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Embarrassing issue: bruised Glock trigger finger?

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by GlockinNJ, May 22, 2011.

  1. GlockinNJ

    GlockinNJ

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    OK, here goes: I got my G22 about a month ago and have put about 1,000 rounds through it so far - shooting a couple hundred rounds a week. The morning after my last range outing, I woke up with a sore bump on my trigger finger. It's on the bottom of my trigger finger tip, pretty much right where the pad of my finger rests on the trigger. It feels like a bone bruise, since it's sore deep into the tissue, not on the surface.

    It's been over a week since I shot and it really hasn't healed. I've dry fired a little, but not much. The thing is, it doesn't hurt when I pull the trigger, so I don't really know if it's related to the Glock or not - though I can't imagine what else caused it and why it's not healing.

    So, go ahead and crack jokes, I know that my trigger finger boo-boo is funny.

    But, if anyone else has experienced this, please let me know.
     
  2. SCC

    SCC just me

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    Drink more milk :whistling:
     

  3. Glock 17L

    Glock 17L *GLOCKAHOLIC*

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    You can always sand the safety in the middle of the trigger down just till it's flush when depressed & it will keep it from poking your finger as much.. The safety will still work 100%
    I've done this on every Glock I've ever had..
    Better to remove the trigger bar & lodge it forward with a tooth pick & match the profile & test often.
    Here's a picture of my G26 that's had this Modificaton..
    Also NOTE: Smoothed Faced G17 Trigger as well..

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2011
  4. texas 48

    texas 48 Gold Member

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    It's the trigger causing your finger issue. I have had blood blisters on my trigger finger until it calused up. I have attempted to contour the safety but I feel that compromises the safety. Heavy loadsand high volume of rounds can cause this condition. Hope u find a solution.
     
  5. beancounter81

    beancounter81

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    Sounds like you have Glock Finger. Tough it out and keep firing - use a band-aid if you have to - eventually you build up a callus.
     
  6. Sonnytoo

    Sonnytoo

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    IMO, it's NOT the trigger. It's the trigger-guard, the bottom of it "below" the trigger-tip. Take a look at two blisters; one next to the nail, where the fingertip "rides" on the triggerguard bottom. The blisters are NOT on the part of the fingertip that contacts the trigger.

    [​IMG]

    Here's a portion of an email that I sent to one of my sons.

    Referring to a YouTube instructional video on gripping the gun.

    "Did you notice how his trigger-finger (referring to a video)
    angles downward into the trigger-guard
    ? Mine does that too, probably
    because I get my hand up as high as possible on the grip. When I shoot my .45 G36, my triggerfinger tip actually rubs the bottom of the triggerguard
    as I press the trigger, and sometimes I get bloodblisters on my fingertip.
    On the 9's, it doesn't bother me.
    The other thing is that when shooting, they require that you keep your
    triggerfinger outside of the triggerguard until the buzzer sounds.
    Unfortunately, my triggerfinger is so long that I have trouble (takes time)
    to pull my finger back far enough to get it inside of the triggerguard and
    onto the trigger. The nice thing is that it gives me an excuse."

    So anyway, if shooting a 9mm doesn't give you blisters...and your G22 does, then you know you have long fingers. :)
    I have toyed with the idea of "relieving" a small portion of the upper part of the trigger-guard so that I can get my darned finger into it without relaxing my grip, and relieving the bottom of the triggerguard a bit to give my fingertip a break.
    You and I might just be the only weirdos on this forum. Well, I see that Texas 48 is aware of this also. And he's right that you have to be careful not to compromise the safety of the firearm. I suppose I could have a finger reduction done at the surgeon's.
    Sonny
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2011
  7. tuf8seconds

    tuf8seconds TEXAS COWBOY

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    Sounds like you need a single action to me!!!!
     
  8. Sonnytoo

    Sonnytoo

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    If GSSF allowed them, I'd use 'em. I got 'em.

    "former" Texan
    Sonny
     
  9. barstoolguru

    barstoolguru texas proud

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    Ooooooo he's got an owwweeee...............lmfao...... do you need some one to kiss it
     
  10. GlockinNJ

    GlockinNJ

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    "So, go ahead and crack jokes, I know that my trigger finger boo-boo is funny."


    Well, that took about 8 posts. :upeyes: A little longer than I expected.
     
  11. Bren

    Bren NRA Life Member

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    Your grip should be as high as possible - if your trigger finger wants to rub the bottom of the guard, that makes me thing you either have really gigantic fingers or you are gripping too low with your strong hand.
     
  12. ModGlock17

    ModGlock17

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    Use athletic tape, just like ball players. $3 roll at drug stores, walmart, targets.

    It slides better against the guard, than skin.
     
  13. English

    English

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    Hands vary a lot but it is quite common for the "top" of the trigger finger to rub against the underside of the frame between the joints and the "bottom" (the right side of the tip if you are right handed) to rub against the trigger guard. The right hand side of the trigger finger tip can then get pinched between the end of the trigger and the trigger guard. If the end of the trigger is pointed, as it often is, it will produced a blister. The so called trigger safety is narrow and often sharp as well. Usually it doe not go flush with the trigger when you pull the trigger and so that too can cause tenderness or blistering.

    As the slide returns from recoil it picks up the firing pin lug and semi cocks the pistol. This is not a great force but it is sudden and it might push the trigger, and your finger forwards and cause or add to these basic problems or it might be something to do with the way the pistol moves in your hand under recoil. Basically, I don't know but something tends to drive a chunk of your trigger finger tip into that narrow gap.

    You can do three things to help these design failures. The first is to smooth off the trigger safety as described in a post above. Next, you can carefully round off any sharp bits at the tip of the trigger. If you have a grooved trigger it is worth getting a smooth faced G17 trigger before you do any of this. If you mess any of this up or just don't like it you have only modified the trigger/trigger bar and can get another one for about $15. The third thing takes more determination because you are changing the frame and that is not as cheap to replace.

    You need to smooth the surface of the trigger guard where you finger rubs. This reduces its friction and reduces the chance of it grabbing your finger. Not just smooth but very smooth as with 1200 grit auto body wet and dry flatting paper. Before you get to the smoothing phase you need to change the profile of the top surface of the trigger guard by angling it down to the edge and rounding the edge. This reduces the force of the finger on the trigger guard and also reduces the tendency to grab the finger. Mine are done the same on both sides so that there is a visible edge along the middle of the trigger guard where the molding line is now. Needless to say, you do all this with the trigger out of the frame. You can do this with a dremel but with one small slip you can make a real mess. It is easy to do it with a smooth file followed by progressively finer grades of emery paper over a flat former. You can probably do the whole thing in 30 or 40 minutes.

    English
     
  14. scattershot

    scattershot

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    With all due respect, I think a trigger fix is a better idea. I have a CZ75 that is extremely painful to shoot after a couple boxes of ammo. My other CZ and two Witnesses don't do that, and I'd rather not carry any extra stuff to the range.

    This is a real problem with the occasional pistol, and if anyone has a permanent fix I'd sure like to hear it.
     
  15. rv4driver

    rv4driver

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    I traded away an XD40 for the same reason. The Glocks don't do it as much and I don't notice it until I've been shooting one all day.

    Jeff
     
  16. TangoFoxtrot

    TangoFoxtrot OIF 04-05

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    Actually I had this happen after fireing a few hundred rounds out of my G23.
     
  17. CynicX

    CynicX

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    Get a nice set of shooting gloves. I don't really have a problem with my trigger finger but I have had a KB with a different gun and thankfully I had gloves on.
     
  18. GTwentyThree

    GTwentyThree

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    Another thing that can help is to do what I did. Take some 600 grit wet sanding paper, pull the trigger group out and wet sand the seam and inside of the trigger guard smooth. My G23 had a pretty sharp seam/flashing and it was cutting into my finger as well. After wet sanding the trigger guard smooth it no longer irritates my trigger finger.
     
  19. Rocken

    Rocken

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    Use an emery board and smooth out everything. I can handle a lot with my hands, but I'm a wimp when it came to a Glock 19. I got so upset I set after it one day with my wife's emery board. Wish I would have done it months ago. The best thing that ever happened to that pistol. I was ready to give up Glocks altogether, this made all the difference. I now own a few more Glocks.
     
  20. Brucev

    Brucev

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    No reason to be embarrassed. People get hammer bite with High Powers and the 1911 is well known for being hard on hands... thus the 1911-A1... and beavertail safetys, etc. It is no a flaw in the design. If it were a flaw, everyone would have the same problem with the weapon... be it HP, 1911 or Glock. But people are not all the same. And one single design cannot be expected to perfectly suit the hands and fingers of all people. When I was shooting a lot of double-action revolvers, I found the grooved triggers on S&W revolvers and the wide target triggers to be uncomfortable and awkward... much preferred the more narrow smooth faced triggers. There were even gunsmiths who would smooth out a trigger so that you could do a lot of double-action shooting without hurting your trigger finger. On guns that I didn't want to modify, I just used a bit of tape on my trigger finger. In actual competition, I dispensed with the tape. It worked for me.

    In your case, have someone who knows what they are doing to smooth the safety and trigger face so that when you engage the trigger, the safety is fully depressed rather than projecting slightly in front of the trigger face. You can also have them tend to any easing of the frame that might be helpful. It is no different that easing the frame under a trigger guard on a 1911. HTH. Sincerely. bruce.