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equipment suggestions

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by cajun_chooter, Sep 10, 2012.

  1. cajun_chooter

    cajun_chooter

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    I think i want to get started re-loading.. years ago i use to re-load for hunting purposes... mostly rifle.. i now want to buy a loading press for loading mostly 9mm ammo..
    any suggestion on what brand of press that is most trouble free... easiest to set up.. and where to buy would be most helpful..

    thanks,
     
  2. sellersm

    sellersm disciplinare

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    Read through the stickies at the top of this forum.

    To save time, you may want to tell us the intended volumes you'll need to load, as that determines most of what we'd recommend.

    Welcome to the madness, er sickness, er disease, I mean the rewarding & effective hobby!
     

  3. F106 Fan

    F106 Fan

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    We just did this last week:
    http://glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1441898

    There are some stickies at the top that go over many of the options.

    Before anyone can help in any realistic way, you need to decide (and tell us) how many rounds you plan to shoot, of how many calibers, over what period of time. If you want to shoot 1000 rounds per week, the recommendation will be a lot more expensive than if you want to shoot 1000 rounds per year.

    It would be helpful if we had some idea of your budget. If you only want to spend $300 then the equipment list will be much different than if you want to spend $1200.

    Why would anyone start out at $1200? Ask SARDG, she wanted to shoot competitively and that's what it takes to make dumpster quantities of ammo in a short period of time.

    Most everybody around here has chugged vast quantities of the Blue Kool-Aid and will recommend Dillon equipment. You can spend some time here:
    http://www.dillonprecision.com/#/customize-reloader.html

    You can also get "The ABCs of Reloading" as a beginning book. It is available at Amazon in both a paper version and as an eBook.

    Richard
     
  4. Bucknasty

    Bucknasty

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    It seems like the same questions get asked here everyday. What press to buy, should I lube?, sort brass or mix?, load data? They should make a search function...
     
  5. cajun_chooter

    cajun_chooter

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    I did read thru the stickys ... i don't want a slow press.. but i don't want to spend $1200 either... either a Dillion 550 or a Hornady progressive... i think... i have spent quite a bit of time reading reviews on both.. Dillion & Hornady... i read that hornady had some problems ... but not sure they got that their shortfalls corrected..
    i was hoping i would ask on here with the vast knowledge and experience on reloading to prevent me from buying a press and then selling it for a press i should have bought in the first place..

    thanks,
     
  6. F106 Fan

    F106 Fan

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    Oddly enough, they have! :rofl:

    Richard
     
  7. F106 Fan

    F106 Fan

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    The Dillon 550 is the workhorse of the reloading community. Most everybody around here has at least one (I have 2). Loading around 400 rounds per hour seems realistic. They're great machines.

    There isn't much enthusiasm for Hornady progressives around here. There have been issues. I don't know if there still are.

    Dillon presses are guaranteed forever! Except the 1050 which is more of a commercial machine.

    There is a press configurator at Dillon so you can add in the various options and see how it comes out. Many of the options can be purchased later. Sure, the strongmounts are great and they help elevate the press. But so will a higher bench or a block of wood. The bullet tray is nice because it gets the bullets up where you need them. So will a block of wood! The powder check alarm is nice - especially on FAST machines where powder gets used quickly. OTOH, you can just look at the hopper when you add primers. It worked for YEARS before the alarm was invented. I still don't have roller handles.

    Buy the bare press and the required dies and you are ALMOST good to go. You need a quality scale (don't pay less than $100 for a digital scale). Dillon has quality scales both beam and digital. Beam is good enough unless you plan to trickle charge a LOT of rifle ammo. For pistol ammo, you only check the powder measure every once in a while.

    You need a primer flip tray and some extra primer pickup tubes. You can buy caliber conversions as they come along.

    EDIT: Add a pair of calipers (digital or dial) plus a case gauge (Dillon has them). Eventually, you will want some kind of tumbler. Sure, I'm going to recommend Dillon but there are others. Franklin Arsenal isn't highly regarded around here. Add some Hornady One Shot case lube - highly recommended!


    Richard
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2012
  8. unclebob

    unclebob DFC, MSM, 13 Air Medals.

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    You need to give out a lot more information. Other that just loading 9mm. You came up with the 550. I would take it any day over the LNL. Personally I don’t think they have worked all the bugs out.
     
  9. F106 Fan

    F106 Fan

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    If you buy a 550, it may still not be the last press you buy. But you will probably never want to get rid of it. They are very handy to have around and, since caliber conversions are reasonably priced, it will always see use for odds and ends.

    However, if you got into serious competitive shooting, you might want something faster for a specific caliber. I shoot a lot of .45 ACP. I decided that with 4 of us shooting out of my ammo can that I needed (really, WANTED) a 1050. So, I bought one. We also shoot a bunch of 9mm and .223 and caliber conversions for the 1050 are pricey. So, I bought a 650 for those.

    I load lesser quantities of .38 HBWC and the 550 does a great job for those. But 200 rounds might be a lot so it's hardly worth buying a 650 conversion. It's not worth the time to make the conversion even if I had the parts. I can knock them out in half an hour on the 550.

    Presses seem to multiply like rabbits!

    Richard
     
  10. SBray

    SBray

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    I went the 550 route for my (first) progressive bullet reloader and I have found it to be an excellent selection. Especially since the carousel does not automatically rotate with each operation of the handle. It is nice that the shell stay on the same station when making adjustments. You just got to pay attention and make sure you rotate it after you check powder drops and die settings.

    There have been times I wish I had gotten a 650 but I have three calibers to load for and do not shoot thousands of shells per year, so the 550 works just fine for me.

    Steve
     
  11. unclebob

    unclebob DFC, MSM, 13 Air Medals.

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    It is very easy to make the 650 manual indexing. You can stop primer feed or brass feed.
     
  12. sciolist

    sciolist

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    This is a good source of information on the Dillon stuff, and a good place to buy: http://www.brianenos.com/store/dillon.html

    Sounds like OP probably wants either a 550 or 650, depending on volume. If you have enough time to load at the rate of 300-400 rounds/hour, the 550 is a great press.
     
  13. fredj338

    fredj338

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    I would go 550 because of the versatility. It's about as trouble free as a progressive can be but the priming slide is & will always be an issue, unless the redesign it. Still, a terrific press that will out last you. IT has a sustained rate of 400-500rds/hr if you start with pre loaded primer tubes. Still, takes less than 2min to fill a primer tube.
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2012
  14. sellersm

    sellersm disciplinare

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    I still don't see where you mentioned the desired quantity of reloading and the time you have to spend doing it? Or did I miss it?

    As to where to buy: that's been answered: brian enos' site is the best if you're going to get a Dillon.

    So far we know you don't want slow, but don't want to spend $1200. Those aren't exactly the best requirements to work with... The Lee Classic Cast Turret (as mentioned in the "Kempf kit" in the stickies) isn't exactly slow, and it's nowhere close to $1200!! But will it meet your needs? Who knows? We don't know what your requirements are!
     
  15. PCJim

    PCJim Senior Member

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    You can sometimes find used Dillon presses. They generally sell for 75-80+% of new press prices. When you consider that 10 years from now, you can sell a newly bought press for what you paid for it (unless the administration drives our economy into a serious tailspin), its only time value you've lost on your money.

    I own three 550s, two of which are set up on the bench. One on a strongmount for standing while loading, the other bench mounted for reloading while sitting. Probably have a dozen quick change setups now since I've picked up a few extras. Caliber changes are quick, and there is no die adjustment save maybe for the bullet seater if you decide to use a different bullet.
     
  16. cajun_chooter

    cajun_chooter

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    well, after reading until my eyes hurt.. i think i have narrowed it down to 2... either the Dillion 650 or Hornady 095100 progressive.. there is a considerable difference in price.. if i could find a good used press .. i will consider it

    is the Hornady 095100 a dependable machine ?

    thanks again for the replys.. i hope to avoid a mistake by asking questions IN ADVANCE
     
  17. unclebob

    unclebob DFC, MSM, 13 Air Medals.

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    Between a 650 and LNL with case feeder. There is about 50.00 difference in price. Without a second thought I would get the 650 over the LNL any day. There are a few things on the LNL I like but overall the 650 is the way to go. I would get the 650 even if I didn’t get the case feeder.
     
  18. Colorado4Wheel

    Colorado4Wheel

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    Dillon
    www.Brian Enos.com

    The rest is in the sticky.
     
  19. Rich22

    Rich22

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    I will throw this out there as I made a decision in a similar situation to yours fairly recently. I picked the Hornady LNL AP. I can say I have not had a problem with the press that was not my fault except that Unique does not meter in the powder measure for squat. On the other hand I have had about a metric ton of issues with the Hornady Dies, I have sent two out of three back to the factory for work or replacement. From what I looked at in making my decision I came up that if I wanted to start with a case feeder, the Dillon 650 would have been the best choice and if I did not want to start with one that the LNL AP was the correct choice for me. I believe with the press, dies, scale etc etc my grand total to get started not including components or bench was just over 700.

    Rich
     
  20. F106 Fan

    F106 Fan

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    You probably won't find much enthusiasm for Hornady progressives around here. But you're right, there is a difference between the Hornady and Dillon in terms of cost.

    The 650 is almost useless without the case feeder and by the time you get a 650 fully loaded, it will cost $1000. I know whereof I speak (or type) as I bought one a few months ago. Fully loaded from BrianEnos.com - I saved about $30 on shipping by ordering from Brian.

    It IS possible to drop shells into the feed tube on the 650 and delay buying the case feeder and it is also possible to add a case feeder to the LnL AP.

    Are you sure you need to load around 1000 rounds per hour? I'm not suggesting that there is no need because I have a 650 and I also have a 1050 for .45 ACP.

    Bare machine against bare machne, the Dillon is $150 more expensive. In both cases, the bare machine will work but it is a waste of a perfectly fine 650 to run it that way. And if I had the LnL, I would certainly be adding a case feeder.

    Of the 650 owners on this forum (and there are several) I have yet to see even one bad comment.

    I don't own a LnL but I thought about buying one a while back. I'm glad I spent the extra money for the 650 because I only spent it once!

    Richard