Does anyone else suck at interviewing?

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by notokeef, Jan 23, 2020.

  1. M&P15T

    M&P15T All Hail King Kona

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    OP, I'd think the basic issue is confidence. You need to be of the mind-set that your employer, and any other perspective employers, need you more than you need them. You bring the knowledge, skills and experience to get the job done. They had better damn well show you they understand the business, and are willing and able to support you in getting the job done. Ask more questions than they do, don't be passive, be assertive. Ask questions that show that your abilities to get the job done are a foregone positive conclusion, and the only question of importance at hand is whether or not they deserve to have you as an employee. Whether or not they are worth your time, effort and energies.

    OP, it sounds as if you have all the needed skills, experience and knowledge. Make your current employer tell you why you shouldn't take those skills, experience and knowledge elsewhere. Make them either promote you and pay you more, or take your show on the road.

    With the current economy and job-market, now is the time.
     
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  2. PlayerOne

    PlayerOne

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    If they think you're unlikely to walk away from the company, why would they feel the need to promote you? In their eyes, you'll stay and do the job, regardless. Once is understandable, but repeatedly? Might be time to start looking.
     

  3. M&P15T

    M&P15T All Hail King Kona

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    Very good point;

    OP, an employee/employer relationship is a mutual one. And in fact, most of the time, the employer needs the employee a lot more than the employee needs the employer. Hiring a new employee and getting them up to speed costs an employer a huge amount of $$.

    But you sound like your mind-set is that you need this job without question.

    OP, you've got to get a bit of a confident chip on your shoulder, and value yourself. If you're damn good at what you do, other companies will want you.

    The day and age of devotion to one particular company is long, long gone.
     
  4. notokeef

    notokeef

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    Thank you for all the replies. I literally just sat down with my manager (1 of the 3) that interviewed me. I asked him for a complete break down of the points given for all aspects of the job application. Honestly, I am shocked to say the least. First, let me say I work a government job for the VA. I sit at a desk and there is literally no communication skills required what-so-ever. It is all written and so is the job I am applying for (the next level up from my current job).

    So, I'll break down what I was just told.

    -Veterans 10 point preference and disabled veterans preference does absolutely nothing for you once you are in a government job. It is not applied to another government job once you're in.
    -Resume is worth either 1, 3, or 5 points.
    -Job performance is worth either 1, 3, or 5 points.
    -The written examination after the interview is worth 1-10 points.
    -This blew my mind...the interview is worth up to 90 points. (3 mangers ask 2 very long questions each).

    I asked him to provide me with the points I scored. He does not have them but he assured me he would get them to me next week. My mind has been blown that so much merit has been put on an interview and so little on job performance and the written examination.

    So, it looks like before the next round of hiring comes up in October I have A LOT of practicing, videos to watch, and possibly hiring someone for practice interviews.

    Again, thanks for the replies. Oh, and I explained to my manager how I struggle with interviewing and he agreed to give me practice interview questions during my monthly feedback with critiques.
     
  5. Darkangel1846

    Darkangel1846

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    Do you tell them you have a disability? Remember the disability act.
     
  6. DaleGribble

    DaleGribble Sandwich!

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    I've spent a lot of time contemplating this issue due to poor interview performance in the past. Here's what I've come up with and what has worked extremely well for me.

    We have two selves, the real self that we rarely show people and the false, disingenuous self that we show everyone else at the beginning of an interaction or relationship (that's not my theory or original thought). When we go into interviews interviewers are trying to get to the real self of the candidate in front of them. I decided a while back to let my real self be shown, even if it's to my own detriment. I don't bull****, I don't answer questions with what they want to hear and I am totally honest and upfront. I can't even begin to tell you how many times this has been commented on by interviewers and they've all loved it.

    When I'm asked about my weaknesses or failures I honestly put them out there with no apologies. When I'm asked about my strengths, I put them out there with the caveat that I'm not arrogant, I just know what I'm good at. When I'm told about conditions of employment and asked about my thoughts on them, I answer them honestly, even if I know they won't like it.

    One very crucial aspect of all of this is in how you do it. You can't be an ******* about it. You have to do it in such a fashion that shows you're being genuine while still caring about decorum and civility.

    To date, I've gotten numerous jobs this way and only lost out on one, and that was to a friend of mine who had a better resume and more experience than me in that field. I was fine with it because he earned it.

    In your own words, you're a top performer. You need to put that out there in your interviews and be honest about what you'll bring to the table and do it like a confident man that knows what he's talking about.
     
  7. fx77

    fx77 CLM

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    I totally sucka t interviews
    I recall 9 college application interviews. From those 9 I was rejected. I told the truth, and was not coached on gamemanship!
    The 10th college did not interview me and I was accepted,
    Every promotion and hire was based on performance, grades, scores and recommendations.
    After Grad School interviews were pro forma and without depth Surely to see if the pic on the appl. was the person in question.
     
  8. Vito

    Vito

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    Working for the government changes everything. Your bosses will never be at risk of losing their job for poor performance, so whether or not you are an asset to the organization is almost irrelevant. But government managers are very sensitive to not violating political correctness. You might have an advantage in playing up your disability and politely voicing concern that you may be suffering discrimination because of the disability. I hate to say it, but if you were a black, gay, disabled woman you might be a shoo-in for a promotion.
     
  9. oldmick

    oldmick

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    The last 10 years of my work life (after I retired from my career) I was employed part time by the gov't - with a GS rating, of course.

    I too had the distinct impression that promotions were predetermined by "who you know" in government jobs.

    But regarding the interview process, I've always made videos of my presentations and interviews. For interviews, I have my wife create questions (she knows the drill) and then I answer them. Then I review the video and watch my expressions, look for verbal issues like "Ummm" and "uhhhh" and "basically" Then I do it again with these mistakes in mind. It wasn't unusual for me to do this 10 or 12 times until I was much more at ease, no hesitations, no filler words etc.

    Preparation really does help.
     
  10. as400guy1

    as400guy1

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    Got some training on DOING an interview.
    I messed with people's heads.
     
  11. W@rbirds

    [email protected]

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    I lead a relatively large organization, I rarely do interviews now but did so for many years and screened probably thousands of candidates.

    There is some great advice above so I will only add one thing.

    Results.

    You talk about your veteran status, your tenure, your perceived performance all as positive things for this role.

    When you go into an interview it is no longer a team sport.

    Don’t say we did abc..
    Say:
    I was on the team responsible for abc change. My role was, my impact was, the results were....

    What did you do?
    What were the results?
    What was the impact to the business?

    Answering questions showing you exist reliably 40 hours a week isn’t going to win many desirable jobs.
     
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  12. Gino

    Gino Millennium Member

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    The Fed government? I can relate, I'm on the state retirement system, so you prob want to stay in the fed retirement system. Don't hesitate to think about changing agencies. I've found that some agencies are better to work for than others.

    Do you have a degree? The Fed Probation Officer jobs seem pretty good. Also, federal corrections seems to have a lot going for it. Don't isolate yourself in the VA. Go out and look at different fed jobs, you might find something that fits you better...
     
  13. Vito

    Vito

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    I repeat that working for the government changes all the rules. Managers are rewarded for playing it safe and doing whatever will not ruffle feathers. When I was an officer in the U.S. Army during one assignment I had about 30 civilians working for me. When a position was open, whether entry level of supervisory, where I had the decision making authority, I often was obligated, by government policy, to justify my selection if the person selected was not a minority member. There was such a push for advancing minority employees, that I could be overruled on my selection by the Civilian Personnel Office, if I failed to adequately explain why I did not pick the minority applicant. Saying another applicant was better qualified was not acceptable. I had to find a way to justify saying that the minority applicant or applicants were NOT qualified for the job and that the CPO was in error referring them to me for interview. Had I been a civilian myself, bucking this system would have ended my career if not cost me my job. Being military, I could get away with fighting this ridiculous system. Anyone with ambition, and not looking for a safe spot to hide until eligible for retirement, should not even think about working a government job. In the many years since I left active military service, nothing in my dealings with government employees (something I could not avoid when I worked in a heavily regulated industry after my military career) ever caused me to change my opinion of the ineptness, inefficiency, and lack of accountability of government employees.
     
  14. Resqu2

    Resqu2

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    Very true, after the factory I worked at for 25 years closed I went to a place and applied for a regular position as a worker. I had 10 years or more of being a Supervisor. The three guys kept bringing this fact up that how could I work under them when I was used to being over almost everyone. I told them many times that I wanted a job to come to and do my job and go home. I was over the Supervisor type work and all the long hours and stress that goes with it. They never believed me and would not hire me even though a whole bunch of friends and family that work there told them to.
     
  15. Vito

    Vito

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    You should have anticipated that response, which is not unreasonable. Usually when someone is applying for a lower position than the one that they held it is really that the person is desperate for a job, and willing to say whatever it would take to get work. You would have been better off "fudging" your resume or application to delete the supervisory role.
     
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