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Infidel USA
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1,622 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have received a few requests about how to round-off the Glock trigger guard. I had posted these instructions over a year ago, and they don't appear to be available any longer. So, I'm reposting with a pictorial guide.

My G17 is great. It has never missed a beat and has functioned 100%. As for accuracy, the sights are directly on point of aim at 15 paces. It is my go-to pistol for any occasion. The only thing I didn’t like about the pistol is how it looked. I know that “looks” should be totally inconsequential to function, but it’s my pistol, and I’ll make it look the way I want.

I don’t have a problem with the grip. It’s perfect for my large hands, so “grip-reduction” is not necessary. What I don’t like is the Glock’s profile. I just don’t like the way it looks. It’s the trigger-guard “nose” that is the object of this post. I have seen posts that show the trigger-guard with a re-shaped nose. I like the look of a rounded trigger-guard. I don’t wrap my weak hand finger around the trigger-guard, so removing the nose will not affect function. In the posts I’ve seen, the posters show pictures, but they are generally “before and after” examples.

So, to possibly help others, I decided to take some in-process photos to show the procedure. My pistol turned out exactly as I had envisioned. It now looks as if the pistol was made with a rounded trigger guard instead of a square nose. I was even able to leave some of the original Glock knurling on the front of the rounded trigger-guard. The job is certainly not difficult, and if done with patience, your efforts will be rewarded.

• Please note that the most important “tool” is the masking tape. Use it to lay out your plan and to protect areas you do not want to contact during grinding and sanding.
• The thickness of the vertical part of the trigger-guard is a little thicker than the horizontal part. Be aware of this when you blend the curve.
• Be careful not to sand the sides of the trigger-guard. You will not be able to match the existing finish. This is not so critical of the sanded curve. Using the masking tape will limit how far you sand along the vertical and horizontal planes. This does make a difference.

PHOTOS…
1. Mask off the areas that you do NOT want to sand.
2. This is the point of no return. The grinder is handy, but don’t take off too much.
3. The intended curve is evident and the grinder can be put away. Put it away. Now. Back away from the grinder.
4. Re-mask if you need to use the grinder any further.
5. Hand sanding from here on out. Note the blending of the curve from vertical to horizontal.
6. Slow and steady. Wet the area to see your progress. Continually check the curve blend.
7. 98% finished. I want to do a little more finish sanding with a fine emory board tomorrow, but really nothing that will be noticeable.
8. It’s done. This is the Glock profile I prefer. (And, before you jump on it, the lettering is going back to black.)





 

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Good Post.
I've done both of my Glocks also.
I undercut the trigger guard and broke all of the edges where ever I could feel an edge or if my finger got sore while shooting.
When I finished sanding I then Glass Bead Blasted the frame to blend everything into a nice satin matt finish.
 

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Very nice man. Thanks for posting. Makes me want to break the Dremel out. Would like to know, does the finish appear dark black after the sanding/grinding? Wondering how it looks up close. I have three Glocks (20,27, and 35) that I would like to do this on. I hate the square trigger guards.
 

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Infidel USA
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Very nice man. Thanks for posting. Makes me want to break the Dremel out. Would like to know, does the finish appear dark black after the sanding/grinding? Wondering how it looks up close. I have three Glocks (20,27, and 35) that I would like to do this on. I hate the square trigger guards.
The frame is black all the way through. I polish the curve to a shine.
 

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Infidel USA
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1,622 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Does the surface of the frame where it was changed look like the surrounding plastic?
The sides of the frame are textured, that's why you must not sand the sides.

Note the areas that are taped off. The front is sanded up to the lower finger-placement area (photo #6), and the bottom is sanded back to where the curve becomes horizontal (photo #4).

When you fine sand and polish the removed area, it blends very well into the bottom (photo #9) and it perfectly ends abruptly at the vertical finger notches.

If you do it correctly, it will look like it came from Glock. Good luck.
 

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Infidel USA
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1,622 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Looks great ! What did you use for the final finish to match the original ?
The frame is solid black all the way through.

There is no color change.

When you sand, it will look gray because of the dust and roughness. If you finish it out with very fine emory cloth and some Flitz, it will be glossy.

The gloss doesn't stay unless you polish it. The resulting black is exactly the same as the frame, without the texture.
 

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Excellant video. I did my G26, 19, 17 and 36 this week. What did you use to finish, emery cloth (grit?) etc. I used one of wife's emery boards but it's not smooth, though it's good enough for SD and range. Thanks for the tutorial.
 

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Fisher of Men
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360 Posts
I use emery cloth on mine and then rub very briskly with one of those green pan scrubbers in order to restore the surface to a look that blends in with the rest of the pistol. When this is finished the refinished area looks just a little dull. I put a dab of Tetra gun grease on it and rub it in thoroughly and wipe off the excess. It looks great. I have done my 30SF & 27. I leave the top 5 rows of factory stippling on the front of the trigger guard and then below that I start removing material and leave a nice radius where the transition is made from the cut to the triggerguard. I wrap emery cloth around a chain saw file to accomplish this radius. If I could figure out how to post a picture on here I would show a picture. I also undercut the back of the triggerguard and blend in the hump.
 

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Dave, I used my Dremel Tool to cut the trigger guard higher up the frame being careful not to thin out the trigger guard too much. I will have to get some emery cloth to really smoot the left over as I just used an emery board from my bride to smooth the trigger guard.:cool:
 

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Fisher of Men
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The thing here is you don't want to get reckless and remove too much. For that reason, I only use a Dremel to rough cut the excess material form the snout, hook or whatever you want to call that grotesque thing Glock puts on the triggerguard. After that I go strictly to hand tools using primarily different grades of emery cloth. You never get the cut with the Dremel absolutely correct so it is better to leave things full and then carefully finish your work. For the life of me, I really don't know why Glock doesn't round off the triggerguard. Then again, I've heard that Gaston is a bit obstinate. If only we could find a way to plant the idea in his mind and make him believe it was actually his idea. This is how you get engineers to change things. It has to be their idea.
 
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