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Do I really need partitions?

Discussion in 'Tech Talk' started by Wulfenite, Dec 30, 2006.

  1. Wulfenite

    Wulfenite The King

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    Whilst preparing to set up my new HDD I read some guide on the web that suggested a 4gig partition for the OS, another for the programs, then 1 or many more to organize other stuff.

    Well I set mine up with a 4 gig partition for the OS, 24 for the programs and the rest for stuff and I'm already regreting it.

    Things keep installing themselves in the OS partition and now its full and giving me error messages. I'm thinking of reformating the disk and starting over again without partitions or with maybe perhaps just 2, 1 for the os and programs and another for data files that get backed up.

    Any suggestions?
     
  2. HAVOC

    HAVOC Remember CLM Millennium Member

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    If you run an OS partition you need to make a point of installing stuff to another partition, and not keeping all of your pictures and music in My Documents on C:.

    Feel free to reformat, but you can probably solve your problems moving your multimedia stuff and page file to another partition.

    I go back and forth about the whole multiple partition thing, and how I set up a particular machine mostly depends on my mood at the time. A single partition is more convenient to make and operate, but multiple partitions gives you more flexibility. Normally when I go multi, I set up the boot partition to about 10GB 1/3 of the drive's capacity, whatever is bigger, to avoid the very problem you're having if I get lazy with data management.
     

  3. Wulfenite

    Wulfenite The King

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    Thanks,

    I'm moving from a 40 gig to a 100. I think I'll start over. Maybe go with a 35/65 split. Then if (When!) I get sloppy all I have to really do is make sure the data I want backed is saving to the 65 side.

    I guess I'll be going away for a couple hours...for the third time. :brickwall: :brickwall: :brickwall:
     
  4. Wulfenite

    Wulfenite The King

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    Posting from the desk top now. Apparently its not as easy as all that. It doesnt want to let go of its OS hold on that 4gig C drive partition...so I'm installing xp on the other partition hoping it will then let me delete the 4gig C partition. Its like one of those sliding tile puzzles only it takes a half an hour and 2 reboots to slide a tile. :brickwall: :brickwall: :brickwall: :brickwall: :brickwall: :brickwall: :brickwall: :brickwall: :brickwall: :brickwall: Did I mention I have a headache going on day 3 now.

    "Dear Sweet Little Tiny Christmas Baby Jesus, I promise if you help me fix this properly I'll never again order a computer with less than the largest size of drive available."
     
  5. Bronson7

    Bronson7

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    My understanding on that method is when your data goes south, it leaves your OS in tact, but it slows down your system a tad. I could be wrong here. I've never had a real need to create a separate partition for the OS.
    Bronson7
     
  6. Philipp2

    Philipp2

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    I got in the habit of multiple partitions when I set up our office machines a few years ago with NT as the OS. it required a primary boot partition of 2 Gb IIRC. I used Partition Magic to manage them and have not been without a copy since. If you spend a few bucks on the newest version of Partition Magic, you can make new partitions, move them, resize them, etc without fear. I recently had my C: drive crash and lost pretty much everything on it. Luckely my data and junk partitions were unharmed, So I bought a new HD, formatted it and reinstalled all of my software, moved the data from the old HD and kept on going with about one day's loss. If the HD had been running on only one partition, everything would have been lost that was not backed up elsewhere.
     
  7. NetNinja

    NetNinja Always Faithful

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    30Gb C:

    The rest on D:

    Actually your OS is what goes south and you can pretty much recover most if not all your Pics and Docs from your D: partition.

    Just slave the drive if you ever need to recover from an OS failure.

    I just started a new job and for the life of me I have no idea why in they hell they built Windows 2003 servers with 6GB C: partitions.

    Now guess what, they are running dangerously close to full.

    Most of it is secuirty and service pack updates.

    30GB is a safe bet.

    Oh and since 90% of Virus's attack the OS isn't it nice to scan a 30gb partition than a big ol 100GB C: :)

    But like Havoc says you need to make a point of installing programs to the D: partition. Just do custom installs and change the default C:/Program Files/Porgram install to D:

    Pretty simple.
     
  8. neeko

    neeko

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    Don't forget your gigabyte+ pagefile resides on your OS parition by default. 4GB may not be enough.
     
  9. lens

    lens

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    4GB will never be enough.

    Even if you install every app to D, every Windows app drops a ton of DLLs and other system files in the C:\Windows\<various subfolders> and these start chewing up space in big gobs.

    Add the fact that you need to have a Swap file on the C drive and you will screw yourself unless you have >10GB partition.

    I no longer partition my HDDs, but if I felt the urge, I would make C no less than 30GB and I'd use Partition Magic to manage things if necessary.
     
  10. Wulfenite

    Wulfenite The King

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    I've got 35 on the C drive and 60 on the D. I think that will work. Now if I could get MS Updates to Behaive.....
     
  11. Tennessee Slim

    Tennessee Slim Señor Member CLM

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    Invest in some sort of backup device (NAS, external HDD, rewritable DVD, etc) and partition it any way you damn well please.
     
  12. neeko

    neeko

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    Good advice.
     
  13. Darkmage

    Darkmage

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    Yeah, I learned that the hard way. I now have a network backup for the documents, pictures, songs, etc.

    I have a 10 GB partition for the OS and a couple of times I've had to wipe and recover it. It's much easier to do that than to wipe and recover an entire disk. Barring catastrophic hard drive failure, a separate partition for the OS solves a lot of problems. Nasty, vicious problems that will make you tear your hair out.
     
  14. malkore

    malkore

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    4gb was fine in Win98 days...but who had a 100gig drive then!?

    as it stands, XP with all the patches, service packs, IE 7, plus an Office installation...eats up almost 3 gig on its own.

    my new pc has a 350gig drive. 100gig for C:, the rest for D: and then i have an old IDE drive with 80gig for backups.
     
  15. Hokie

    Hokie NRA Member

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    In case you do not know you can easily move the location of the My Documents folder. On you start menu right click on My documents then select properties. On the Target tab you can but a new location. Also there is a move button to move every think in the C: drive My Documents to the new My Documents. Any thing that defults to My Documents will now go to the new location.
     
  16. Wulfenite

    Wulfenite The King

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    Neet trick...thanks!
     
  17. Tennessee Slim

    Tennessee Slim Señor Member CLM

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    If you really want a tiny C: drive, it also is possible to relocate the “Program Files” folder (using a “junction” point) and the page file to another partition. Unfortunately, I have yet to find a means of moving the hibernation file to an alternate location.