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Do the polymer frames every breakdown due to age?

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by seamaster, Jan 20, 2010.

  1. seamaster

    seamaster

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    I'm asking because I recently bought a used Glock and I'm curious...do the frames breakdown with age, exposure to sunlight, chemicals, etc?

    Thanks,
    Seamaster
     
  2. raven11

    raven11

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    haven't seen it happen , i have a Walther made with plastic grips from 1984 and they still look brand new
     

  3. FLglockdude

    FLglockdude

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    If it takes a plastic bag 100 years to degrade in a land fill, I think a polymer frame would last indefinitely if it was cared for properly.
     
  4. Steel Head

    Steel Head Tactical Cat

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    My well abused 1990 G22 seem to do ok:whistling:
     
  5. trlcavscout

    trlcavscout

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    My first Glock was a G22 LE trade in, it was 17 years old and after a VERY GOOD cleaning it looked like new.
     
  6. frankmako

    frankmako

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    don't think so. they will out last you.
     
  7. Javelin

    Javelin Got Glock? Silver Member

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    Polymer > steel

    That is all.
     
  8. Brian Lee

    Brian Lee Drop those nuts

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    While it's true that plastics degrade from exposure to UV light, direct sunlight would need a very very long time (a lot longer than you'll live) to do noticeable damage to a Glock frame, and your gun will just never see that much exposure. To really hurt one, you'd need to set it on a table, very close to a very strong artificial UV light source, and leave it there for months, if not years. You've surely seen how plastic headlight covers on cars turn yellow after a few years, but that's because of spending so much time so close to the Halogen light source when the lights are on. (You'd burn your hand holding it so close to a Halogen bulb, right?) Sunlight isn't what causes those covers to turn yellow.

    It's actually more realistic to worry about your metal guns turning to rust, or breaking from metal fatigue, than it is to worry about the plastic in a Glock going bad on you. Glocks are made from one brand or another of Nylon 66, which is very resistant to most nasty chemicals. Nylon 66 is the same stuff used on plastic lawn and garden equipment like weed whackers and lawn mowers, where they expect that you might spill gasoline on it. Gun oils and commercial gun cleaning solvents are no problem.
     
  9. Butch

    Butch RetiredDinosaur CLM Millennium Member

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    I got my first G17 in the spring of 1986. Back then the anti-Glockers said the frames would turn to dust in ten years. After ten years they said it would be twenty years. Well, after 130,000 rounds (give or take 20 or 30 thousand), the steel slide finally cracked.....I'm still using the frame and barrel.

    You need not worry.....go shoot! :)
     
  10. HAMMERHEAD

    HAMMERHEAD

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    Even cheap plastics last for decades, Glock plastic is good to go.
    Ultra violet light is the main destroyer of plastics, I'm sure Glock uses plenty of UV stabilizers.
     
  11. Butch

    Butch RetiredDinosaur CLM Millennium Member

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    Did someone say Nylon 66?

    [​IMG]

    They were made sometime before the end of 1987, and mine still works. :)
     
  12. 481

    481

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    Remington's Nylon 66 rifles (produced from late 1958 through 1990) and Glocks share the same polyamide resin (also known as Nylon 66 for which Remington named their rifle) in their respective constructions.

    That means that the Nylon 66 used in the manufacture of Remington's Nylon 66 rifles, depending upon the age of the specimen being considered, is somewhere on the order of 20 to 52 years old. The Nylon 66 used in Remington's rifles is somewhat less refined by way of additives advancements than the Nylon 66 that currently exists in our Glocks and both examples continue to serve admirably as designed.

    Certainly there will be degradation of both examples with the passage of time, but that degradation will be perceptible over large multi-decade (even centuries, perhaps?) time frames and I expect that long before we see our Glocks become embrittled by by time alone, they will be passed onto our children's children and their children's children.

    When we see rifles and pistols made of wood and crude, unrefined (by today's standards) steel that date from the 16th and 17th centuries that remain functional even today, is it unreasonable to believe that our guns will see such longevity?

    Quite frankly, I think that maintained properly, any high quality gun (Glocks, HKs, 1911s, etc.) produced today will see serviceable capacity well into several generations of one's family should it be passed down, modern polymers being no exception to the estimate.
     
  13. tampashooters

    tampashooters Shellback

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    I meant 30....:rofl:
     
  14. Gallium

    Gallium CLM

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    My 1st gen and 2nd gen and 3rd gen and 3.5gen (RTF) and now new incoming 4th gen G17s all seem to have weathered the plastic storm. :)

    Think I'll shoot the 1st gen today another coupla hundred rounds...

    'Drew
     
  15. Quiet

    Quiet Casino Goon

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    The first polymer framed pistols (H&K VP70) have not degraded and they've been around for about 40 years now.

    The ones I've handle/shot in the last 2-3 years are still durable and have not broken down due to age.