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Dog Confrontation - again

Discussion in 'Woof Memorial Critter's Corner' started by Shaman, Jun 24, 2007.

  1. Shaman

    Shaman

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    I live in a quiet well kept neighborhood and like to walk at night at a near by park. I passed a large male (human) on a path and then about 75 yards along here comes a lumbering boxer. Looks to be about 60-75#. :upeyes: We have a leash law but, so what? Here comes the dog, barking etc. etc. I don't know enough about dogs to know for sure if this was going to get ugly but my first instinct was that this pooch was postering. Nevertheless I am in no mood to let him approach. I carry a powerful light (surefire U2) and I've found it usually causes them pause. So I turn on the light, the dog stops but as I turn to leave he keeps comming. Again and again, he won't break off and keeps closing the distance. The owner is taking his time about getting there and tells me to turn off the light. Easy for him to say. The dog won't listen to him either and has closed to about 10 feet. By now I have a .38 special in my right hand discreetly hidden behind by thigh. I tell the owner I don't want to hurt his dog but I won't be bitten. I've made a mental decision to use the weapon if this escalates further. The owner gets between us and eventually corrals the animal and gets him on a leash as I continue to back up and put distance between us. On a different occasion I thought I was going to have to take on the owner. This guy was furious over my use of the flash light as his dog came at me, as though the problem was my fault. Is it reasonable to let a large strange dog approach, sniff my legs and nad's? I'm ranting, I know, but idiot dog owners without common consideration just PMO... :moonie:
     
  2. Greywolf

    Greywolf

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    Tough call, but you did good. I would have told the owner that if he doesn't get his dog leashed and in compliance with the law, then you won't be responsible for taking care of the situation, with force if necessary.

    If he gives you any ****, tell him that he's in violation of the leash law, with a dog that appears aggressive.
     

  3. Blinky

    Blinky Rocket Surgeon

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    yeah, The only thing I would do differently is not to walk away. If the dog is not charging you, but only posturing you will have some warning before the dog will try and bite you. Walking away only encourages the dog to follow. During the encounter I would keep tabs on the dog, but no touching, no talking and no eye with the dog contact is also very improtant.
     
  4. amd4me

    amd4me Coffee Snob

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    Are there park ninjas now as well?
































    Seriously, glad you are okay.
     
  5. Guod

    Guod

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    I don't know why people get so "touchy" about their dogs. I tell people all the time that they are free to discipline my dog(people firmiliar with dogs), and am always careful my dog isn't harassing non dog people.

    Also, if my dog got off leash or got out of my yard, I realize full well that someone may harm him or kill him if he approached them in what seemed a threatening manner. This is why I am so diligent about open doors and making sure his leash and collar are in good condition and always on when out of the house.

    Only problem I have is with people who do not ask to touch or approach your dog, or kinda "sneak up". I had a little kid come out of absolutely nowhere behind me and my two dogs. This is my older shepherd mix and a small yorkie. The older dog is very protective of the yorkie, and he freaked out when this kid practically yells HEY DOGGIE and then moves in to pet the yorkie. He was not going to bite him, but he gave the kid a vicious barking. Parents need to teach their kids about approaching dogs.
     
  6. Grimsi

    Grimsi Restored member

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    Next time SHOOT THE DAMN DOG! owner has a problem, probably a small pecker,dog aproched to 10 feet!? You are letting it get WAYYYYYY too close.


    Again, shoot the dog!
     
  7. Blinky

    Blinky Rocket Surgeon

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    That problem with that is most parents don't know the proper way to approach a dog either.
     
  8. hotlunch

    hotlunch

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    Don't shoot the dog unless it actually clamps onto you and bites. Geez. That's all you need to do: discharge a weapon in a park at night with no witnesses other than the dead dog's owner. It was night and the dog was just doing what dogs do but maulings of strangers in parks is very rare. I know it can be scary if you aren't used to dogs but I have learned that alot of what comes out of a dogs mouth is posturing. Poor thing was just doing what its genes were telling it to do.

    The blame lies soley with the dog's owner. Still, there are so many weird, arrogant dog owners out there these days that it would almost be pointless for you to "educate" him on leash laws, etc. Sounds like you diffused things as best as you could. I'd recommend talking to the police sometime and finding out what your recourse is if this should happen yet again. Forewarned is forearmed.
     
  9. Walter45Auto

    Walter45Auto

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    YOu did good. The guy raised hell bout you shining a flashlight at his dog (pretty ridiculous). He's lucky you didn't have to use the .38. What an ***. My dad used to train dogs when he was around my age, and he always told me "son, I know you love dogs, but always be careful when you go up to a strange one." I never quite understood it enough to practise it (And was really lucky, cause I never got bit or ran into an aggressive one.), so I never did listen. Now I have a nice hard-headed, dominant, and sometimes aggressive GSD, so I understand it.


    :freak:






    :reindeer: :50cal:
     
  10. Shaman

    Shaman

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    I agree the dog isn't to blame. It's dark, he's off a leash away from his owner, and I'm a stranger walking in his general direction. I've seen owners of large breeds in this park at night on various occaisons. I have witnessed owners swinging the leash and walking casually as the dog roams the park freely. I have pretty much decided to limit my walks to the local mall... this IMO is just another form of terror. I don't want to give up my evening walks but don't need the trouble either. I could cruise the park evenings and call the police everytime I see a dog (especially a large one) off the leash. They probably wouldn't bother to come :sad: but it's a thought.