Does anyone else suck at interviewing?

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by notokeef, Jan 23, 2020.

  1. R.B. Riddick

    R.B. Riddick

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    Stories.

    If you are able to provide examples of problem solving, customer service (internal and external), teamwork/team building, and meeting targets/deadlines in YOUR stories it should help.

    Work stories allow you to answer their questions FIRST, and it allows you to relax during the interview because you are sharing your stories and experiences.
     
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  2. Intolerant

    Intolerant

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    ATTA BOYYYYY.... thats how ya get it done!!! Then find a new job tomorrow...LOL.
    In all honesty, if you have to beg for a raise, you`re working for the wrong company.
     

  3. kwo

    kwo

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    Dealing with the Peter principle sucks.
     
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  4. GeorgiaGlocker

    GeorgiaGlocker Romans 10:9

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    I had one interview where the interviewer sucked.
     
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  5. Ranger357

    Ranger357 Just pixels

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    I can’t speak for all organizations, but I interview dozens of people a year. Virtually every candidate I hire tells me how they thought they did poorly at the interview, when they actually did very well.

    The people who thought they did ok and are most upset about being not hired when I call, typically sucked. When I say “sucked” I mean things like using the “N” word, made sexist/insulting remarks, or disclosed confidential/damaging/negative information from prior/current jobs.

    Interviews alone are proven to be a poor way to evaluate future job performance. What they are very useful for is eliminating people from consideration.

    I got one promotion by noting the position I was applying for “seemed from the outside” to have been very well managed, and that basically I was not looking to change much unless I was given additional information. I got another promotion noting I expected a lot of “challenges” and that I was not afraid of being a force of “dynamic change” when I knew the prior manager had let an entire team become a laughing stock. So yeah it helps to know what your going for if possible.

    I guess short version of what I’m saying is, if your being decent at the interview, maybe it’s actually your skill sets and focuses are what’s holding you back, not your actual interview. With multiple rejections be open to the idea that you may be totally misreading the room on what they are looking for. That’s FAR harder for most people to accept than it sounds. Just some thoughts.
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2020
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  6. canis latrans

    canis latrans

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    this is me, in a nutshell.
    that's okay, though...I can look myself in the mirror.

    (if I have to "be" someone I'm not in order to get a promotion...it's not for me)
     
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  7. Mr Meeseeks

    Mr Meeseeks

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    I can sympathize with having piss-poor interview skills and public speaking skills.

    .
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2020
  8. hogfish

    hogfish Señor Member

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    OP, could it have anything to do with your speech disability?
     
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  9. 'Ol Grandad

    'Ol Grandad Director of civil unrest

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    It's not your interview performance that's keeping you from advancing, it's your managers. They like you where you are. You think they want to compete with you? No, so they keep you where you are, making them look good. Time for a new job.
     
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  10. Border Bandit 32

    Border Bandit 32

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    My experience Is they already know who they want for the job....the interview is just so they can say they were fair and gave everyone and equal shot.....BS!

    Especially if you don't check any of the boxes
    White, middle age, heterosexual male you are F&@$&
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2020
  11. Sfaql

    Sfaql

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    Retired now, I had two jobs my entire work career , never had an interview , but people, told me all the stupid stuff they ask , better that I never had one .
     
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  12. Rotn1

    Rotn1

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    Don’t be down. You seem to know your great skill levels and value to the organization. The organization also seems to be rewarding your performance.

    Folks dont get positions for many many reasons. Some good and some bad.
    Amongst other things no senior positions could be filled without a final interview by me.

    You understand that your interview was lacking...... do you know specifically what part / area?
    Remember HR is generally recruiting to a specification, not always the best person. Often times they are looking for a particular profile.
    If you can, it helps to know the specification and ideal profile beforehand.
    Did you prep?
    Did you practice?
    Interviewing is a particular skill.
    Some people interview very well but fundamentally suck.

    ETA
    A couple further thought:

    Why is your confidence low? Low confidence is never a good projection?

    What was it you were afraid of? You already had a job. The worst case scenario was things would remain the same.

    Folks asking why Companies interview existing employees and say they should already know......
    Well, it’s usually required by company policy or to not depress an existing employee thinking he wasn’t even considered......
    Or because they need to interview insiders before they can bring in an outsider so the employee base feels they can get ahead.
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2020
  13. OGW

    OGW SAF

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    I solved my sucks-at-interviewing problem by having my own business. Did ok.
     
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  14. sciolist

    sciolist On the Border

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    Boom.
     
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  15. Aurora

    Aurora

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    I agree. It was one of the best life decision I ever made.

    The trick to public speaking is to talk about something you like or are knowledgeable about. I could talk for hours about certain subjects but I'm at a loss for some of the BS they ask these days.

    v.
     
  16. hammerkill

    hammerkill Allegheny General

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    Things I learned the hard way about interviewing

    1: don't show up drunk
    2: don't show up stoned
    3: put on clean clothes
    4: don't pass gas or belch
    5: don't use profanity
    6: don't lose your temper
    7: don't open carry
    8: don't spit on the floor
    9: don't wear flip fops
    10: absolutely no blasphemy
    11: don't use racial epithets
    12: don't try to fight the interviewer
    If you follow the above rules you have half the battle one (also learn how to spell)
     
  17. Gino

    Gino Millennium Member

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    To the OP:

    You sound like you have a terrible disease. This disease is "I love the company I work for." You might have to change companies to advance. Get your sorry ass out there and look at other options! Start looking and interviewing. Why should they pay you more if you are a guaranteed employee who already works hard? If they don't want to give you more money, go try someplace else. Also, if they get wind that you are looking elsewhere, they might consider you for the next promotion/raise in order to keep you. The company has no loyalty to you, why do you have loyalty to it?

    Place the blade between your teeth, grab the rope, and swing over to the next ship! Hell, they may have better looking woman over there! Yo Ho, Yo Ho, a pirate's life for me...
     
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  18. SilentRecon

    SilentRecon

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    I wouldn't even Hire a person to flip signs on the street if they did ANY of the above. It's sad that those are even a list of bare minimum requirements. Lol

    How about smoking a cigarette right before coming in to settle nerves but smelling up the office? Shows anxiety and lack of respect as well.

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
     
  19. Vito

    Vito

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    Although I am retired now, I was the VP of Operations for a large health care corporation. I interviewed and hired many, many people, was interviewed myself many times for better jobs, and learned a few things along the way. But I'll start by saying that being interviewed is a skill like many others and can be worked on to improve. If you need to do so, do an internet search for organizations that work with people to improve their chances of getting a job. This may include sprucing up your resume and teaching you real-world techniques to use or not use when on an interview. This may cost you a few bucks but could be well worth it for you.

    Now, some of what I learned is that you decide on who to interview based upon qualifications but you select people you like for the job. How do you make sure the person interviewing you will like you? Pay attention to everything that the person says. Don't make common mistakes. I always had pictures of my family on my desk, my wife and my five children. An applicant who, when asked about his personal life, started by saying how he hates kids and never wants any is probably not going to get on my good side easily. Try to be likable but not overly pushy. At this point I will add that possibly those saying that your bosses really don't want you to leave your current job may be right. So the answer to advancing yourself might be that you need to look for higher level jobs at another company. You may have to decide which is better for you, staying where you are comfortable but never advancing, or taking the risk of leaving and going to a new and somewhat unknown environment. Job hopping is not viewed favorably by most companies, but staying too long in one place at one job may be seen as indicative of someone that is too stuck in their ways to adjust to a new position.

    Prior to the interview, learn what you can about the company and the position for which you are applying. Remember that they are looking for someone that will enhance the mission of the company, and only secondarily interested in what you want and need. You want to show how you will add value, not stress how good the new job will be for you (which frankly, the interviewer has little or no interest in).

    During the interview, ask about what the company is expecting the person to accomplish, or what skills are most important to the organization. Then when answering questions about your work history, skills, education, etc. try to relate them to what the company is hoping the new position will achieve. Especially if the position you are seeking is a supervisory level job, technical skills will not be basis upon which a selection is made. They will likely take your technical skills as a given, based upon your resume and background. They will be deciding how well you can organize and manage other people, how well you might be working as part of a team, and/or building a team with those you supervise. Working into the conversation other aspects of your life where you led people, such as when you were in the military, or holding a position in a social or fraternal organization, can be a real world example of how you have succeeded as a leader.

    And don't forget that an impression is made in the first few seconds that you walk in for the interview. Being dressed cleanly and appropriately, in part to show that you take the interview as an important moment in your life. Showing up with food or coffee stains on your shirt tells the interviewer that this interview is not very important for you, not important enough to try to look your very best. Be a few minutes early for the scheduled interview. Never, ever show up late no matter the reason. Better to call and ask if the interview can be rescheduled rather than being even a minute late. Avoid having anything in your appearance that might prejudice the interviewer against you. Some folks look down on others with tattoos, for example, fairly or not. If you have tattoos, make sure that they are covered discreetly. Don't have clothing or a belt buckle or anything with a logo or otherwise indicating some preference in your life. The interviewer might hate motorcycles, so wearing a Harley shirt or having a Harley cap on when you enter the office may get you off to a bad start.

    That's about it for now, this post is already longer than I intended. My final advice is not lie or exaggerate your skills or background. Getting a job is not much of an accomplishment if you are fired shortly afterwards because you grossly inflated what you are capable of doing. Portray yourself in the best way possible, but without outright fakery. Good luck.
     
  20. GeorgiaGlocker

    GeorgiaGlocker Romans 10:9

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    I can think of several other things I would rather do than sit for an interview. I think how it goes does depend somewhat on the person doing the interview. Some are very good at it and some not so much.