thank goodness. Jumped outta my truck one foggy day to check some coulees for deer, next thing you know I'm several coulees over from my truck and can't see 50 feet in any direction. I wandered around until I found a fence, and started following a fence, found a corner, and sorta figured out where I was, and eventually found my truck. It was about an hour, and not a feeling I enjoyed!! ;Q Smartened me up tho about hunting in the fog! BTW, didn't get a deer that day either. Take care
     
  13. Dogbite

    Dogbite DNT TREAD ON ME

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    I was lost one time while hunting/scouting for about 30 minutes.I was able to figure out where i went wrong by calming down,and backtracking untill i found my error.I realized i was on the wrong path when i noticed a spider web across the trail,and since it was unbroken,i knew i was not headed back the way i had come.This is a great lesson--be aware of detail in the outdoors!!! Thank God i noticed that web.
     
  14. Rabon

    Rabon

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    Being lost is a state of mind, I've never been in much of a hurry.;)