Ethics in Gun Sales

Discussion in 'General Firearms Forum' started by Shark1007, Apr 29, 2012.

  1. Shark1007

    Shark1007

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    Tought I'd pose this to the group. I just bought a low round count non Glock. Obviously it has an issue that can be remedied by the factory that I discovered after 100 rounds.

    Further, it's clear that the prior owner had trouble, traded or sold to a dealer and it was put on Gunbroker, probably to sell to a distant purchaser.

    I have a problem with this sort of thing, I'm not suggesting that it's like a homewner's disclosure, but if a weapon doesn't work correctly, I feel morally it should not be traded or sold to a gunshop when you know they won't really check the gun out, but just sell it to some poor jasper who might choose to defend his family with a gun that stovepipes or jams or worse.

    What says the group? It's always been an interesting debate to me, bucks versus integrity. Guess what usually wins? ​
     
  2. steve581581

    steve581581

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    Never knowingly sell something that is broken. Karma will always win in the long run.
     

  3. byf43

    byf43 NRA Patron Life Member

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    Unfortunately, a lot of gunshops don't know or want to know what is 'wrong' with a ___________ that someone brings in, to trade.

    Around here, gunshops (there are only a few remaining, locally) will give about 50% of what a firearm costs new, and will sell it for 75%.
    Of course, the gunshop wants RETAIL for their wares.

    It sure would be nice (and ethical) if every gunshop had a competent gunsmith go over every firearm brought in, on trade.

    I used to give a lot of my business to a gunshop in District Heights, MD, that did exactly that. Unfortunately, the owner (and good friend) passed away about a year ago.
    I've not even been back to the shop to see if someone else is there.
    :dunno:
     
  4. hogfish

    hogfish Señor Member

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    Gun owners, GT members, etc., are as crooked as everybody else. A few years ago there was a thread along these same lines, and some P.O.S. posted that he had a (IIRC) 1911 which he discovered had a safety issue (as in you could be seriously hurt when you tried to fire it), and went ahead and sold it w/o informing the other party of the danger potential.
    Not right at all. :shame:
     
  5. gocubs6

    gocubs6

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    Ethics are ethics. Special ethics do not exist (business ethics, gun ethics, etc.). You either are honest or you are not. You either treat people as you want to be treated or you don't. The situation or place or circumstance is irrelevant. One should be completely honest and not let money or anything else drive their motivation.
     
  6. ChicagoZman

    ChicagoZman

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    Recently discovered two used guns on the wall in the shop which were subject to a recall. Took them off the wall and will be sending them in to the factory for repair.

    I suspect that the customers that traded or sold these guns to us knew they were having problems, but on inspection they look fine so they got paid a good price.

    The irony is that that the original owners could have had the guns fixed by the factory for free but instead chose to sell them to us at wholesale.
     
  7. craig19

    craig19

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    I think that's why a lot folks only buy new guns. I am not one of those individuals. When I buy a used gun, I realize there maybe a reason the orginal owner dumped it. Especially, if its a "newer" gun, that makes me really wonder what's wrong with it?
     
  8. ronin.45

    ronin.45

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    I would never sell a faulty gun without disclosing any issues. It would be nice if every shop had a range and could test used guns, but that's just a pipe dream.
     
  9. deputy tom

    deputy tom Gringo Viejo

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    I would inform the potential buyer of any short comings of a particular firearm and adjust the price to reflect repairs.That's just me however, I have been burned a few times in my life by used car salesmen,gun dealers and a few private parties as well. It all evens out in the end.YMMV.tom.:cool:
     
  10. Hour13

    Hour13 Tah-dah!

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    +10 :thumbsup:

    I would never sell a gun that I knew had a problem. What if that "problem" reared it's ugly head the one time the new owner needed it to save his/her life or family???

    Either fix it, or strip it for parts.

    One of the big reasons why I enjoying working at the Mustang shop. My boss is adamant about 3 things.

    "Do no harm"

    "Do the work on every car like it was your own. You do not cut corners on anything."

    "It doesn't matter if it's a stunning showcar, or the ugliest, tackiest, primer bombed bondo-bucket you've ever seen. The the guy who owns it? It's his pride and joy. It's the only Mustang that matters. And it WILL be treated as such."

    We aren't getting rich, but I can look at every car I send out with pride. And that has no price.

    :wavey:
     
  11. Dave.1

    Dave.1

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    I had a S&W .357 revolver that I traded a few years ago.

    I had fired some one else's reloads (my fault) and warped the cylinder. I sent it to S&W and they replaced the cylinder for free. I put 200 rounds thru it to make sure it functioned and it was fine.

    At the time I didn't own an auto pistol so I took that revolver in to trade for a S&W auto. I gave the sales person the documentation of the repair and brought in spent casings to show that they would eject properly. Trying to do the right thing.

    No one cared about the repair, just tossed the S&W letter and shell casings in the trash and wrote up the trade. If I had been dishonest I could have saved the trouble of having the gun repaired and just made the trade.

    To this day I would not buy a used gun from that store. How would I know if it functioned properly?

    Dave
     
  12. Bren

    Bren NRA Life Member

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    No offense to you, but this site sees so many posts from completely untrained newbs, who think they can just pick up a gun and be shooters and any problems are the fault of the gun, that I'd have to know more to comment on the "ethics."

    It would be very typical of Glock Talk that a member bought a perfectly good gun that would run 100% in the hands of shooter, but thinks it must be a mechanical flaw that makes it fail to feed/extract/eject in his hands. After all, anybody can pick up a pistol and shoot it, in the movies.
     
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2012
  13. gatorglockman

    gatorglockman

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    Buying a gun is like buying a car....buyer ALWAYS beware...especially on GB. I do think to Bren's comments above, this is where knowledge pays off or harms you. Ex: Used Sigs (rail wear)....if you are buying unseen...you are taking a chance. I have a friend that owns a shop. Before they take anything in trade, they take the firearm out back and fire it a few times into a bullet stop barrel to check function, etc.....cheap and easy way to figure out is there is a "problem" or not.

    Even the best of the best collectors get burned on occasion. Don't let it sour you on buying used weapons, just learn to be more informed.
     
  14. Stevekozak

    Stevekozak Stepping down to the gin palace

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    :goodpost:
     
  15. Ethereal Killer

    Ethereal Killer

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    For every gun there is a buyer... even if they are broken.

    I have never had any problems selling guns even after disclosing potential issues. Gun owners are surprisingly capable people and many enjoy tinkering. It's always best to disclose problems and not cool to hide them.

    of course this is true of about everything.
     
  16. Shark1007

    Shark1007

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    Bren

    No offense taken. I'm an ex LEO, Ex US Army .45 shooter, MP and Criminal Investigator, attended sniper school at Benning and have been shooting regularly for 45 plus years. The pistol had a defect which would have caused a newbie to say "nevermind" and possibly get rid of the gun. It was an issue with magazine seating that caused failure to feed scenarios.

    Just assume there was something wrong and the owner knew it, I just think integrity demands a little forthrightness, like when I got rid of a Para P12 and told the gun store it would feed nothing but ball. I got a little lesser trade, but at least cleared my conscience.

    The dealer on GB has a good rep, just probably didn't know and now, 150 bucks of ammo later, I'll have to address the issue.
     
  17. Jbar4Ranch

    Jbar4Ranch B-Western Hero Millennium Member

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    There is an outdoors store here that is part of a larger chain, and whenever one of the other stores has a problem gun that has been returned or repaired, it is sent to this store where it is sold with no disclaimer to unsuspecting customers at full retail as a new gun.
     
  18. ponchsox

    ponchsox

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    Prices on used guns are so strong right now it's worth it to spend the extra $50 to $100 to buy new in my opinion. Unless you are buying a rare or hard to find gun, why risk the chance of it being a lemon and you end up spending more to fix it then a new gun?
     
  19. countrygun

    countrygun

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    :perfect10:


    Anything less is a characteristic of politicians. Who wants to be lumped in that category?
     
  20. Bruce M

    Bruce M

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    I agree.


    I have no fear of used gun as long as I can look a them. The few guns I have ever had problems with were new ones.