Do i need an inspection on a new construction home?

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by wrx04, Feb 7, 2013.

  1. wrx04

    wrx04

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    I just signed the purchase agreement to a newly built home. I put in the contract that i want a home inspection. This was the response from the seller to my agent:

    Home inspection on new construction?
    Go ahead, please let buyers know we have gone through 19 inspections from the municipality and we have the C of O. The Builder will not accept a report of any kind from whoever they bring in. The detail crew begins tomorrow morning. Normally no one is allowed in when they begin detailing the house. All their supplies will be in the home, they will also arrive about 8:30am. Please do not discuss any concern with the crew.


    My parents and my agent say that they personally wouldnt pay for an inspection on a new build. I think $320 is cheap compared to spending $xxx,xxx and getting a lemon. What do you guys think? Am i throwing away $320 by doing an inspection on a new build? Anyone in the home-building/inspection industry that can offer some insight?

    Thanks
     
  2. certifiedfunds

    certifiedfunds Cosmopolitan Bias

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  3. stolenphot0

    stolenphot0 RTF2 Addict

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    Generally speaking you are not wasting your time if you have an inspector that knows what he is doing. I have roofed and sided new construction homes, that were listed for $299,000+ that were so far out of square they would have had to tear the foundation out to fix them.

    But at that point, what's the point? Most builders won't incur that cost, and you'll have long legal battles to get them to fix it.
     
  4. GreenDrake

    GreenDrake Rip Lips

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    Yes, but also see if you can get a builder's warranty in writing.
     
  5. certifiedfunds

    certifiedfunds Cosmopolitan Bias

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    Better than that hire a plumber roofer electrician to inspect
     
  6. coastal4974

    coastal4974

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  7. wrx04

    wrx04

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    It would give me the choice to walk. Would an inspector be able to tell that from a 2 hour walk around?
     
  8. wrx04

    wrx04

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    One year builders warranty (in writing) is included
     
  9. wrx04

    wrx04

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    This is definitely the best idea......wonder how much that would cost?
     
  10. okie

    okie GT Mayor

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    I would get an inspection for sure my friend:supergrin:
     
  11. md2lgyk

    md2lgyk

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    I've owned ten homes, about half of them new construction. Never did I get an inspection on the new ones. There were always plenty of other homes built by the same company to check out for quality of construction. But in any case, if you're already signed a purchase agreement, it's likely too late.
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2013
  12. stolenphot0

    stolenphot0 RTF2 Addict

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    Most aren't generally qualified. Unless they have a history of building houses they will miss it. You can only learn so much from a 4 hour Saturday class. Easiest way is to use the 3,4,5 rule. Measure three feet on one wall and mark it. Measure four feet on another wall and mark it. Measure across the marks and that should be right at 5 feet. If it's not then you have a problem.

    http://mikelindstrom.wordpress.com/2007/01/22/getting-things-square-with-the-world-3-4-5-triangles/

    When we sold our last house, the buyers' inspector told us we had moisture around the toilet. I told him no kidding, it's a bowl of water. I had to pull the toilet and prove there wasn't a wet floor under it. Wasting an hour.
     
  13. boozer

    boozer

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    Municipal inspections only verify the build meets code. Not the quality of the build.

    "The Builder will not accept a report of any kind from whoever they bring in."

    Of course not, they don't want any deficiencies exposed. Why wouldn't they say "We welcome any inspection", if they weren't concerned about problems being discussed.

    OK.

    Sellers are worried you are using inspection to back ot of the deal.

    Builders are worried an inspection is going to cost them money on some trivial matter.

    $320 seems like a small amount to watch out for you interests.
     
  14. GreenDrake

    GreenDrake Rip Lips

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    Good, I have seen them implied then disregarded, getting in in writing is critical, as well as a one year follow up walk through.
     
  15. jfost11

    jfost11

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    This was my feeling as well. Sure, they had to have all the inspections done at various points throughout the construction but, that doesn't mean the county/city inspector knows his butt from a hole in the ground.

    Plus, I have seen several crooks build homes and charge for items like energy saving, gas-filled windows and then install plain windows on 3/4 of the house. I've done clearing and grading work in developments where $600K houses were framed up in a week by a Mexican framing crew and not one single rafter was even close to level or the same length. And after seeing a few Holmes on Homes episodes, just up to code isn't that great sometimes.
     
  16. clinttho

    clinttho

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    No, you don't. In my state you wouldn't need one, as a builder must have separate inspections on the foundation, framing, electrical, etc. done and approved throughout the process of building it. Then, a final inspection must be approved and signed off before completion

    Any additional inspection is not necessary if the inspectors have done their job.

    Added- the inspectors check the work and make sure the code is up to snuff. In my experience there are thorough inspectors and not so thorough ones. But generally they do their job around here.

    If you want a second opinion and plan to hire someone independently to look at the house for your peace of mind it may be worthwhile. Having another govt employed inspector would be a waste for sure.

    Outdoor Hub mobile, the outdoor information engine
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2013
  17. Adjuster

    Adjuster

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    I would have it inspected without question. Thats a huge investment and the inspection is minimal cost. Maybe you can find an inspector that is experienced or specializes in new construction.

    /
     
  18. boozer

    boozer

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    Inspectors are looking for certain items.

    You are correct, they aren't looking to see if the correct windows are installed.

    Will a $50 an hour home inspector notice either?
     
  19. Stock Perfection

    Stock Perfection

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    I have a new hero in this arena: Mike Holmes (has a tv show). Friggin love that guy, sounds just like my uncle.
    He would demand a thorough inspection of the entire property, sewers to lightning rod, including boundry lines and rights-of-way etc.
    Do your reaserch, check alot of references, and pay the money now instead of being sorry later.
    Good luck!
     
  20. That's all Brother

    That's all Brother

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    I was a building inspector for 20 years. If the county inspector did his job you shouldn't need another. I know sometimes it's not feasable, but the same inspector should follow your house from start to finish, we always tried our best to do that. There are things that are now covered up. A "home inspector" couldn't do a complete inspection, but he could see enough to put your mind at ease. There are ways to see at least 80% of the home. A camera snake is a great tool that any inspector should have. I would have the panel box looked at, and the plumbing, I have found many drain lines that have serious reverse slope, and studor vents improperly installed. Too many other things to mention. The county Inspector is there for codes only, cosmetic and finishes is left up the the builder and the homeowner. The punch list is your friend.
    Yes Mike Holmes knows the codes. He is very good at what he does.
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2013