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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So I have the polymer 6.5mm sights and want to keep this height on my G23. I really like the U shaped rear bracket b/c the front dot is instantly recognizeable.

Does anyone make a tritium rear sight that is the same as the Glock U shape? I don't want 3 tritium dots, but I'm guessing that if you used tritrium on the U, it would wash out the front dot, so they probably aren't available.

I'm considering a Glock steel rear sight with the U bracket and a Glock trijicon tritium front steel sight.....so at least the front sight will be visible in low light conditions. Is this a dumb idea?

What about Mepro vs. Trijicon? Since I wasted the polymer sights, I'd like to upgrade to a good night sight (but no more polymer bodies).....but at the same time, one of the reasons I got a Glock over another brand was I don't care for the 3 dot systems on my HKs, Sig, or XD compared to the Glock.

Lastly, do I need the Glock tool to put any sight on, or can I make do with other tools?

Thanks,
Sean
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
MMC/PT sights has a number of rear sight variations for the Glock that you might like.
http://www.ptnightsights.com/ :cool:

I tried calling but the number on their site isn't working.

Which one of these options:

1) Bar
2) Double Bar
3) H Bar
4) Box Bar

is the one that looks like the Glock rear sight?

I can't tell from their site as they don't have any pictures of the various rear sights available for the Glock.

Thanks,
Sean
 

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So I have the polymer 6.5mm sights and want to keep this height on my G23. I really like the U shaped rear bracket b/c the front dot is instantly recognizeable.

Does anyone make a tritium rear sight that is the same as the Glock U shape? I don't want 3 tritrium dots, but I'm guessing that if you used tritrium on the U, it would wash out the front dot, so they probably aren't available.

I'm considering a Glock steel rear sight with the U bracket and a Glock trijicon tritrium front steel sight.....so at least the front sight will be visible in low light conditions. Is this a dumb idea?

What about Mepro vs. Trijicon? Since I wasted the polymer sights, I'd like to upgrade to a good night sight (but no more polymer bodies).....but at the same time, one of the reasons I got a Glock over another brand was I don't care for the 3 dot systems on my HKs, Sig, or XD compared to the Glock.

Lastly, do I need the Glock tool to put any sight on, or can I make do with other tools?

Thanks,
Sean
A steel Glock rear, combined with, say, an Ameriglo 0.125" wide front night sight would work well. That combination would certainly work better than point-shooting at anything other than contact distance! :cool:
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well, this is my carry gun, so I took it over to glockmeister at lunch and they are putting regular steel Glock sights on it. They wanted another $50 to put a trijicon on the front.....and I'm poor, so that will have to wait.

Thanks for the help.

Sean

PS. if anyone knows of a tritium rear U shaped sight, please post up.
 

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Conifer Jack
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I'm rather surprised that people spend so much money on things they are never going to see, or use in a real world situation.

If you require a certain type of sight for target competition, be it steel or paper, great, every advantage can either gain you points or shave off time. All well and good when you're playing a game for either quarters or bragging rights.

Those who carry a hand gun as a profession or for personal protection do themselves a great disservice by training with the use of sights. (This statement supposes that the shooter is versed in the use of a handgun and has more than a rudimentary skill level with shooting.)

If we exclude the rare situations where an adversary is engaged at distances of more than 25-30 yards which allows for, and in some cases mandates the use of sights, you will never actually use or even see the sights of a handgun during a confrontation.

I say this not as an absolute certainty nor as a theory but rather based on personal experience in multiple situations as well information collected from interviews with officers involved in on duty and off duty shooting incidents.

All of the factors involved in a 'civilian' type shooting incident, (military combat is a different world entirely... those guys are braver than I ever thought of being) are too varied to fully explore in this venue but there does tend to be some very common denominators in most situations, i.e. distance to target, number of targets, skill level of target, rules or social mores that are overtly or subconsciously obeyed by protagonist and ignored by antagonist, as well as other less obvious but equally important variables.

If your intent is to become proficient with a handgun and it's expected use is that of a combat role then mastering 'reflex' shooting gives you by far the greatest advantage in a real world situation.

Yes, it is impressive to your wife or girlfriend or buddy's that you can cut a five shot cloverleaf at 25 yards offhand but think of how much actual time it requires to accomplish that. Therein lies the problem, we all have egos and want to impress who ever we're shooting with... that means small groups and that means we're probbly relying on the sights.

Next time you go to the range, or out in the trees, riverbank, wherever, put electrical tape over both of your sights and practice glancing over the top of your barrel or slide when you shoot. It's hard at first, then it gets easier, and easier and easier and one day you realize that you have cut down your time considerably when it comes to putting rounds on target, your groups have actually shrunk and you can now shoot proficiently in almost any lighting condition.

I know that this little rant is going to raise a hue and cry from many who frequent this site and as much as I want to be liked as much as any one else there are some things in life, no matter how unpopular they may be are just fact. Please remember, these 'fact' are based solely on my experiences and those of many fellow officers. If there are those out there who have experiences contrary to these I would absolutely love to hear about them, either on here or a PM... after all, I may be old but I still want to learn.

Jack
 

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I'm rather surprised that people spend so much money on things they are never going to see, or use in a real world situation.

If you require a certain type of sight for target competition, be it steel or paper, great, every advantage can either gain you points or shave off time. All well and good when you're playing a game for either quarters or bragging rights.

Those who carry a hand gun as a profession or for personal protection do themselves a great disservice by training with the use of sights. (This statement supposes that the shooter is versed in the use of a handgun and has more than a rudimentary skill level with shooting.)

If we exclude the rare situations where an adversary is engaged at distances of more than 25-30 yards which allows for, and in some cases mandates the use of sights, you will never actually use or even see the sights of a handgun during a confrontation.

I say this not as an absolute certainty nor as a theory but rather based on personal experience in multiple situations as well information collected from interviews with officers involved in on duty and off duty shooting incidents.

All of the factors involved in a 'civilian' type shooting incident, (military combat is a different world entirely... those guys are braver than I ever thought of being) are too varied to fully explore in this venue but there does tend to be some very common denominators in most situations, i.e. distance to target, number of targets, skill level of target, rules or social mores that are overtly or subconsciously obeyed by protagonist and ignored by antagonist, as well as other less obvious but equally important variables.

If your intent is to become proficient with a handgun and it's expected use is that of a combat role then mastering 'reflex' shooting gives you by far the greatest advantage in a real world situation.

Yes, it is impressive to your wife or girlfriend or buddy's that you can cut a five shot cloverleaf at 25 yards offhand but think of how much actual time it requires to accomplish that. Therein lies the problem, we all have egos and want to impress who ever we're shooting with... that means small groups and that means we're probbly relying on the sights.

Next time you go to the range, or out in the trees, riverbank, wherever, put electrical tape over both of your sights and practice glancing over the top of your barrel or slide when you shoot. It's hard at first, then it gets easier, and easier and easier and one day you realize that you have cut down your time considerably when it comes to putting rounds on target, your groups have actually shrunk and you can now shoot proficiently in almost any lighting condition.

I know that this little rant is going to raise a hue and cry from many who frequent this site and as much as I want to be liked as much as any one else there are some things in life, no matter how unpopular they may be are just fact. Please remember, these 'fact' are based solely on my experiences and those of many fellow officers. If there are those out there who have experiences contrary to these I would absolutely love to hear about them, either on here or a PM... after all, I may be old but I still want to learn.

Jack
Well, that's ONE opinion. Or perhaps I should say, one person's OPINION. :whistling:
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
I'm rather surprised that people spend so much money on things they are never going to see, or use in a real world situation.

If you require a certain type of sight for target competition, be it steel or paper, great, every advantage can either gain you points or shave off time. All well and good when you're playing a game for either quarters or bragging rights.

Those who carry a hand gun as a profession or for personal protection do themselves a great disservice by training with the use of sights. (This statement supposes that the shooter is versed in the use of a handgun and has more than a rudimentary skill level with shooting.)

If we exclude the rare situations where an adversary is engaged at distances of more than 25-30 yards which allows for, and in some cases mandates the use of sights, you will never actually use or even see the sights of a handgun during a confrontation.

I say this not as an absolute certainty nor as a theory but rather based on personal experience in multiple situations as well information collected from interviews with officers involved in on duty and off duty shooting incidents.

All of the factors involved in a 'civilian' type shooting incident, (military combat is a different world entirely... those guys are braver than I ever thought of being) are too varied to fully explore in this venue but there does tend to be some very common denominators in most situations, i.e. distance to target, number of targets, skill level of target, rules or social mores that are overtly or subconsciously obeyed by protagonist and ignored by antagonist, as well as other less obvious but equally important variables.

If your intent is to become proficient with a handgun and it's expected use is that of a combat role then mastering 'reflex' shooting gives you by far the greatest advantage in a real world situation.

Yes, it is impressive to your wife or girlfriend or buddy's that you can cut a five shot cloverleaf at 25 yards offhand but think of how much actual time it requires to accomplish that. Therein lies the problem, we all have egos and want to impress who ever we're shooting with... that means small groups and that means we're probbly relying on the sights.

Next time you go to the range, or out in the trees, riverbank, wherever, put electrical tape over both of your sights and practice glancing over the top of your barrel or slide when you shoot. It's hard at first, then it gets easier, and easier and easier and one day you realize that you have cut down your time considerably when it comes to putting rounds on target, your groups have actually shrunk and you can now shoot proficiently in almost any lighting condition.

I know that this little rant is going to raise a hue and cry from many who frequent this site and as much as I want to be liked as much as any one else there are some things in life, no matter how unpopular they may be are just fact. Please remember, these 'fact' are based solely on my experiences and those of many fellow officers. If there are those out there who have experiences contrary to these I would absolutely love to hear about them, either on here or a PM... after all, I may be old but I still want to learn.

Jack
At first, frankly, I didn't agree with you. I've been to a few classes and they've stressed that "point shooting" isn't very reliable once the distance increases.

After reading your full post though, I'd say you are quite possibly onto something.

If I am ever to be unfortunate enough to actually have to use my carry gun to defend myself, I wonder if I won't just start spraying bullets, rather than going with what I've been trained and have been practicing.....taking 1.5 seconds to fire 2 shots CoM.

I appreciate you taking the time to comment.....and I think I may try a little reflex shooting to see how it works out and then at least I'll be making a decision from my experience, not just from what someone has told me.

The only downside I can see is that by mixing training types, I may confuse myself in the event of the "real thing".

Regardless, thanks for taking the time to write and give me something else to think about.

Take care,
Sean
 

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I would stay away from the PT nite sights. I had a them and they seem to last about 2-3 years. They did exchange the 3 sets I sent back but it was a hassle.
 

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Meprolights are my favorite night sights a lot brighter than most other companies that I have used. Check out www.midwayusa.com / goto shop for parts by gun make and model / look up your glock model the check out all the sights they sell. It's a great one stop shop for parts cause you get to choose from a bunch of different companies.
 
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