Dry-firing: some tips, please.

Discussion in 'General Firearms Forum' started by slym2none, Jun 7, 2020.

  1. slym2none

    slym2none

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    Is there some sort of "drill" I should be using for dry-fire practice? All I've ever really heard is "pick a spot on the wall and fire at it, concentrate on keeping the front sight still", basically.

    Help?
     
  2. ak103k

    ak103k

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    Thats a basic type drill. You can do pretty much anything you want in dry fire. Work on your holster presentations, "quick shots", etc.

    People on TV make for good, fleeting, reactive type targets. Use your imagination.
     
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  3. -JCN-

    -JCN-

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  4. ede

    ede

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    You can buy scale targets made of paper to set up stages you'd encounter in a match to practice with.
     
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  5. Tuner Sandwich

    Tuner Sandwich

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    There's two LED lights on my soundbar. From where I sit in front of the TV, those lights fit perfectly in the spaces on either side of the front site. I like to see how long I can hold them, and if I can hold them through a trigger pull.
     
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  6. Dr_fast

    Dr_fast

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    Like Anything else it can be as complex or simple as you make it.

    Be sure though that you don’t train in bad habits like cock in the slide right after you pull the trigger. That’s not something you wanna do in a self-defense situation.

    For myself, I do a ton of dry fire practice.

    Don’t want this to be all about lasers, but they do help a ton for me even with just reflective pointing. I also have a Dry Fire Mag that helps a lot.

    I have lasers on all of my guns but sometimes I will shut them off and use the laser bullet. You don’t want to become too dependent on lasers and sometimes they will fail or you can’t see them in the light of day sometimes. Even if you have a bright green one, it can get lost in the background if you don’t use your iron sites to get on target initially. I found this out in the grasslands when I’m shooting if I’m looking for the laser and it’s behind the target , could be 50 yards away on the dirt bank behind , I can’t see where it is at all and don’t know where to look to see it and it’s really bad. Bottom line, iron sites are best. Lasers are only for appropriate times.

    Lasers do help a ton though with seeing how steady your fingers are on the trigger for dry fire practice if you have a laser guard for example , or just seeing where the dot lands if you have a laser bullet.

    Another tool I have that has nothing to do with lasers is a Dry Fire Mag. That allows me to have repeated shots without having to rack the slide. Still doesn’t simulate recoil, but it allows me to change targets quickly and pull the trigger again. I also have mine adjusted so it’s got a heavier trigger pole in order to strengthen my trigger finger. They are adjustable with different springs.

    As far as just a simple dry fire practice keeping the site steady without other tools, I do most of mine as just first shot training. Again I’m scared to death that I will develop a reflex to rack the slide after I run the first shot. Actually I have done that once and I didn’t like that at all! Yes, at the range, I drew, fired a shot, and then rack the slide and ejected a perfectly good cartridge reflexively. Don’t ever wanna do that again!
     
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  7. sourdough44

    sourdough44

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    Make sure it's empty each time you dry fire. If you leave the room, check it when you get back.

    For good measure, point it at something expendable when you dry fire.
     
  8. collim1

    collim1

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    Balance a quarter on top of the front sight post. Your goal should be to align the sights on a target and squeeze the trigger without disrupting the sight picture or spilling the quarter off.

    It’s not easy.
     
  9. Tuner Sandwich

    Tuner Sandwich

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  10. slym2none

    slym2none

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    redacted
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2020
  11. sciolist

    sciolist On the Border

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    Dry fire is where you practice all the mechanics and visual skills that don't specifically relate to discharge. It allows you to build those skills independent of the distraction of the live gun.

    Isolating things is a very powerful tool in practical shooting practice.
     
  12. Folsom_Prison

    Folsom_Prison Brew Crew

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    Don’t have a desk pop on accident
     
  13. Babysinister

    Babysinister

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    I haven't read any mention of the MantisX system, so I guess it might not be popular round these here parts. But I received it recently and must admit that thus far it's been great for getting me back into a modicum of shape after a long absence from the range. It seems accurate and the results break down credibly in the post-session analysis.
     
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  14. slym2none

    slym2none

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    OK, I have been trying the quarter on the sight-post thing... and it's impossible. The striker causes enough tension in the gun that the coin pops up every time. It doesn't just fall off, it isn't that I am being jerky, it literally pops up into the air a little and then falls.

    Or I just suck, lol.
     
  15. Toocool45

    Toocool45

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    Make sure the guns unloaded. Make sure the guns unloaded. Use good snap caps zoom.
     
  16. B C

    B C

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    Focus on a small object, preferably round and keep the sight on it while to pull the trigger. Any flinching will be noticed. You'll get a feel for the trigger and be able to keep it steady while pulling the trigger.
     
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  17. slym2none

    slym2none

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    See, this is one reason I keep the gun without one in the chamber when I am inside my house... but yeah, I still check it every time. It's weird, before owning a pistol, I would get "mad" (not really) at all the PewTubers that made sure to show you the gun is in a safe condition. I probably even said "That's a little overboard!" at least once. Now I do it, because I will be damned if I want to put a bullet into something I didn't mean to. My floor, my computer, my dog, me... yeah, no thanks. It takes very little effort & time to clear a gun.
     
  18. CZ Glock

    CZ Glock

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    The most important thing in dry firing is safety. Everything else is secondary.

    Above and beyond rules of checking and double checking and triple checking that the gun is unloaded... I have added three more rules for me.

    1. Remove all ammo from the room. It's not enough to remove ammo from the gun. It's gotta be out of the room. (I have a negligent discharge story...but I'll save that for another day.)

    2. Make sure that your backstop wall can stop a bullet....(just in case you pull that trigger with a live round). I prefer that I dry fire towards a solid cinder block exterior wall.

    3. Whenever possible, I only dry fire when no one else is home.

    My above rules are overlapping safety rules. They work for me. I am not saying they have to be for you. Just sharing my method.

    When it comes to specific drills, start by practicing general skills. (Example:drawing from holster, aim at target and fire. You could work specifically on trigger work only. Etc.)

    Then work on specific scenario drills. Imagine having to draw your gun, as if you were being robbed as you are facing an atm machine and your target is coming up behind you.... Etc. Practice the movements.

    Imagine having to get out of bed in the middle of the night and having to draw your gun at an intruder. Practice those movements.

    When dry firing at home, identify possible positions of concealment and cover. (And know the difference between the two.)
    Identify your safe "lanes of fire" ahead of time and incorporate that in your dry fire practice.

    The average person spends at least 8 -10 hours at home. That means the home is a potential area for a defensive encounter. You might as master this area of operation.

    And also, dry fire practice doesn't always have to end with you pulling the trigger. You don't want to condition your self automatically pulling the trigger every time you present the gun.
    Maybe set up some shoot/no shoot scenario. (This will require more creativity to set up.)

    The mind is the weapon. The gun is just the tool. When dry firing, have the combat mindset. This is not the time to daydream.

    Ok... that's my method of dry fire practice.

    But again...the most important thing is safety procedures. After all, the goal of having a gun is to remain safe.

    I hope that helps.
     
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  19. sig357fan

    sig357fan

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    I use dimes, if you can get to a stack of 10 dimes just behind the front sight and pull the trigger with out dumping the dimes, you got a pretty good trigger pull.
     
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  20. BillG174

    BillG174

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    I also have a MantisX. It is very helpful and my dry firing his improved significantly
     
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