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Escape artist dog returns home after 1 month X2

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by PrecisionRifleman, Oct 25, 2012.

  1. PrecisionRifleman

    PrecisionRifleman

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    So I have a black and white pitbull that is a true escape artist. She has gotten out and I have found her many times over the 2 years I have had her (since a pup). The weird thing is that she got out about 2 months ago and was gone a month before a vet clinic right up the road calls and found here wandering when they opened first thing in the morning. It was obvious that someone had taken care of her because she was in great shape with a shiny coat.

    So she comes back home and escapes again the first night home (she is a digger). This time she is gone for 2 days before the pound calls me. I decided enough was enough after having had to drive around searching for her many many times over the past 3 months. so I left her at the pound. Another consideration is that I'd hate for my dog to be roaming the neighborhood and for someones dog to get attacked or worse. Plus I have a little boy that is getting into everything and the night that she had come back home she woofed at him in a threatening manner. So that finalized the decision not to pick her up, and honestly was the main deciding factor.

    Anyhow so today (about a month from when she got out of the yard) she shows up at the garage. I mean what are the chances? I'm glad to have her back, but I don't want her around my little boy since he is now at walking age and her behavior when she was last home towards him was suspect. To wrap up I want to keep my dog, but I've got to figure out a way to stop her from digging out. Due to the circumstances I know that I will be kenneling her inside during the day while I am at work (when she always gets out) and while the boy is playing until I figure out a way to secure the fence better to stop the digging. I'm thinking maybe some sort of wire will do the trick if I bury it, but I'd like some suggestions from someone who has had a similar challenge with a dog?

    Note: I live in a 3 bedroom 2 story home, and have a medium size back yard. The fence is wooden, but is not the best fence. It's obvious the owner or builder went cheap. Additionally I have another blue fawn pitbull that is also a female. She grew up from a puppy with my black and white pit (from 1 year old the white dog), and I almost wonder if the younger dog coming into puberty has anything to do with the increase in the escape artist digging out and constantly wanting to get free. This dog has gotten out before as I mentioned, but I was always able to bring her back home without a huge fuss (maybe had to chase her on foot in a good run for a couple of streets/blocks over lol). She mostly acted as if it was a game of chase. Now she gets out and is poof gone. I wish I could understand the behavior a little more. Heck maybe she is just a free spirit? :dunno:
     
  2. TransAm-98

    TransAm-98

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    Make sure the dog has exercise, that's always important. Scold the dog for digging whenever you can . My dogs are smart and obvious, so when I find a hole the perp will immediately put their head down and tail between their legs before i even say anything. they know they are in for a world of ****. It's also very important to create boundaries. So they know where they shouldn't be.


    I have a rescue husky/malamute that was an escape artist before I got her. Now she rarely needs a leash and has a backyard with a 4 ft. fence she can easily clear, but never does.
     

  3. PrecisionRifleman

    PrecisionRifleman

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    Thanks for the suggestion on the exercise. I do agree that I need to exercise her more frequently. She has a high prey drive, and loves to chase small animals when we go hiking. I just need to get her out more consistently, and I hope that will help. Maybe a good daily jog will tone her down some? I'll give that a try.
     
  4. TransAm-98

    TransAm-98

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    We worried about ours at first because she also had a high prey drive. She used to bring us back toads and mice while hiking. Always alive and unhurt oddly enough. Now we have 2 cats and she loves them. Just had to make it clear that they weren't toys. All comes back to boundaries and exercise. She'd never hurt the cats, but if she gets too bored and has too much energy she'll start chasing them.
     
  5. unit1069

    unit1069

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    Give the dog away. A pit bull can turn on anyone in the blink of an eye and you already have evidence of the dog's jealousy over your affection for a helpless rival. Don't be someone who after-the-fact never lives down the recrimination of, "I should have ... ".
     
  6. Drain You

    Drain You NRA member

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  7. Little Joe

    Little Joe

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    This.
     
  8. AK_Stick

    AK_Stick AAAMAD

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    secure some chain link about 2-inches above the bottom of your fence, and bury the rest of it, with a 90* bend, and a minimum of about 1-2 feet of horizontal offset from the fence.


    No more digging out.

    However, it won't fix your issues.
    1. You need to train your dog. Its obviously, poorly/not trained.
    2. You need to do something about your dogs energy. Digging/chewing are classic signs of a dog with excess energy, and no outlet. Either find her a toy/activity she likes, or get her out running and tire her out more often. Taking away her digging outlet, is only going to cause her to switch to something else.


    As for the showing agression towards your son. You have two options. Get rid of the dog, or make sure the dog knows his place. Not because its a pitbull, but because a dog or pretty much any size, is capable of serious injury to a kid.
     
  9. dwalker84

    dwalker84

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    All I can say is wow.

    First off - Pit Bulls were bred to be 'dog' aggressive, and unless specifically trained, or treated cruelly are very unlikely to attack humans. The media has done a great job spinning how aggressive this breed is - Just as they spin their anti-gun web of lies.

    Not long ago, the pitbull was THE american dog, THE american family dog - loved for their intense loyalty, and gentleness towards children.


    What you have here, is a DOG/Animal that sees itself as the alpha - the owner is not properly fulfilling it's needs, and not establishing the humans in the household as the pack leaders.

    Sounds like the the dog is not getting enough exercise and discipline - and has no rules, limitations, or boundaries.

    Dogs should be walked at least once a day - and not to goto the bathroom, a vigorous migration. Make sure you go out the door first, and keep the dog next to you or behind you. Tire the dog out, meet it's NEEDS, and it will not run away, and it will not growl at your child. I highly doubt the dog was being aggressive, instead, correcting your child because it sees itself as the pack leader. If you don't lead, your dog will.


    Pit Bulls are unpredictable and more likely to bite than other dogs - FICTION. Pit Bulls are no more vicious than Golden Retrievers, Beagles or other popular dogs! In a recent study of 122 dog breeds by the American Temperament Testing Society (ATTS), Pit Bulls achieved a passing rate of 83.9%. That's as good or better than Beagles ... 78.2%, and Golden Retrievers ... 83.2%. How did your favorite breed do? See for yourself - go to: www.ATTS.org

    Pit Bulls are good with children - FACT. Pit Bulls always test high as one of the most stable breeds of dogs in the country. These statistics can be found with the American Temperament Test Society of the United States, where they always fall as one of the top five most stable dogs. Because of this, they are extremely patient and tolerant of children.

    All Pit Bulls will "snap" and attack a person sooner or later - FICTION. Pit Bulls are a very popular breed and rarely attack. Pit Bulls are very powerful animals, so when something does go wrong, it usually makes the news. Almost all Pit Bull attacks have involved unaltered Pit Bulls, so it is very important to have your Pit Bull spayed or neutered as soon as possible. Additionally, serious Pit Bull attacks rarely involve spayed/neutered Pit Bulls who have received proper training and socialization.

    Pit Bulls are good for first time dog owners - FICTION. Although this breed is fantastic with people, they can be a challenge. They are extremely strong and athletic dogs and unless the owner is prepared to attend a training program and have a secure and structured living environment, I would not recommend this breed for your first dog.

    Pit Bulls are good dogs for apt./condo living - FACT. Though Pit Bulls are athletic and love to get out and play, if they had their druthers, they would be sleeping on the couch, 24/7. They are short coated dogs and do not do well outside in the cold weather or very hot weather. They don't shed too much and are easily groomed, thus making them the ultimate indoor dog.

    "Red nose" Pit Bulls are more aggressive - FICTION. Are blondes dumb? Do redheads have a quicker temper? Of course not. "Red nose" is simply a color/style. They have a lighter pigment such as a pinkish nose with yellow/green eyes. They act no different than black, brindle, or white Pit Bulls.

    Pit Bulls are easy to train - FACT. Extremely easy to train. All they want to do is please you. As they are so sensitive to your feelings, verbal training comes easily with this breed.

    Pit Bulls cannot be with other dogs and/or cats - FICTION. This is probably the biggest misconception and biggest misunderstanding when it comes to this breed. With proper training and handling, your Pit Bull can learn to live peacefully in the company of other dogs and often cats as well.
     
  10. 2GoneDE

    2GoneDE

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    I am stereotyping you without knowing you....sorry. Why risk your son? Why? Why risk somebody else's family? You don't sound like the most responsible dog owner....why have two if you can't walk one? ugh. I would like to have a pony, but have the common sense to not get one. NO BAD DOGS....BAD OWNERS.
     
  11. aircarver

    aircarver Descent Terminated Silver Member

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    My daughter has a little boxer, who is a dig-out escape artist. To compound that, she gets lost a half a block away, and I have to wait for a call from someone who found her and read the tags, so I can go get her.

    After more than 20 escapes, it got old, so we put in a one wire electric fence, the wire close to the bottom of the fence so digging under is not possible without getting 'bit'.

    This worked. She got so she wouldn't go near the bottom of the fence, and I was able to cease my dawg taxi service.

    .
     
  12. PrecisionRifleman

    PrecisionRifleman

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    I've owned 5 pitbulls and everyone has been the most loyal and obedient dog out breeds I have owned. There are always going to be dogs within any breed that does not do great with kids. Matter of fact the only dogs I have ever had problems with are a Dotson (bite the tip of my finger and almost removed my finger nail), and a black lab that I was able yo avoid getting bit. Matter of fact human aggression completely goes against what the pitbull breed was breed for. They were bred to not have human agression. Population wise pitbulls far out weigh numbers in comparison to other breed. As such the number of bites from these dog should be expected to.be.higher.than other breeds. If you base the.number of bites on a ratio to population pitbulls are far from the moat frequent offender of aggression toward people. The only reason that here are attacks by these animals is because of irresponsible owners who manipulate he great qualities of the pitbull breed for personal gain. Please educate yourself on the topic before making such comments as they will turn on you etc.

    Historically the pithily has been a most revere breed. It was the first bred in our white house, and one of the first.breeze of working dogs used for police work, fire house dog etc. The pitbull reputation of today is solely due to irresponsible owners and breeders.

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  13. PrecisionRifleman

    PrecisionRifleman

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    This sounds like a great solution. I will have to look at installing a hot wire.this weekend. Thank you for the feedback.

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  14. PrecisionRifleman

    PrecisionRifleman

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    Re-read my post. I take my dog hiking, and on jogs. Just not every single day. I do take them on walks daily however. Also m other dog also a pitbull is the biggest baby of a dog I have ever had. She follows me where ever I go. No leash required. She won't run away. Not all dogs are created equally. If you are here to pick a fight go elsewhere. I'm looking for solutions. Not crap talking from a person who obviously knows very little about my bred other than BS you watch on TV. Don't bother posting again, added to the ignore list. Responding to you is a waste of time.

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  15. PrecisionRifleman

    PrecisionRifleman

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    Glad to see someone post who knows about the breed. Honestly I have never had a problem until she ran away for a month the first time. When she came.home the.first.time she.was sort of aloof as though she was acting as if she was a new dog. She didn't really growl at my son, buy it was more of a low woof. However it did concern me. I'm going to take her for a daily jog and see if.this doesn't help. Before she.escaped I was going on jogs with her about three times a week. For my other pit this is plenty as she is more thick/heavy and tires much faster. Actually the one I'm having trouble with I don't seem to be able to run her hard enough to wear her out. Maybe a daily jog and walk will.help. I think another part of the problem is that before I had my son I took her to the dog park frequently, and she.went everywhere with me. Since having my son and starting a family she seems to have a.hard time adjusting to her new role in the family. Which is the bottom of the hierarchy. These are all points that are consistent with the points you have made. I guess she just demanda more from me than the other pits I have owned. Meaning I'm just going to have to work with her to reaffirm her role in a family v.s just me and her like it was.when I was single and she was my sole companion. One last consideration is that my other female pit is an attention hog. So not only has.she had to adjust to a new.family hierarchy, but she now also has to compete with my younger dog for attention. Thanks for the feedback.

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  16. PrecisionRifleman

    PrecisionRifleman

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    I think this is good advice as well. I had considered some sort of linked wiring, but I hadn't put much though into chain linked fencing. I got her out today and ran her with a tennis ball. It's a little easier to run out some gas v.s trying to run it out of her. I'll still take her jogging, and hiking but a wide variety of exercises that she enjoys seems like a good medium. Thanks