Drill and Tap a Glock Slide?

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by Matt VDW, Jun 2, 2005.

  1. Matt VDW

    Matt VDW Millennium Member

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    How difficult would it be (for a gunsmith, not yours truly ;g ) to drill and tap screwholes in a Glock slide? I know that the slides are very hard at the surface and much softer underneath, making this type of work problematic. But I've seen other, more drastic, slide modifications done, so I think it should be possible.

    What I have in mind is screwing a Weaver-style base to the slide so I can mount a red dot sight directly to it. Why? Because I want to try using my G37 in NRA bullseye matches and having the dot mounted directly to the slide is the best sighting system I've found, at least with 1911-style pistols.

    And before anyone asks...

    1) Why not use a Docter sight or a JPoint?
    - Because bullseye shooting requires a lot of fine sight adjustments, which (as I understand it) wouldn't work well with those sights.

    2) Why not use a Carver or other frame mount?
    - Because of the Glock's loose slide to frame fit. I know that the frame mounts work fine for the IPSC guys, but if I'm going to make this experiment work, I need to reach a higher standard of accuracy, and that means eliminating as many variables as possible.

    3) Why not use iron sights?
    - Because I've found that I shoot better with a dot sight. Brian Zins could probably win using a Glock with iron sights but I'm no Brian Zins. ;)

    4) Why not use a 1911?
    - Been there, done that. I still love the 1911 but I'm really, really curious as to whether or not a .45 GAP Glock can work as a bullseye gun.

    5) Won't adding weight to the slide make it too heavy?
    - It might. But I've seen 1911 bullseye guns cycle reliably on powder-puff loads even with half a pound of extra weight bolted to the slide. They run slowly -- with a "ker-chunk" instead of a snap -- but that's fast enough for bullseye shooting.

    6) Won't the dot sight break or fall off if it's being jerked around by the slide?
    - That might happen with hot loads. But I'm going to be shooting soft loads with a power factor under 150 and a dot sight can last a long, long time on that kind of diet on a 1911.
     
  2. Custom Glock Racing

    Custom Glock Racing I did it first. Millennium Member

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    It is doable but you will likely have cycleing issues due to the weight of the rail and optic.
     

  3. Speedrock

    Speedrock "To The Point"

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    FWIW, if you get a Match bbl. fitted {or even a "drop-in} it will take up a ton of that Glock slop. Have also seen G21's with their slides top and sides so hogged out they look like Swiss Cheese. Done just to get faster cycling with "poof" loads, etc.
     
  4. Mtrclass

    Mtrclass

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    It is not a problem to do it but as Matt stated you are going to have cycling problems. The inherent flexing in the Glock frame make them much more touchy about slide weight then a 1911.

    Although I have never built a Glock for Bullseye usage, I think with a properly fit barrel and a Dr Dot or JP dot mounted to the slide you could easily get the accuracy necessary.
     
  5. Matt VDW

    Matt VDW Millennium Member

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    Thanks for the replies. I didn't think about the frame flex factor... that could be a problem. I wish I could find a way to add some weight to the slide temporarily to see if the pistol will still cycle. Hmmm...
     
  6. DannyR

    DannyR Moderator Millennium Member

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    I've seen Glocks with C-mores attached directly to the slide, and they seem to function OK.
     
  7. Matt VDW

    Matt VDW Millennium Member

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    Did you see how they were attached? I.e., were they attached directly to the slide, or to a sight base that was attached to the slide?

    And were they mounted fore or aft of the ejection port?
     
  8. Matt VDW

    Matt VDW Millennium Member

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    I found this picture via a Google search:

    [​IMG]

    Goofy looking, isn't it? :)

    I think I'd rather have the sight mounted up front to give the pistol more of a muzzle-heavy feel. The owner of this pistol obviously couldn't do that because of the porting.
     
  9. mcad33

    mcad33

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    have you tried the optima setup. i have one on a long slide 45 glock and the thing shoots great. it also has a fitted barsto barrel. the optimas and dr type optics come with a tool that allows for 1/4 adjustments. once its set lock it and it should be good.
     
  10. Matt VDW

    Matt VDW Millennium Member

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    No, I haven't tried (or even handled) an Optima or a Docter sight. They look very appealing because of their small size and light weight, but I'm still wary of the adjustments. What I really want is to be able to just adjust a few clicks here and there with a minimum of fuss. That's what I'm used to doing with an UltraDot or with Bomar sights. I don't want to be guesstimating each time I move from the 50 yard line to the 25 yard line or back again, or when I have to adjust for conditions.

    BTW, I looked into the C-More and rejected it for the same reason.