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DVD-R, +R, +-R, RW, etc

Discussion in 'Tech Talk' started by Nightspell, Jan 30, 2006.

  1. Nightspell

    Nightspell Avid Nudist

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    Would anyone be so kind as to clarify for me the differences between DVD-R, DVD+R, DVD+/-R, etc? Having a hard time figuring this out.

    Sorry if it's been covered, couldn't find it w/search.

    Appreciate any help!
     
  2. vanRichten

    vanRichten

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    They are the same basic thing. The difference comes in the burners. There was such a standards war, read VHS/Beta from the late 70's early 80's.

    Just make sure that whatever drive you get matches whatever media you get. Other than that, they are more or less the same. Same size, looks the same, etc.

    Now, the +/- R's are drives that will work with either the +R or the -R. There is also the RW which can be rewritten too, but they aren't worth it IMO.

    Now, to make things even more fun you have the DL which is the dual or double layer which is about twice the storage capacity.

    Shoot me a message if you have any questions.
     

  3. Sgt. Schultz

    Sgt. Schultz Annoying Member

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    Its been my experience that DVD-R’s are more likely to be compatible with older standalone DVD players.
     
  4. Nightspell

    Nightspell Avid Nudist

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    Ahsoo, thanks for the help guys, that pretty much clears it up. The guy at Best Buy didn't do so well, lol.

    Thanks again!
     
  5. RaiderRodney

    RaiderRodney Just Win Baby

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    I can 2nd that.

    And I use DVD-RW's all the time and they think they are well worth it :) Be sure to get good quality media as well. I am partial to Verbatim myself ;)
     
  6. Furant

    Furant Millennium Member

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    Wait, wait, wait. Unfortunately, there's no simple answer. You can actually achieve much higher compatibility from DVD+R than you can from DVD-R by using what's called Bitsetting (or changing the book type). Many of the burners out there these days have firmware (either original or hacked) that allows you to change the book type of your blank media, thereby tricking your DVD player into thinking that your DVD+R is actually a DVD-R, or, even better, a DVD-ROM.

    My Lite-On 832s and 1635s both have this capability and I haven't found a player that my +Rs (booktyped as DVD-ROM) don't work on yet. Also, the burns on +R media are of much higher quality (with my particular setup and media choices). My particular media of choice is Taiyo Yuden YUDEN00T02.

    Read about bitsetting here and some opinions on blank media here.

    Joey
     
  7. David N.

    David N.

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    What? No mention of DVD-RAM? ;N
     
  8. Sgt. Schultz

    Sgt. Schultz Annoying Member

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    Why go to the trouble of Bitsetting when the + and – media sells for the same price?
     
  9. Furant

    Furant Millennium Member

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    Great question, two reasons:
    1. DVD+Rs can be bitset to DVD-ROM which is significantly more compatible in older players than even DVD-R.
    2. DVD+R really is a much better designed and implemented writing standard that is less prone to errors, requires simpler writing strategies than DVD-R and is less susceptible to speed-induced writing errors. In fact, parity bits are created and transmitted (for error detection) for all of the data specifying the address of the location to which the data will be written in the DVD+R standard, but in DVD-R, only SOME of the addressing data is protected with parity bits.
      [/list=1]

      Joey
     
  10. jack19512

    jack19512

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    I am not trying to hijack this thread so please excuse me, but I heard that the lifespan of burned DVDs is anywhere from 2 to 5 years. Anyone know if this is true? Thanks
     
  11. Furant

    Furant Millennium Member

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    Well, I know for the Ritek DVDs I've used, their life span is showing that it's more like 9-12 months. There are an awful lot of variables that can impact DVD longevity, but the dyes used seem to indicate that anything but the best media should be avoided for DVDs meant to last.

    You can test the quality of your burns using CD/DVD Speed by Nero (you can get it free here). It actually gives you a quality rating score. When I burn a DVD, I jot down the quality score in Sharpie marker on the face of the DVD. This way I can re-test the DVD in the future to get some view as to how it degrades over time. You can also save a screen capture of the scan straight from within the application. If you're inclined to do some homework, read this to better understand the output of CD/DVD Speed. If you can't tell, I've spent a bit of time reading up on this, because I've burned too many expensive coasters. But since I've switched to bitsetting and the Taiyo Yuden, I haven't had a crappy scan or a time-degraded disk yet (although I've only been using them for about 9 months).

    Joey
     
  12. Blue59

    Blue59

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    All matters CD-R: http://www.cdrfaq.org/

    All matters particular to DVD: http://www.dvddemystified.com/dvdfaq.html

    ......
    Regarding "lifespan of burned DVD's": http://www.cdrfaq.org/faq07.html#S7-4-1

    Mitsui / MAM-A gold disks have the best longevity, but are also the most expensive, ~$1 per blank CD-R, on spindle packs.

    Taiyo Yuden is also one known as the better brands, and is only about $.25 per CD-R for blank spindle packs.

    -----
    Also remember, burned computer media must be stored properly: keep them somewhere cool, dry and in the dark! Light--any light, and especially sunlight--will quickly ruin any burnable disk over time, if you have data on it yet or not.
    ~