Easing the hammer down, problem?

Discussion in '1911 Forums' started by Blaster, Mar 19, 2010.

  1. Blaster

    Blaster Hunc tu caveto

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    I am very new to 1911s. In the process of shopping I was in a shop that is noted for building high end 1911s, $3K and up for their guns.

    I was looking at a factory gun in their case and rather than just dry firing the gun to lower the hammer I put my thumb on the hammer pressed the trigger and lowered the hammer with my thumb. The sales guy just about jumped across the case and said "NO DONT DO THAT", "you could break the sear like that". I believe he said something about catching the sear in the hammers half notch.

    What say you, any truth in what I was admonished for?
     
  2. tous

    tous GET A ROPE!

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    In my opinion, the sales guy is wrong.

    Consider, when the hammer is released from the sear, does the hammer really care how fast it falls? :headscratch:

    Yes, the hammer may engage the half-cock notch, but only if you let the trigger come forward as you lower the hammer. So what? That is by design. It is intended to catch the hammer should the pistol be dropped and land with enough force to dislodge if from the sear. It wouldn't be there if the sear couldn't snick in there. :supergrin:

    Note: Series 80 Colt 1911s have no half-cock notch. The firing pin safety replaces that function.

    I could be wrong. :whistling:
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2010

  3. Eyescream

    Eyescream hates you

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    Tous, I demand you go into the do's and don'ts thread and teach me more stuff. :miff:
     
  4. tous

    tous GET A ROPE!

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    I was just sitting here wondering just what I would have to do to actually break a sear. I have seen very few legitimately broken sears, usually fractured where the hole is.

    I guess if you work hard enough, you can chip the engagement surface, but dang it, these pistols were designed for GI use, in the fog of war and eleventy thousand rounds between depot refurb.

    They ain't made of crystal, dang it.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2010
  5. Frequency

    Frequency Wat

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    ive seen this come up a couple times. i do it all the time, hope im not screwing anything up lol
     
  6. glock2740

    glock2740 Gun lover.

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    Sounds like a counter jockey blowing smoke. I was in a gun store one time, actually looking at buying one of their guns (Kimber CDP Pro)and they wouldn't let me dry fire it unless I bought it first:dunno:I chuckled and told him I wasn't buying any gun without dry firing it first , just to see what kind of trigger it had and walked out and went and bought the same model from the gun store down the street.
     
  7. G36_Me

    G36_Me

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    There is an element of truth in most things you hear at a gun store. It might be partial truth; it might be misapplied truth; it might be total truth. Many times the truth is 'true' under a given situation applied to a specific gun. Sometimes the truth is supplied by the mfg just to manage anticipated future litigation, especially if the mfg has been burned by something in court previously. How to determine the truth as applied to a specific situation is the goal of a lifetime of accumulated knowledge.

    Given that I don't know the gun you were handling and the specifics of the situation, I don't have any absolute truth to give you.

    So, why am I typing this 'bulls--t" above? To lecture you and show how wise I am, no. I want to type some stuff from my Kimber 1911 manual.

    page 11, section: Hammer Safety Stop says:
    The safety stop is not a manual safety! Do not under any circumstances use the safety stop as a "half cock" position. This misuse can result in damage to the sear, and/or unintentional discharge of the pistol. The safety stop position is an automatically engaging safety feature and should never be engaged by hand! (note: the exclamation points are in the manual, I did not add them.)

    now, if you continue to read the manual:
    page 25 starts the section on Unloading and I am quoting from page 26, point 5:
    Pull the trigger allowing the hammer to free fall forward on the empty chamber. Do not "ease" the hammer down by holding or blocking it. Doing so may mar the sear tip which will result in a substandard trigger pull.

    I'm not here to tell you the Kimber manual is right or wrong or debate the merits of the half cock position. I'm sharing what Kimber says in their 1911 manual.

    So, if you were handling a Kimber and the clerk had read the manual; they could easily have reacted as you described.

    Happy shooting and thanks for reading this.
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2010