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English Setter for family/hunting dog.

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by Dogbite, Sep 19, 2004.

  1. Dogbite

    Dogbite DNT TREAD ON ME

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    I have a chance to get an English Setter from a guy at a good price--dog is an established hunting dog.I would like to know if anybody has owned one or hunted over one.If so,could you please tell me what they are like as a family/hunting dog.Thank you very much!!
     
  2. skfullgun

    skfullgun

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    I had Gus for a number of years. He was high-strung, but a loyal and loving dog. My experience is probably not typical, but Gus never got past bringing me one bird and then eating the next. He would chase armadillos and deer no matter what I did. When I travelled, I carried a 5-gallon bucket full of concrete with a chain sticking out of it. I would hook Gud to it as a portable stake-out. He would drag the bucket (Weighing about 60 pounds) around like it was cup of coffee!

    As I said, he was a great, loving companion, but he loved to run. That's eventually the way I lost him, he ran from me while hunting and despite months of looking for him he never returned.

    All that said, I would own another English Setter if I had a large enough yard.
     

  3. rfb45colt

    rfb45colt safe-cracker

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    Between my dad & I, we've owned 8 setters. I've had 4 females and 1 male. My dad had 3 males. The females were less prone to be big runners, were easier to train, and were better to have around the house (they never lifted their leg on any furniture, nor did any chewing).

    The 1 male I had was a dog I found running loose in the woods. He was a great hunter and pointer, but he had a mind of his own. He never did comprehend that pointing birds a half mile away from the gun was useless... and I'd spend more time hunting for him, than hunting for birds (I guess that's why I found him running free... never could find his original owner). But I kept him because he was fantastic with my two young daughters... the younger one (8 yrs old at the time) even taught him to pull a sled through the snow, with her in it. He was excellant around the house, very protective of my kids, and was a good watch dog.

    The females I had always stayed within gun range. Great noses, great pointers, but only so-so at retrieving. Don't misconstrue the retrieving comment... they'd retrieve grouse or quail without a hitch, but pheasants were a differant story for some reason. Any pheasant that was knocked from the sky was found by them, but they sometimes would just stand over it, and wait for me to come get it.... but they never lost a wounded or dead bird.

    As I now do mostly waterfowl hunting, I have switched to Labs... but if I did more upland hunting than waterfowl, the Setter (a female) would be my 1st choice, no question.

    Edit: BTW... field strain English Setters (and English Pointers) are mostly registered with F.D.S.B. (Field Dog Stud Book) rather than A.K.C. There are two "sub-strains" of English Setters... commonly known as "Lewellan" (sp?) and "Lavarack". The Lewellans tend to be smaller, less stocky, more agile, and have shorter hair.... and are the type most commonly used for field trials, hunting, etc. They are bred strictly for their hunting abilty, not looks. The Setters commonly seen in dog shows are generally the "Lavarack" type... they tend to be larger, with longer hair. They are mainly bred for looks and conformation, not hunting ability. Not that some aren't good hunters... it's just that hunting ability is not normally the goal of the breeder.
     
  4. Dogbite

    Dogbite DNT TREAD ON ME

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    Thanks for your information guys!!
     
  5. striderglock

    striderglock HVACR

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    My dad and I have/had Pointers and they were fantastic with kids and in the house.

    The females are defenitely easier with everything, no matter the breed.
     
  6. Hunterjbb

    Hunterjbb

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    a memory.. Mad dad got a pup from a pair of Field champion setters, male, cute little thing, seemed very very good with his nose, healthy, not gun shy, everything seemed great.. but.. He was a total idiot... :) and talk about a mind of his own and high strung WOW.... he was pretty good around the house surprisingly, tore hell out of my dads hardwood floors though running around.. ;P

    great nose though.. dam shame we could never get him to work very well.. loved to just ZOOM.. and take off once he got a scent..

    Then one faithful night he and the neighbors dog got loose, neighbor had a doby/wolf mix nasty watch dog.. so they went and killed three sheep and 25 chickens at the neighbors farm.. oops.. came home just bloody as all get out.. Couple of days later he bit my older brother perty good.. end of story.. my dad put him down..

    I can think of better dogs to have around, German short hairs are very nice dogs.. Labs.. make better house dogs then setters..
    but if you have the room and want to penn them that might work out ok.

    good luck.

    Jeff.
     
  7. Dogbite

    Dogbite DNT TREAD ON ME

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    You guys are great--thanks for the info.With the knowledge i have gained from all the replies i have decided against getting an english setter.I might get a lab for a hunting/family dog.