Dry firing training?

Discussion in 'Tactics and Training' started by Gthirty9, Apr 4, 2010.

  1. Gthirty9

    Gthirty9

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    Does anyone here dry fire? I'm not in a position to shoot live rounds as often as I'd like to (financially or geographically). I think I want to start doing some dry fire drills a few times a week. What drills do you know of?
     
  2. W4CNG

    W4CNG

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    The Glockstore.com sells a trigger reset kit for $65.00 that you drop into your Glock and you can pull the trigger as much as you want to without having to rack the slide to reset the trigger. PN is T0380-A.
     

  3. CAcop

    CAcop

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    Yes I do. Not as often as I would like but I also got a .22 conversion unit for my duty gun and that is just too much fun to pass up.

    If I could I would dry fire 5-10 minutes every day that I work. I have access to my PD range so I could do it easily. I probably should.

    Mostly when I do dry fire it is just basic sear reset drills at a target. Followed by some draw strokes. Sometimes I will do a few movement drills. Just basic stuff like moving to the left or right, turning, maybe close contact practice.

    You can get a lot of practice in a short period of time with dry fire because you don't have to waste time reloading mags.

    Paul Howe in his first book talked about dry fire being 70% of his practice time.
     
  4. Gallium

    Gallium CLM

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    Among other things, I recommend dry firing to assist with reducing one's arc of motion (for those who are trying to squeeze that last iota of accuracy out of the body :)) I put a post it on the wall @ shoulder height with a dot on it from a sharpie, and I hold the front sight to that dot (without touching), and slowly press the trigger. Each trigger press takes me a good 5-8 seconds (including follow thru).

    I prefer to do this with a SIG versus a Glock, as the trigger resets. I don't dry fire to learn about my trigger, or help to reduce flinching. When I am shooting in a non-combative way, 99.9999% of my concentration is

    - keeping the sights locked on the target, with no distrubance in the sight picture until the shot breaks, so I have no (ok, little) worries about recoil or where the trigger will break. I'm doing all I can to focus on keeping my sights "centered".


    'Drew
    :cool:
     
  5. PhoneCop

    PhoneCop TeleDetective

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    Yes, a lot.

    Most really good shoots dry-fire quite a bit more than they actually shoot. These would be people who are sponsored and for whom the financial and geographical issues are moot.

    This is a very good start and I applaud your initiative and encourage you to follow through with it.

    You are limited only by your imagination. Simply- you should dry-practice everthing you would do whether your thing is IDPA, USPSA, or pure self-defense.

    Draw
    Present
    Target transitions
    Reloads
    Malfunction drills

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7mEoYHdpuLY

    There are other good videos on Youtube on dryfire:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AFhioa1-7FI
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DFhSu-RyqyE


    MemphisMechanic, here on GT, also has this one:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tGRNvSgb-Po
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2010
  6. Jeff82

    Jeff82 NRA Benefactor CLM

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    It's been said that of your "firing," 70-80% of it should be "dry".
     
  7. Ben Stoeger

    Ben Stoeger

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    Man you don't need a list of dry fire drills. Just do the drills you would do at the range, but do them at home without ammo. Thats what I do anyway.

    =)
     
  8. FillYerHands

    FillYerHands you son of a

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    For me the biggest dry-fire help is drawing and getting the first shot off smoothly. At matches I am frequently surprised by how long it takes some to get the first shot off once they draw. I notice a lot of them bring the gun up and go way past the target, then down, then back up, etc., till they settle in. With practice you can shave off a couple of seconds per stage on that alone. It works for GSSF too, just start from low ready instead of drawing.

    For concealed carry, you should also practice drawing from concealment in different situations - standing, seated, with a coat on, etc.

    You can also practice mag changes till your arms hurt, both in match situations and from concealed carry.
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2010
  9. HK Dan

    HK Dan

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    Check out Steve Anderson's book(s) "Refinement & Repetition". It's an effective treatise on dryfire for competition that can easily be adapted to carry. Ben Stoeger also has a good program on his webiste. Both list drills, have log sheets, and are very complete training regimens.

    Dan
     
  10. fredj338

    fredj338

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    Very true. Dry fire practice is an essential part of your training IMO. We would all like to shoot 50K rounds a year, but for most of us, not practical. SO dry fire drills are your friend. Just make sure you practice in the same place, NO AMMO, even in the room. There are far too many stories of guys shooting tvs, cats, light switches, etc. Have a fixed target in a room away from your ammo. GO there & do 10-15m of practice, everyday would be good, but at least once a week between live ammo training is very helpful.
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2010