Glock Forum - GlockTalk banner

1 - 20 of 34 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have done some searches, when the frames first hit the market there was a lot of talk. Now it seems that few even remember that they exist.

I want to hear from the fans of the concept. You don't have to sing the praise, I just want to hear others opinions. Please keep the negativity in check, but all talk is useful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
261 Posts
It just seems like crossing a cat and a pig, it just isn't natural!!! But in all seriousness, I like them for their light weight so it would kill the deal for me unless it was just a fun gun.. But since I'm young and have to use guns for multiple roles, it's out of the question
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,715 Posts
There are plenty of all steel guns, buy those. The Glock was created specifically to have a polymer frame... It makes no sense to do a 180 on that design and make an all steel gun...
 

·
Gen4 BETATester
Joined
·
5,297 Posts
I like the fact glocks are Polymer instead of Metal. So I wouldn't really be interested in one that's not. There are plenty of metal frame semi-autos out there. I would prefer glock continue to improve there current offerings then try and start a brand new segment of 1911s or Metal Frame Pistols just my opinion and I am quiet tired as i type this so hope it makes since lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,653 Posts
IMO, it starts to negate one of the Glock's best attributes: light weight. As others have said, there are plenty of all-steel and alloy-framed guns available as alternatives.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
944 Posts
I am patiently waiting for a stainless steel CCF frame. I will find a good deal on one eventually.

I would imagine that a G34/35 with a steel frame would be nice, very little recoil, great for runnin' and gunnin'.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
321 Posts
IMO, it starts to negate one of the Glock's best attributes: light weight. As others have said, there are plenty of all-steel and alloy-framed guns available as alternatives.

I agree!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
325 Posts
The weight (or lack of) does not concern me too much.
I'd certainly like to see/fondly/shoot one.

While I like the light weight of the Glocks, it's the rock solid dependability that attracted me from the start.

From my experience (very little of this), the 1911 steel frames have less recoil than the alloy frames. Of course there is a weight difference but IMO, it's not too big of a deal. I enjoy shooting the steel frames more than the alloys. And I do not mind/notice the extra weight.

There, you have my worthless 2 cents.
As you were. :cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,046 Posts
My only problem with polymer is that it degrades over time. Plastic guns aren't something that will be passed down from generation to generation. Glocks are awesome and just work but you won't be seeing many 70~100yr old Glocks in someone's future gun collection. As more and more polymer is used in firearms, they'll simply become another victim of "planned obsolescence" like every other cheap piece of crap produced these days. Made to last a few years and then its time to buy another one. Increased sales = happy shareholders ya know!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,091 Posts
Next we'll see conversion kits for series I, II and III Land Rovers to replace the aluminum body panels with steel...

In answer, no, it makes no sense unless you are a frame maker in a tough market looking for a niche nobody has yet thought up because it sort of defies any sort of logic yet you think you can convince enough people to buy such a product as to make you and your employees a bit of a living.

Then it makes a lot of sense. ;)

As a stunt, it would be interesting. I'm not certain that FELT recoil would actually be reduced due to the kick-softening properties of the synthetic frame over even a slightly heavier steel frame. Unless the steel frame is not slightly, but drastically heavier, in which case a different sort of shooter fatigue begins to set in on long shooting matches/strings.

For me that takes us full circle back to the "No, it makes no sense" answer.

As for me personally, I always sneak into the bearded lady and six-boobed man tents at the circus, so I'd probably want to hold one, just as long as I didn't have to pay for the opportunity to do so. I'd rather save my money for the carnies next time they come to town.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,375 Posts
Why??

Everyone on the internet complains about all steel pistols being outdated, unreliable, not durable and too heavy.

Hell, even the Berettas and Sig are starting to be called "dated" these days.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,091 Posts
My only problem with polymer is that it degrades over time. Plastic guns aren't something that will be passed down from generation to generation. Glocks are awesome and just work but you won't be seeing many 70~100yr old Glocks in someone's future gun collection. As more and more polymer is used in firearms, they'll simply become another victim of "planned obsolescence" like every other cheap piece of crap produced these days. Made to last a few years and then its time to buy another one. Increased sales = happy shareholders ya know!
???

Unless you shoot them.

How many 1912-built 1911's have had 20 or 30 thousand rounds thru them with minor maintenance and upkeep? I don't understand this post at all, even tho I sort of sympathize with the general theme because I think in many cases it is true, it just doesn't happen to be true with Glocks or other good synthetic pistols.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,046 Posts
???

Unless you shoot them.

How many 1912-built 1911's have had 20 or 30 thousand rounds thru them with minor maintenance and upkeep? I don't understand this post at all, even tho I sort of sympathize with the general theme because I think in many cases it is true, it just doesn't happen to be true with Glocks or other good synthetic pistols.

What I mean is you could buy any all metal gun, shoot it a bunch, throw it in a safe and assuming it is oiled periodically and not exposed to moisture, the gun will be the same 100yrs from now as it is today. Since plastic degrades all by itself over time, the frame will weaken as it gets older. A new Glock put directly in storage might last a bit longer, but When you factor in the stress on the frame from being shot, Sun light (UV rays degrade polymer) drops, etc. the gun just isn't going to be around in usable condition after that length of time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,100 Posts
You could hang some weight off a Glock if that's what you want for the range then take it off to carry. Seems like a better option.
Collectors item? There will be plenty still around in 50-100 years. They aren't very collectible for investment purposes because they make so many.
 

·
NRA Life Member
Joined
·
65,948 Posts
Not a fan, so if all you want to hear is posities, I can't help. best I could say is that a steel frame might help those who don't have the basic fundamentals down to a point where they can avoid limpwrist malfunctions. Otherwise, if it's not "Glock" it doesn't belong on my Glocks.
 

·
NRA Life Member
Joined
·
65,948 Posts
What I mean is you could buy any all metal gun, shoot it a bunch, throw it in a safe and assuming it is oiled periodically and not exposed to moisture, the gun will be the same 100yrs from now as it is today. Since plastic degrades all by itself over time, the frame will weaken as it gets older. A new Glock put directly in storage might last a bit longer, but When you factor in the stress on the frame from being shot, Sun light (UV rays degrade polymer) drops, etc. the gun just isn't going to be around in usable condition after that length of time.
Well, the Glocks that came here in the 80's are still shooting fine. I don't plane to live another 100 years, but I'm pretty sure if I do my Glock will too. I also think your theory about the plastic is nonsense.
 

·
1-man flash mob
Joined
·
4,917 Posts
My only problem with polymer is that it degrades over time. Plastic guns aren't something that will be passed down from generation to generation. Glocks are awesome and just work but you won't be seeing many 70~100yr old Glocks in someone's future gun collection. As more and more polymer is used in firearms, they'll simply become another victim of "planned obsolescence" like every other cheap piece of crap produced these days. Made to last a few years and then its time to buy another one. Increased sales = happy shareholders ya know!
Show me a Gen 1 Glock with degraded polymer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,046 Posts
You could hang some weight off a Glock if that's what you want for the range then take it off to carry. Seems like a better option.
Collectors item? There will be plenty still around in 50-100 years. They aren't very collectible for investment purposes because they make so many.
I was speaking in context of passing your gun down to family member and the sentimental value of the gun not the market value.

Show me a Gen 1 Glock with degraded polymer.
Is the first Glock 100yrs old yet?!

Well, the Glocks that came here in the 80's are still shooting fine. I don't plane to live another 100 years, but I'm pretty sure if I do my Glock will too. I also think your theory about the plastic is nonsense.
http://books.google.com/books?id=mv...&resnum=3&ved=0CCIQ6AEwAg#v=onepage&q&f=false
 
1 - 20 of 34 Posts
Top