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Not counting a single stage mounted to your bench...does anybody else here use just one progressive press for everything? I seem to be in the minority who does caliber and primer conversions when I need to. My line of thinking is I'd rather spend the money I save on a second press setup on more components.

Anybody else here run just one press for everything or do you have multiple setups for different calibers?

(Not meant as a judgemental post. I am honestly just curious)
 
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I have five presses. Dillon 1050, 550, Redding T7, Forster Coax and RCBS Rockchucker. Each tool has a purpose. Almost bought another press to be a dedicated .40 press and then just decided to convert the 1050 from 9mm to .40 for the summer.

In the past the 1050 was a dedicated 9mm machine and the 550 was the quick change press for about everything else. Others presses are used for precision rifle.
 

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I have 4 Mec shotgun presses, 650, LM, and RC. The Load Master sits in the corner now. I use the RC for depriming live primers and using the Lee Auto Drum on it for doing any different powder testing. But load on the 650. I have 5 complete tool heads, some extra powder bars set for different powders and throws. Two complete priming assemblies. All loading is done on the 650 now. Have Redding competition bullet seating dies on all of the tool heads. So if I want to try a different bullet easy to change and back to the original setting. But really the only press I need is the 650.
 

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I have several shotgun presses; 10,12 and 410. I need to add a 20 and 28 gauge to the mix. 2 SS presses; a Lyman Spar-T and a RCBS Big Max press. And one 550 Dillon.

I will work up a load on one of the SS presses and then switch that load to the 550. Most of the rifle brass is sized using a SS press. I load mainly lead in my rifles so a Lyman M-die resides in station 1.
 

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550 & 650 & SS press.
 

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I have one 550 and one 1050, and basically use the 1050 for everything at this time. But I'm mostly a volume guy, without much variety.

Flexibility is the 550's strength, vs. volume for the 1050. Another thought would be the possibility of doing multiple runs on a 1050. For example, de-capping prior to wet tumbling brass.
 

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Another thought would be the possibility of doing multiple runs on a 1050. For example, de-capping prior to wet tumbling brass.
It was not my original intention, but one of my 1050s has never loaded a round of ammunition. It has been used only for brass processing. That may still change one of these days.
 

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If I was doing something where wet tumbling mattered, I'd probably set up a 1050 like that too.
Just another reason a 650 works better than a 550. The 650 is better than a 550 but not as great as a 1050, but is faster and easier to do conversions. and cheaper.
 

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Just another reason a 650 works better than a 550. The 650 is better than a 550 but not as great as a 1050, but is faster and easier to do conversions. and cheaper.
The 550 is more flexible than the 650, and the 1050 is way more robust than the 650. So I guess maybe someone who wants to shoot 25k/year total of 3 pistol calibers and really cares about the cost difference might be better off with a 650.

But if you want to shoot 50k/year of 1 caliber, use a motor to run brass, or just want the enjoyment of a better, more stable press, the 1050 is where it's at.

For noodling around with small amounts of ammo in a variety of calibers, I don't care that much about auto-indexing. So the 550 is OK for that.
 

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I have a bunch of Dillon presses. But if I had to decide on just one for all calibers, I would keep a 1050. The 550s are awesome, but without the ability to swage out primer crimps while reloading and not seating primers on the downstroke is a deal breaker.
 

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The 550 is more flexible than the 650, and the 1050 is way more robust than the 650. So I guess maybe someone who wants to shoot 25k/year total of 3 pistol calibers and really cares about the cost difference might be better off with a 650.

But if you want to shoot 50k/year of 1 caliber, use a motor to run brass, or just want the enjoyment of a better, more stable press, the 1050 is where it's at.

For noodling around with small amounts of ammo in a variety of calibers, I don't care that much about auto-indexing. So the 550 is OK for that.
I was sort of referring to if you want to wet clean and remove the spent primer beforehand. What is the better press, the 550 or 650. For me after loading 20 years on a 550 and about the same on the 650.I think the 650 is way more visartal. For robust I have a friend that has over a million rds loaded on a 650. But now he has two 650 and two 1050 and one is motor driven. With bullet and case feeders on each one. At double the price I should hope it is more robust. But for my needs at about 20,000 rds. a year give or take over the last 20 years, the 650 has worked out for me over the 550. Just never could pull the hammer on a 1050.
 

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I was sort of referring to if you want to wet clean and remove the spent primer beforehand. What is the better press, the 550 or 650. For me after loading 20 years on a 550 and about the same on the 650.I think the 650 is way more visartal. For robust I have a friend that has over a million rds loaded on a 650. But now he has two 650 and two 1050 and one is motor driven. With bullet and case feeders on each one. At double the price I should hope it is more robust. But for my needs at about 20,000 rds. a year give or take over the last 20 years, the 650 has worked out for me over the 550. Just never could pull the hammer on a 1050.
Don't know if I'll ever get to the point of using a motor, but would definitely prefer the 1050 over the 650 for that.

I loaded around 30k/year on my 550 for about 5 years before going to the 1050. I've used 650's too, but to me the stability of the 1050 is worth the cost difference, especially spread out over a period of time.

At maybe 40k/year, I'm not anywhere near a high-volume shooter. But given I'm not switching calibers, the 1050 is more enjoyable to use. 1 million total rounds is probably more than I'll shoot in my entire career.
 

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I had one press for a long time, a Lee 3 hole turret.

I used it for everything and had a turret setup for each caliber.

When it needed to be replaced I bought a single stage and a new 4 hole turret press.

I am doing handguns on the turret press and rifle calibers on the single stage.

Certain calibers I just prefer to do one stage at a time On a single stage. I rarely sit down and load a rifle round from start to finish in one sitting. I’ll prep 600 cases. Then size and prime them. Then when I want to shoot I’ll sit down and load a couple dozen of whatever load I’m playing with that day.
 
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