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Do you process your own or have it done (deer/elk)?

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by NDGlock, Oct 6, 2003.

  1. NDGlock

    NDGlock OIF2, KFOR12

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    I clean my own pheasants obviously but when it comes to butchering deer, I have never done the whole thing. I used to help my uncle skin them and process them on my Grandpa's farm. I used help Dad process beef so I figure it is pretty much the same.

    The past few years have been short on time for deer in ND. I only get one tag so usually it is get a doe, get it to a local butcher and pick up the sausage/jerky a few weeks later.

    However, I think part of the experience is learning to do the whole thing on your own if you have access to facilities/tools.

    What do you prefer/do?
     
  2. Guest

    I process it myself if the weather is cool/cold. If it's really hot out in the field, I'll get it to the butcher asap.
     

  3. vafish

    vafish

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    I do my own. Even when I shoot deer in August :)

    Nothing fancy, I have an electric grinder that used to belong to my mother in law. It's 30 or 40 years old, still works great.

    I cut out the back straps and tenderloins, cut some of the rear legs into steaks and strips for jerky and grind the rest. To make the Jerky I marinate thin strips in Soy Vay terriaki sauce for 24 hours, then put them on a rack in the oven on low heat for 12 hours.
     
  4. PzGren

    PzGren

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    You can also get a nice roast by leaving a chunk overnight in buttermilk, it takes some of the strong taste away.

    The longer you can hang the carcass, the softer the tough fibers get, though, and a butcher can really help with a refrigerator where the meat can hang.
     
  5. noway

    noway

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    whoever takes their meat to the butcher, shop on avg how much do they charge you?
    ( by the pound or what they do for you)

    Here in SoFLA, Big Ed's Butcher shop in Royal Palm, does a good job on wild game.The price avgs out to alittle bit under $40.00 (IIRC). He cuts and grinds your meats and wraps them just like the local grocery meat shop. He also weighs & prints the weights on indivdual pkgs.
     
  6. MrMunster

    MrMunster

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    I haven't hunted deer the past 2 years, but the butcher I used to go to charged me $50 to process the deer. Specialty stuff, like sausages, was extra. Usually cost me about $90 total since I typically got about 40lbs of specialty stuff.

    Since I would have taken meat to him anyway to get the specialty stuff done, I figured it was worth $50 to get the rest of the meat cut, wrapped, and frozen.
     
  7. knuckle dragger

    knuckle dragger NSAWC

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    I have done both with deer and elk..i have a friend that is a butcher and he has helped me do it myself..but i prefer to have it professionally done. just because its labeled and packaged better than i do it..
     
  8. paynter2

    paynter2 It ain't over Millennium Member

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    I do my own. I have a meat saw (hand) - that helps in quartering the animal. I bone the entire thing out. Even the ribs.

    Tenderloins, round steak, rump roasts and the rest I grind into hamburger. I grind it myself.

    It doesn't take very long to bone one out and wrap it. The Hamburger takes a while - setup and clean-up. I mix a little pork into it for 'binder'.

    I would prefer to take the hamburger meat to the butcher. However, I don't want it mixed with some other critter - I don't know how the other critter was handled.

    My butcher is a good friend. I will take a quarter to be dried once in a while. I know I get mine back - at least that's what he tells me...
     
  9. TriggerTripper

    TriggerTripper

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    We (the people I hunt with) always do our own. We usually let the animal hang for a week after the hunt and then get everyone together and form a big assembly line to cut, clean, wrap, and mark the packages. It don't take alot of tools just a couple sharp knifes, some freezer wrap, a black marker and lots of tape. We once did four elk in one day.

    It's not real hard to do, just remeber that with deer and elk you don't want to cut through any bones, the marrow will give the meat the really wild (and nasty) taste. A lot of butchers will do that as it is standard operating procedure with beef, but with wild game it really ruins the meat. If you take it to one be sure tell them you want it boned out. Also be sure to clean all the hair off too, one or two hairs can ruin the whole roast. It's a little work but well worth it, plus while you have everyone together, it's a great time to plan your next trip!
     
  10. noway

    noway

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    { A lot of butchers will do that as it is standard operating procedure with beef, but with wild game it really ruins the meat. If you take it to one be sure tell them you want it boned out. Also be sure to clean all the hair off too, one or two hairs can ruin the whole roast.}

    I'm curious on how you de-bone out the meat? (Specially the ribs area)
    I alot of game and domestic animals IMHO cooks better with the bone in ( goat/lamb/short pork rib/beef ribs ) That's one area on most game that I handle that I dislike.

    As far as the hair, my old-generation family members used to shave their hogs prior to final quatering and the splitting the animal. I still find it amusing to watch you're Granpa pull out a straight blade and start shaving the hairs off a hog. It was a pretty quick proccess and quite funny. What other hairs he couldn't reach with the blade where burned off. The hog then goes thru a scrub down of the skin.
     
  11. BrianDamage

    BrianDamage YouTalkin'ToMe?

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    I have been having it done, but I bought some videos form Cabelas last year that explain it REALLY well. One video was on field dressing and care of the deer, and the other was how to completely butcher it (the guy doing it says he prefers to completely debone the deer, as it will help keep the meat form tasting bad (along with completely removing any and all traces of fat))

    I may still carry some of the already cut meat to the butcher ...they're Mennonites and make the best summer sausage and German bologna I've ever had
     
  12. BrianDamage

    BrianDamage YouTalkin'ToMe?

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    the video I mentioned above the guy in it says he never uses the meat between the ribs....claims there's not enough to fool with, and bacteria gets in there really quick (especially when warm)
     
  13. paynter2

    paynter2 It ain't over Millennium Member

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    Deboned meat takes up much less room in your freezer too.

    To remove the meat from the ribs, I just run a sharp knife up one side and down the other. It all goes into a box (with while plastic bag) of meat to be ground. Yes, there is very little meat there. I don't always bother with it - the dog likes it.
     
  14. TriggerTripper

    TriggerTripper

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    I don't do alot with the ribs, like paynter2 said, there's not alot there. I usually slice off what i can and use it for a crock pot stew.