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Easy Goose Recipe

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by WFR, Jan 9, 2003.

  1. WFR

    WFR

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    One of the guys at work got several geese while hunting down in MD.
    I have a cleaned, skinless 6-8 lb bird sitting in salt water, in the fridge overnight.
    Give me a good way to cook it. PLEASE!
    Thanks!
     
  2. Garweh

    Garweh CLM

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    The easiest way to cook the goose would be to braise it. The goose can be braised in a dutch oven or covered stock pot.

    Method:

    Cut the goose into legs, thighs, breasts, and wings. Season with salt and pepper and set aside. Clean, peel, and coarsely chop a couple of large carrots, a large onion, and a few stalks of celery (exact amounts are not important--these are for flavoring). Sweat the onions and carrots in the pan on top of the stove in a little butter or oil (or cut up a few slices of bacon and use the rendered fat instead of butter or oil) over low to medium heat until they caramelize or brown lightly for added flavor. Add a whole bay leaf,some dried thyme, and the celery to the pan and place the goose pieces on top of the vegetables. Add one to two cups of red wine and a cup of chicken broth to the pan. Bring to a boil on top of the stove and then cover tightly (with the lid or with aluminum foil) and cook in a preheated 325 degree oven for about 30 minutes. Check the goose after 30 minutes or so and add more wine or water so that there is always liquid in the pan. The goose should cook in about an hour. When the goose is tender, remove the goose from the pan and cover the pieces with foil to keep warm. Degrease the pan juices, taste them for seasoning--add salt as necessary. Remove a couple of tablespoons of the pan juices and blend well with an equal amount of flour. Bring the pan juices to a boil on the stove top and whisk in the flour mixture--this will thicken the gravy. Strain the gravy if you want or just remove the bay leaf. Serve the goose with the gravy and with mashed potatoes. You could also add sliced, fresh mushrooms and/or a bag of defrosted pearl onions to the pan during the last 30 minutes of cooking.

    This may sound complicated, but it is really just a variation of coq-au-vin or chicken stewed in red wine. The most important things to remember are to use a moist heat cooking method (goose can be tough) and to degrease the cooking liquid (goose contains a lot of fat, although a skinned one should not be too bad). Basically, you cannot go wrong with this method. Use ingredients that you like and you will have a terrific meal! I would avoid roasting the goose since it is already skinned (If you want to roast it--wrap it in bacon to keep it moist and roast at 325 degrees). Sorry that I cannot give you an exact time as to how long the goose will take to cook, but an hour should be pretty close.
     

  3. 333

    333

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    How do you degrease the juices? Thanks.
     
  4. bustedknee

    bustedknee The Snowflakes have invaded GT

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    My favorite way to prepare a wild goose is to trade it to someone for a fish or a candy bar or a bag of Fritos.
    I just don't like them. Maybe I need a good recipe.
     
  5. WFR

    WFR

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    I cooked it in the oven in a broiling bag.
    I seasoned it with salt, garlic, pepper.
    Added a package of Lipton Golden Onion Soup mix and a can on Chicken broth in the bottom of the bag.
    Cooked it to 180 degrees and let it sit over night.
    This AM I cut up potatoes, carrots, onions, celery and mushrooms and put them in a pot. I added the broth from the bird and another can of chicken broth.
    Pulled the meat off the bone and sliced it into thin 2 inch long strips and added it to the pot.
    Pretty damn good if'n I don't say so myself.
    Tastes alot like roast.
    Oh well, it was free, and as a bachelor I don't pass up free food.
    Thanks for the recipe ideas.
     
  6. tjpet

    tjpet

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    Haven't tried this with a goose but works well on duck.

    1.) Cut bird into pieces.
    2.) Cover with BBQ sauce of your choice.
    3.) Put under broiler for 45 minutes total turning pieces and recoating with sauce every 10 minutes.

    Recipe is from an old Marlin rifle catalog (anybody remember when they had recipes with each new year's catalog?) and I believe was called "Chesapeake Bay BBQ'ed Duck."

    If you like waterfowl cooked to the consistency of shoeleather this isn't the recipe for you. Bird comes out about medium well.
     
  7. Garweh

    Garweh CLM

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    333:

    You can degrease the juices by skimming the fat off the top of the juices with a spoon or with a ladle, you can use a gravy separator (spout at the bottom of the cup--allows you to pour off the "good" stuff and leave the fat behind), or you can chill the juices until the fat solidifies and lift it off (or add a few ice cubes to chill the fat).