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Educate me on DVD Recorders

Discussion in 'Tech Talk' started by nognig, Sep 16, 2006.

  1. nognig

    nognig

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    Alright, my VCR took a crap and my the display on my 4-year old DVD player is going out. Hardly anyone sells VCRs anymore and the price of DVD recorders is actually quite reasonable now. So, I'm looking to replace both units with a DVD recorder.

    I don't watch a lot of TV, but usually once a week or so I'll catch an interesting program when I'm on my way to bed. So I usually tape 2 hours or so of video, rarely keeping the original video after I watch it, usually just taping over it.

    So, what should I be looking for in a DVD recorder? Obviously, multi-format would be nice, at a minimum DVD-R/W and DVD+R/W.

    How long will a DVD+/-RW last if I keep erasing and recording over the same disc? It's not really a big deal considering how cheap they are now.

    Anyone have any model recommendations? I'm looking to spend around $200-300.

    Thanks,
    NN
     
  2. js_gresham

    js_gresham Where am I? CLM

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    I would recommend you get one that for-sure supports -R/-RW because the "-" formats work a heck of a lot better on standard DVD players than the "+" formats do.

    Look for one with a hard drive. The benefit here is you can edit out the commercials before you burn to disc.

    At maximum quality, you can record 1 hour on a standard DVD-/+R, 2 hours at standard quality; recording quality doesn't start to degrade until you try and put more than 3 hours on a single disc in my experience.

    DVD recorders that support "dual layer" media should be on the market now (haven't checked lately) and those could be a good thing to get also (2 hours at max quality/4 at standard quality, etc).

    I bought one three or four years ago and love it. I record shows to the hard drive, edit out the commercials, and record them to disc. Of course, now the question is when am I ever going to watch these again! :)

    j
     

  3. nognig

    nognig

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    Thanks for the reply. I went out and bought a Sony RDR-GX330 for $190 at circuit city (who actually had the lowest price out there). It doesn't have a hard drive, but I couldn't justify the extra expense, since those models are going for $500+.

    I've messed around with it a little and I think it'll fulfill my needs perfectly. I rarely keep the material I record after I watch it, so I'll probably stick to DVD-RWs.

    You can't actually watch what you've recorded on the DVD unless you finalize the DVD. That is, you can't watch it on your computer or a regular DVD player; you can obviously watch it on the DVD recorder.

    You can actually edit the stuff you record (remove commercials) on both DVD-Rs and DVD-RWs. You don't actually get the space back, however.

    I'll likely record on a DVD-RW. If I want to save the recording, I can edit it, finalize it, then make a copy on my computer.

    NN
     
  4. Washington D.C.

    Washington D.C.

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    They may have improved some but normally if you want to watch video DVD's on a standard DVD player or a computer they usually require DVD R's not many will play video on DVD RW's.If you just use the DVD video recorder to play them you shouldn't have a problem with DVD RW's.Wow $500 is a lot for a DVD video recorder.Maybe those are the new high def type.Without al the other high def stuff those wouldn't do much good anyway.I made a video recorder out of an old PC.Buying one would have been cheaper and much easier.