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EMT-B plans

Discussion in 'Firefighter/EMS Talk' started by Lynn D, May 30, 2006.

  1. Lynn D

    Lynn D Bullseye?

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    What bullseye?
    I decided, after many years of consideration, to pursue my EMT-B. I'm currently RN in ED Boarding Unit. I'll join a local vollie corps and work for them/get training in return.

    Any words of wisdom????

    Thanks all.

    Lynn
     
  2. lexmedic157

    lexmedic157 Citizen

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    Don't use your RN to make yourself sound better than any other vollie there. You may be very good at your job at the hospital, but when you get in an ambulance it's a totally different environment, try to learn from the EMTs. They'll appreciate your experience, but want an equal not a dictator.
     

  3. lexmedic157

    lexmedic157 Citizen

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    I apologize if it sounds harsh, but ask (I'm sure some will answer) other medics as we have worked with many RN's (as I'm sure you've worked with a lot of medics). Many RN's try and run over medics in the field using their "RN" as a "I'm better than you" statement. Like I said RN's do very well in their controlled (usually) hospital environment, medics have to get them to you, and a lot of times that's harder than caring for them at the hospital. I guess I'm just trying to say is that you will learn a bunch in the field if you'll let yourself. And maybe you'll also learn that not all medics are a&&holes. :supergrin:
     
  4. Lynn D

    Lynn D Bullseye?

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    10-4 on that sir. Already received that advice from some medic friends. Don't think I'll have trouble "holding back"....Only been RN 2 years....don't know everything yet! Also, more than willing to learn the field stuff, as it will give me new skills to learn back "inside" the ED.

    I've essentially been told to "not mention" my RN unless directly asked. Unfortunately, many medics know me by sight, so I'll be "made" quickly.

    Oh well. I'll take the lumps. Think it will be just fine.

    Lynn
     
  5. Lynn D

    Lynn D Bullseye?

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    What bullseye?
    Haven't yet met any that qualify as "anal egress points"....Even dated one once.

    Guess what I mean is, I'm pretty easy going to get along with.

    Lynn
     
  6. lexmedic157

    lexmedic157 Citizen

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    I feel that your RN will be of great benefit to you, your crew, and your patients. But unfortunately too many impose the title. At least when you're taking EMT class you'll already know how to do basic pt assessments, etc. I have taken many ER nurses into the field helped them see what happens before the pt arrives, and taught them how to do their job on the fly. Many are very greatful as at least they've seen what we actually do, and that we're not just "ambulance drivers."
     
  7. ShotGlass

    ShotGlass

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    I would actually recommend avoiding the all volly corps and get in with a mostly career department, the level of expertise is much better and in general, you avoid the wackers. Get yourself to a paid department...you wouldn't get your nursing training from a volly collefge or a volly hospital; would you?
     
  8. Lynn D

    Lynn D Bullseye?

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    I agree with you....My goal is to improve my nursing skill by being involved in pre-hospital care, and improve my pre-hospital care by being a nurse. One of our techs is an EMT-B and she said that's why she does both....because she can learn and apply the info.

    Lynn
     
  9. akulahawk

    akulahawk

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    As a Paramedic, I must applaud you for taking the "long" way to becoming an EMT. Many states allow "advanced" providers to simply challenge the EMT or Paramedic exams and get certified or licensed that way. I have seen RN's that do VERY well in the hospital but are absolutely worthless in the field. In many cases, it was NOT because they aren't knowledeable in patient care, it was purely because they had never been trained HOW to work in the field.

    You probably have all the basic stuff (patient assessment wise) you will ever need. Being an EMT means learning to do patient assessments without the benefit of all the monitors and such you have in the ED or in an ALS unit, all while in some very uncontrolled environments. It also means learning to trust your training and instincts. I worked as an EMT for a long time. Then I became a Paramedic... worked ALS and went back to BLS for a number of years. Best thing I have ever done. I got away from being dependent upon my monitors and back to working with my senses. It is a very different thing being a Paramedic working BLS. You have advanced knowledge and apply it as BLS. I also never gave my fellow BLS employees any $h!t because I was a Paramedic. Instead, I worked to improve my partner's abilities as an EMT. In effect, I ended up being a mentor of sorts to my fellow employees.

    Right now, I work in a non-medical job and am going back to school (I have a BS in Sports Med) to become a Nurse. I feel that the experience I'll gain from being an RN will only help me as a Paramedic and vice-versa. Ultimately, my goal is to be a CCT RN or Flight RN. We'll see where this new career takes me. I have a long road ahead of me - about 3 years or so, (to get the RN) but it'll be worth it in the end.
     
  10. Lynn D

    Lynn D Bullseye?

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    I, too, have a degree in Sports Med (BS, MS - Athletic Training)....

    It took some doing to get me to nursing. Should have done it long ago.

    Long ago, wanted to do EMS. Couldn't because of finances, time, etc. Now I can. I don't see the need to take the "accelerated" route to EMS just because I can. Though I don't think we have a program like that here just yet.

    Since I work in an ED (but really function in a "floor nurse" capacity), I'm looking forward to the EMS way of thinking. With your senses, as you mentioned. I like the idea of sort of "flying by the seat of my pants" when trying to problems solve/treat the patient. And I'm going to be looking to my more experienced co-workers for wisdom...much as I would in any field.

    Thanks for the good words and advice.

    Lynn
     
  11. RLDS45S

    RLDS45S

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    Having risen through the ranks so to speak, I can assure the poster that said to stay away from Volunter EMS agencies is off the mark. Most provide better care then some over worked and under paid services. I have seen juniors and seniors in HS run a BLS code better then some medics running ALS codes. So that sir comes from the person not the Alphabet soup of letters behind a person's name (most of which do not mean diddly squat as they do not certify competence, they certify you were there) There are two things that allow providers to do interventions, Medical Director and the state EMS agency. Justa case in point, we have ER Tech that is taking ACLS class, and while I admire people pursuing their education, the guy can not read ECG's! So why take a spot in a class where that is the baseline for the class? Anyone who has seen ACLS change can attest to that. Hell, if someone was not crying at ACLS way back when someone was not doing their job,but now were have the kindler/gentler ACLS training! And, I whole heartedly agree a little knowledge becomes a dangerous thing! All providers of health care have to have one thing first, common sense! After that it is easy, but there is a learning curve. I have been doing this for 25 years. I am now charge nurse in a suburban ER. But, I will always think like a paramedic, practical vs. intelectual. We had a RN that could not take care of her section in the ER, and she was prehospital provider on her off hrs. I always wondered about how that worked out.
     
  12. DScottHewitt

    DScottHewitt EMT-B

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    +1,000,000,000,000,000


    Scott


    :alien:
     
  13. akulahawk

    akulahawk

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    I won't touch the "vollie vs. career" thing here. That really has no bearing on this at all. My advice is simple. Seek out good training from good people. Period. Everything else is immaterial. If you want to get good experience, work with people that do it right consistently and have the DRIVE to do it right.

    Early in my EMT career,I was fortunate to work for a small BLS company that focused primarily on doing things the right way, rather than the most expedient way. We'd built a reputation for being excellent EMT's in our county, even though we were paid just above minimum wage. We WANTED to be better than we were, even though we were VERY good.

    That's the kind of group you want to work with, regardless if it's volunteer OR career.
     
  14. akulahawk

    akulahawk

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    I could not agree more with these statements. :thumbsup:

    And some medics, well... - you just remember THEM all week... :shocked:
     
  15. thomas15

    thomas15

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    I'm a volunteer fire fighter and we assist a paid ambulance company and I know both volly and paid EMTs. The above statement is correct in my opinion. I know volly EMTs that are totally professional and paid that are total wackers. It really all just depends. But my feeling is that no matter what the oldsters are going to give you jazz no matter what so just do your own thing, take their critisisms with a smile and be the best you can, the hell with what they say.

    The EMTs in this area are not paid enough so why anyone would do it for a living is a mystery to me. Just about every flight nurse I have seen is a god wanabe, but then again, I'm a volunteer fire fighter and do this as a hobby so I don't care what anyone says or thinks about me.

    Tom
     
  16. thomas15

    thomas15

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    sorry for the double
     
  17. akulahawk

    akulahawk

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    Most EMT's I know are paid nowhere NEAR enough. I do it for the same reason many people do - it's FUN. As far as the "god wannabe" thing goes, I have seen it in MANY kinds of RN's (and other people too :supergrin: ).

    I've seen the "god complex" in MD's, RN's, (Rarely in PA's), Paramedics, and EMT's, just to name a few. In my experience, this is the exception to the rule. I've seen enough "ParaGods" though to understand where that term came from...

    I know what I know. I do what I am trained to do to the best of my ability. This is what I do.

    I've never been "paid enough", yet I keep going back for more, no matter how :freak: things get.