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DSL Modem Hookup Question

Discussion in 'Tech Talk' started by Gunmeister, Sep 22, 2004.

  1. Gunmeister

    Gunmeister

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    I'm not a very knowledgeable computer person, so I need to ask a question.
    I'm using a Verizon DSL modem. The modem came with both Ethernet and USB cables. Which one is the best hookup method?
    On the modem there are four LEDs, "Power", "Ready", "Ethernet" and "USB". I am currently using the Ethernet hook up. While on line the Ethernet LED blinks continuously, is this normal?
     
  2. David_G17

    David_G17 /\/\/\/\/\/\/\/

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    yes.

    i would use the ethernet cable (like you have now) just b/c i wouldn't want to tie up a USB port.
     

  3. saber41

    saber41 Guest

    The blinking LED is just indicating that data packets are being transmitted, perfectly normal.

    I too would go with the ethernet connection instead of USB.
     
  4. grantglock

    grantglock /dev/null

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    Ethernet.

    Blinking is preferable to solid green which could mean your computer has a virus and is scanning / sending email.
     
  5. NetNinja

    NetNinja Always Faithful

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    Get yourself a 4 port linksys router also.

    you can attach 3 additional computers and the router has some firewall capability.

    Also change the default admin password to something else besides admin.
     
  6. LoWRyDa

    LoWRyDa Homercles

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    http://www.linksys.com/products/product.asp?grid=33&scid=35&prid=601

    This is a great one to get, i just got it about a month ago, pretty easy to set up, the CD does everything for you and once your in the admin page its pretty easy to customize the security, its pretty nice to know that although you don't have wireless products yet, you can always buy them in the future since you are already wireless capable
     
  7. lomfs24

    lomfs24

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    Just my own thoughts, for what they are worth.

    Ethernet was designed for networking. USB was designed to be the next generation of serial port. USB was never intended to be used as a networking device, although it can be pressed into that roll. Use the ethernet connection.

    Blinking light= normal. Windows machines are noisy anyway so even if you are not using the internet it will probably blink a few times every 5 to 10 seconds.

    For some reason, no matter what question is asked someone will always say get a router. If you only need one computer, no need to get a router. There is probably a web interface where you can configure your DSL modem and have all the security a router offers anyway.

    If you need more than one computer I have recently found this router at Radio Shack. At first I thought, "Oh Yeah, another router and wireless card combo." But the more I looked at this router the more cool things it can and will do.

    http://www.radioshack.com/product.asp?catalog_name=CTLG&product_id=25-3205
     
  8. Sho Nuff

    Sho Nuff The baddest

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    Activate your firewall in Windows if you don't use a router.
     
  9. fastvfr

    fastvfr Ancient Tech

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    I use the USB on a Smooth Wall Linux machine with as my gateway machine, and then use its PCI NIC to feed the Linksys router my Linux and Windows PC's are attached to...

    See, the fact is I WANT script kiddies to DL the files they find on the SW box! Not that any ever have...but if they are clever enough to grab 'em, they are going to get the '*****slap' of their lives!!

    As far as your case goes, however, I recommend using the USB port, since even USB 1.1 supports 12.0Mb/s throughput and your DSL will be less than 1.7Mb/s if you got FullSpeed. So there is plenty of bandwidth headroom there. Another solution would be to use Ethernet and configure a WL PCI card to interface with a WL AP, then put radio cards in the other rigs.

    Wireless costs more, but it is vastly more flexible. If you don't take some precautions, however, you might wind up getting Wardriven or have a neighbor sucking off some signal for himself! (Read: CHANGE THE AP's default password!!)

    Open a browser and input http://192.168.xxx.xxx (x's = your modem's IP addy) to access its functions and set up its packet filtering states. This is how you access the AP, as well.

    I have a SpeedStream 5200 modem, and it has NAPT filtering. That is good enough for protecting anything you might have, although out of the box the packet filtering is OFF.

    Set it on Low at first, then raise the bar to Medium and finally to High, testing all of your e-mail clients, FTP, browsers, ect. for functionality at each step.

    BTW, the DSL Attendant is an uneccessary chunk of resource-hogging code; I always disable it as soon as any kinks are worked out, then set it to NOT start up with Windows. Better bandwidth and a faster PC can't be a bad thing!! O/C, those are moot points with a Linux box as an entry point...

    Good luck,

    FastVFR
     
  10. lomfs24

    lomfs24

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    If all I wanted to do was leech off your bandwidth and/or cruise around on your network why would I even need to know your AP's password? The only thing that prevents is someone from the street gettig onto your router and screwing around with the settings.

    Don't get me wrong, you should change the password on the AP but a much stronger approach would be to do MAC address filtering. I would suggest that as much or more so than WEP. At least for my area. If someone is smart enough to clone a MAC address they are probably smart enough to break your WEP key anyway. If someone wants on you wireless network they are going to get on. Otherwise you are only keeping out those who wouldn't be on your system anyway.
     
  11. frefoo

    frefoo

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    Mac filtering is a good start, however I dont like to make it easy for people to find/access my wireless network.

    I use...

    1. Mac filtering
    2. Change the default password AND SSID to router
    3. Turn on WEP, Although WEP can be broken it will prevent most of the script kiddies away.
    4. Disable SSID broadcast, so the network is hidden from Windows/ script kiddies etc.

    Currently from my living room there are 4 other wireless networks I can connect to if I wanted. That leaves my network pretty much untouched except for me/friends that know how to connect to it.
     
  12. David_G17

    David_G17 /\/\/\/\/\/\/\/

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    lol @ recommending wireless, routers, etc.

    ignore them, what you really nead is a sun server capable of SMP. or perhaps a beowulf cluster. it makes checking e-mail much faster. well, actually it doesn't, but it sounds cool.
     
  13. lomfs24

    lomfs24

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    David, can I get a beowulf cluster of Sun Servers? I WANT one!!! The problem with that would be that you could download a virus so fast that your Norton AV couldn't be able to catch it. ;f
    ;z

    frefoo. Looks like you have a pretty good defense against Windows Script kiddies.

    Still, the rule of thumb, treat any data that is going over a wireless connection as going through a hostile netowrk.
     
  14. fastvfr

    fastvfr Ancient Tech

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    Lomfs24;

    I disagree.

    You will not get a single byte of bandwidth from a WLAN I have set up, though if you knew the password you could access the AP's router and untangle the security measures I installed.

    You would need to get physical access to my WLANs in order to get MAC addies, IP addies, PC workgroups and PC names, and the WEP keys -THEN you'd need to physically disable the PC that is on the IP you intend to use- before you would get anywhere. The AP simply will not allow you access.

    The reason it is imperative to change the AP's password is, as you say, to disallow any changes to the strict access rules that are configured. For instance, I insist that there are a limited number of PC's that can access the AP from inside. If the company uses 4 workstations, then there are four portals available. No more.

    Not only do I set up MAC authentication, but also workgroup and PC name authentication, IP authentication, WEP, as well as disabling the SSID.

    If you know a wireless network exists, that gives you a target to aim for; unless steps were taken it is just a matter of time until you are in.

    If no steps are taken you can set yourself up to grab anything on any drive on the network in a matter of minutes, true enough.

    However, I have offered WLAN hardening to clients as part of my services for years now. Hence, if the internal WLAN can be hacked, I can do it with aplomb.

    Knowing how to invade a WLAN, just as knowing how to pick locks efficiently, gives you the know-how to build a virtually impregnable WLAN...or a pick-proof lock.

    If I use every sneaky trick I have ever heard of to bust in and still get a "Resolving Host: Timed Out" screen for my efforts, well, that's probably as good as it's going to get. For now.

    Regards,

    FastVFR
     
  15. lomfs24

    lomfs24

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    I agree fastvfr. If you take all those precautions it would definately be a daunting tast to break your network. However, the post that I quoted only indicated the need to change the password.

    All of those other steps are definately a must.


    U was just thinking if the network you described could still be broken, It sounds like a brick wall. It would take some time to break but I could ptobably get as far as the router and would probably be able to surf. It would take some time depending on the level of WEP encryption used. And it would definately take longer than your average script kiddie would be willing to spend to do it. But you have it as good as wireless is able to get right now.
     
  16. fastvfr

    fastvfr Ancient Tech

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    Well, maybe you could grab some surf on the small office networks I have set up, given enough time and effort...but not this one I have at my home.

    Ever take a close look at Smooth Wall Linux 2.0 Final?

    http://www.smoothwall.org/

    As I said, that's in between the ADSL modem and my internal WLAN.

    Even if you managed to crack the AP, you'd never get into a PC or onto the Web, since the XP box has multiple layers of security added and all the Linux machines have SW running alongside the Debian/SuSE kernels.

    From the Web, you'd have your work cut out for you just trying to hack into my honeypot - which is filled with all sorts of nasty stuff no one in their right mind would want on their PC, Linux or M$! Files that turn a *Nix machine into a full-on zombie, a few files that can reflash the BIOS of your MOBO or vid card, or rename all your system files or delete your Root directory from Linux....real fun stuff.

    Isn't this stuff fascinating?

    All this fun, and edumacational, too....

    Best regards,

    FastVFR