close

Privacy guaranteed - Your email is not shared with anyone.

Ejector replacement G19 Gen 3

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by AquaHull, Feb 7, 2012.

  1. AquaHull

    AquaHull

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2011
    Messages:
    198
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    West MI
    Well my new style ejector came in the mail. It's just the metal and no housing. I can't find any videos on its removal. Any ideas on where to find one?

    I know I can take everything apart, I was just looking for a cheat way.
     
  2. voyager4520

    voyager4520 -----

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2009
    Messages:
    8,589
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    SE Colorado
    Take the trigger housing out of the frame. Hold the trigger housing in one hand while you pull the ejector out with a pair of pliers in the other hand. Insert the new ejector into the housing as far as it will go. At the rear of the trigger housing you can see a little slot where the rear of the ejector can be seen, you may need to push on the rear of the ejector with a small flat head screwdriver to get it started. When I did it, I wrapped the teeth of the pliers in masking tape so they wouldn't scratch the ejector.
    [​IMG]
     

  3. bentbiker

    bentbiker

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2009
    Messages:
    4,556
    Likes Received:
    7
    Location:
    Orange County, CA
    Some people change the connector by removing the slide and the trigger housing pin. You might be able to get the housing out that way, but I found it put too much strain on parts for my liking.
     
  4. Roundabout136

    Roundabout136

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2011
    Messages:
    101
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Va
    It's really not that hard. I watched the glock armorer do it for me, and I couldn't believe how quick the process was.

    I have the new ejector in my gen 3 g19 (can't remember the numbers, 30724?) and it fixed my issues. Casings now eject at 4 oclock strongly.
     
  5. AquaHull

    AquaHull

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2011
    Messages:
    198
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    West MI
    I heard of some just yanking it out with pliers, I'll just take it apart and put the housing in my hand like the drawing shows. It probably has never been cleaned anyway. I bought the gun used and have only fired 100 rounds
     
  6. sciolist

    sciolist

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2009
    Messages:
    5,069
    Likes Received:
    2,407
    Location:
    PNW
    If you push it out from behind, no need to worry about damage from pliers.
     
  7. Ware

    Ware

    Joined:
    May 21, 2009
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    0
    Did Glock send you the ejector? And you're not an armorer?
     
  8. DRAGON1970

    DRAGON1970

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2009
    Messages:
    708
    Likes Received:
    0
    Improvise, adapt and overcome. Wrap a piece of tape around the teeth on the pliers.
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2012
  9. chief63

    chief63

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2011
    Messages:
    289
    Likes Received:
    0
    How did you get an ejector in the mail?
     
  10. fastbolt

    fastbolt

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2002
    Messages:
    12,968
    Likes Received:
    4,219
    Location:
    CA Central Coast
    I started mine moving with a small slot tipped screwdriver (from the rear) and removed it the rest of the way with pliers (so the ejector wasn't damaged, as it can still be used in another housing or gun, if needed). Pushed the new one in place by using an armorer nylon /I] bench block.

    In my case, the new ejector and a 3rd extractor didn't completely resolve the erratic ejection pattern (compared to my other Glock of the same model, but much older production). Changed it a bit, though. I was strictly using +P duty loads, too. None of the older standard pressure loads.

    When I have the time, I might even return to using the original ejector, just to double check ejection patterns with the new extractor and the original (standard) ejector, as the ejection pattern was actually a bit more predictable last time out with the original ejector.

    Nothing I can't live with, though ... and not too dissimilar, when it comes down to it, to what I've experienced with the occasional other plastic pistol made by different manufacturers. As a matter of fact, being a long time Colt Model O Pistol shooter (1911 ;) ), it's not like I'm unfamiliar with some occasionally "variable" ejection patterns, depending on the ammo. :rofl:

    The newest extractor didn't exhibit anything like the wear observed on the first couple of extractors (including the original), though. No wear at all after firing. Seemed like a bit of a better "fit" in the slide's extractor recess.

    BTW, I wouldn't bother replacing the standard ejector with the newer one unless you were actually experiencing significant ejection issues.

    One of the things that I've been a little curious about, however, is whether using the Glock extractor flag gauge made for armorers outside the US might reveal anything in an occasional Glock that exhibits an ejection pattern more variable than 'usual'. Just idly curious whether the dimension between the inside of the hook and the breech face ... and case rim thickness consistency of various ammo ... might be a potential issue at times. I remember when another gun company discovered an unexpected 'generous tolerance variance' regarding the case rim thickness in a particular brand of low-cost "contract" duty ammo when trying to diagnose some feeding issues reported by a few LE agencies using the guns.
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2012
  11. tonyparson

    tonyparson

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2008
    Messages:
    5,079
    Likes Received:
    9
    Location:
    Dayton, TN.
    I was wondering the same thing? :dunno:
     
  12. AquaHull

    AquaHull

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2011
    Messages:
    198
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    West MI
    I had a armorer order it from Glock, and he then mailed it to me.
    Didn't cost me a penny, just had to leave positive feedback on the forum he was found on.
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2012
  13. Ware

    Ware

    Joined:
    May 21, 2009
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    0
    As immoral as that is, I can't believe there aren't more armorers doing that for folks. Maybe an armorer can chime in here - does that break your oath? :pirates:
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2012
  14. fastbolt

    fastbolt

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2002
    Messages:
    12,968
    Likes Received:
    4,219
    Location:
    CA Central Coast
    Once you've been an armorer for any length of time, you start to gain experience in seeing how easily a lot of folks damage parts and/or guns by trying to do some "simple" repair or correction on their own. :whistling:

    As an armorer for a number of different makes/models of handguns, I've often had other armorers (for more than just Glocks) bring me guns for which they either couldn't properly diagnose a problem, or had made some simple mistake trying to repair the gun.

    People screw up things in armorer classes all the time, even "firearms enthusiasts & owners" ... and even in Glock armorer classes ... and yes, even getting an armorer certificate is no guarantee against making mistakes once you return home and start "working" on guns. :shocked:

    I've often thought that becoming an armorer was an ongoing apprenticeship sort of thing, and being able to practice your skills under the watchful eye of a more experienced armorer was sometimes helpful. It sure helped me ... and I've been told by a number of our other armorers that it's helped them become better experienced and knowledgeable.

    Once you've stood at a cleaning station and watched someone install a magazine spring backwards and/or upside down, a follower backwards or a recoil spring assembly the wrong way ... you start to become a bit hesitant to let them have more leeway to screw something up in the firearm ... especially one being used as a dedicated defensive weapon which might actually be called upon to protect a life.

    Besides, as an armorer we'd probably all like to make sure the owners/users of the guns enjoy the intended good functioning and desired optimal service from their firearm, so it's usually better to do what we've been trained to do, instead of letting someone risk compromising the inherent safety and proper functioning of a firearm just so they can feel good about themselves and being able to "work on" their own guns.

    And yes, Glock expects a certain professional level of behavior from its armorers who maintain their current status (as do other companies, of course).
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2012
  15. Ware

    Ware

    Joined:
    May 21, 2009
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for your insight.
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2012
  16. AquaHull

    AquaHull

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2011
    Messages:
    198
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    West MI
    I forgot his name already. I lost the spring that held the housing to the trigger bar and spent 10 minutes looking for it. Then forot how it went. So I took my other G19 apart and had 2 in pieces:rofl:
    I was told upon purchase the gun was polished and had glock parts. Well the connector had Ghostinc.com on it.No polished parts. The guy got ripped off at Silver Bullet in Grand Rapids/Wyoming MI. So I put my Ultimate connector in

    I'll report back after a range trip
     
  17. R.T.

    R.T.

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2011
    Messages:
    125
    Likes Received:
    0
    Glock would not be happy about this situation!
     
  18. AquaHull

    AquaHull

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2011
    Messages:
    198
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    West MI
    Well, after 20 rounds , it ejects even closer to my head, obstructing my vision. The old 336 was much better:crying:
     
  19. AquaHull

    AquaHull

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2011
    Messages:
    198
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    West MI
    Well since their creation sucks, I guess not.:yawn:
     
  20. fastbolt

    fastbolt

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2002
    Messages:
    12,968
    Likes Received:
    4,219
    Location:
    CA Central Coast
    Hey, de nada.

    Just a personal opinion based upon my experience and observation over some years.

    What I meant to make more clear (but was distracted while trying to write my post) was that if even folks who have been to an armorer class or two can make mistakes with guns, it's not hard to understand how folks without any armorer training & experience can make mistakes, too.

    I've had someone think they knew how to remove an extractor pin in a 3rd gen S&W pistol ... and that it was somehow necessary to remove the extractor for 'regular cleaning' ... absolutely ruin the slide in an unsuccessful attempt to remove the pin. Expensive part, BTW.

    Another gentleman (who seemingly fancied himself some sort of a skilled firearms shooter and "expert") brought in a gallon freezer bag containing almost all the parts of his issued weapon. His explanation? He thought his gun required a "more detailed cleaning" than just field stripping, and thought he could figure it out himself.

    Another guy let an armorer at another agency (trained on another brand of pistol) try to "fix" a perceived "problem", and the result was a mangled part and a damaged frame (plastic). Fortunately, the frame was still serviceable and the part was easily replaced (by someone who was familiar with working on that gun). The "problem" they thought they trying to fix? No clue. Perhaps it was a shooter-related issue. The attempt did manage to create a real problem, though ...

    I could on & on & on with this sort of thing. When armorers get together it can result in an endless supply of such stories and experiences.

    FWIW, the manufacturers with whom I've typically dealt (when having to call for new parts) have generally been decently understanding of things when I've explained I was trying to restore a weapon back to normal functioning after it had been "fixed until it was broken" by some owner or user. Usually I get a chuckle and some brief sympathy (meaning it's not like I'm the only person who calls with this sort of explanation :rofl: ).
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2012