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DIY Glock Trigger Job

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by splashdown, Jan 2, 2005.

  1. splashdown

    splashdown nra member

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    How many of us think we're geniuses with the Glock because it is so simple and there are so many places on the web that we can learn from? C'mon, a show of hands, mine's up. So how many of you have done your own trigger jobs? How light can you get the trigger with 100% reliable function? I've worked on mine and I'm disappointed that I had two light strikes in 100 rounds with Win White Box.

    Here's what I have done:
    Polished internal contact surfaces with medium/fine knife sharpening stone and 10x loupe. Under 10x magnification I can see all the pits and nastiness from the factory. I can polish it smooth and keep it square. I did this where the trigger bar pushes the firing pin stop up. I did this on the contact surface between criciform/striker. I also did it where the end of the trigger bar is cammed down by the connector. Where the flat of the trigger bar and connector rub, I have polished the contact surfaces with flitz.

    I installed and fitted the 3.5 lb Ghost Rocket. I filed it until it would [dry] fire and then just a little more.

    I installed the Wolff reduced power striker spring.

    Any advice on a) getting the reliability to 100%, and b) getting the trigger lighter?

    Thanks.
     
  2. WalterGA

    WalterGA Millennium Member

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    (1) Don't "polish" with a sharpening stone and (2) remove reduced power striker spring. (duh!)
     

  3. VN350X10

    VN350X10

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    You didn't say what model Glock it is.
    I've found that the reduced power spring on the striker is O.K. on small frames, but not reliable on the large frame guns, possibly due to the larger, heavier striker that it's pushing.
    I've gotten small frames down to 2 1/4 lbs, but the large frames seem to lose reliability below 3 lbs.


    uncle albert
     
  4. splashdown

    splashdown nra member

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    I did replace the original striker spring. I got the idea from a Glockmeister table showing trigger pull weight for various combinations of springs. I realize it is just an example and there are no claims of reliability.

    This is being done to a G19. I am experimenting for now with a possible future purchase of a 17,34,22, or 35. I haven't decided yet.

    I didn't know that the larger frame guns have larger/longer strikers. Is this true? I thought most models were dimensionally the same in the striker/trigger bar/connector/mag release/slide release locations. Except for ejectors and except for the wide bodies. That's what I thought anyway.

    Should I instead go with a standard striker spring for reliability and a heavy trigger spring to lighten the pull?
     
  5. VN350X10

    VN350X10

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    You might want to try using a set of "marine" spring cups, as they will reduce drag in the striker channel. Also as was posted earlier, check for drag in the striker channel itself. New inserts are about a buck each, & I try to keep a few on hand. When I'm working on a trigger job, part to part fit does come into play, as even "identical" parts aren't.


    uncle albert
     
  6. jcmios

    jcmios

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    What kind of lube are you using between the trigger bar, connector and tip if the striker and cruciform?
    Miltech grease, Mil Comm are great, so is Trigger Slick mixed with Slide Glide.

    After I stone my parts flat and remove the machine marks they go to two buffing wheels with white buffing compound and then finish with simchrome. Every part is mirror bright with no tool marks anywhere , the entire trigger bar, striker, connector and FP safety. On my G35 I drilled the spring hole higher up to get better leverage from the spring and I run a reduced power Wolff striker spring. I have also thinned shank of the connector and have cut the left side of the striker at a 45 degree angle much like Dale Rhea trigger system. Total trigger pull is 2 3/4.
     
  7. splashdown

    splashdown nra member

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    I'm using a lube called Gun Butter. It was created by a couple of local shooters who are Boeing Engineers. www.gunbutter.com

    I like Dale Rhea's tricks. It makes total sense reducing drag on everything. It is extreme, but that's how you get to the end result I guess. I'm thinking I should just contact Tom Novak.
     
  8. Glock-N-Fun

    Glock-N-Fun

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    Splash,

    The 4lb.springs can be 100% in some guns but not in others.I have had great results with taking two coils off a 5.5lb.wolff spring and sanding(smoothing)the outside surface of the spring with 400-600 grit paper than polishing.I have found that the spring in it's stock form accually drags more in the channel than the cups.There is .014+-play between the ID of the channel and the cups,which is plenty.
     
  9. WalterGA

    WalterGA Millennium Member

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    Now my curiousity is heightened. Exactly how did you determine that the "spring in it's stock form" drags more in the channel than the cups? Since the cups are wider than the spring, exactly what is the spring dragging on?

    This is befuddling. Please edify this ignorant proletarian.
     
  10. Glock-N-Fun

    Glock-N-Fun

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    WalterGA,

    Buy doing a simple test "grasshopper".I simply push a FP, spring and cups(assembled) through a channel sleeve(in hand) and determine what drags,why,and how to improve it.The spring is wider than the cups when installed on the FP as it is kinked grasshopper,if you look at a used factory FP spring it will show signs of the coating wear.(IP)you own no property?
     
  11. WalterGA

    WalterGA Millennium Member

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    Thanks for the info. I can't imagine being sensitive enough to tell the difference in drag of anything going on in a Glock's striker channel. But then, we grasshoppers don't have much room in our digestive system for b.s., either. :)
     
  12. RandySmith

    RandySmith

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    ... and there seems to be an abundance of it too.

    Randy
     
  13. Glock-N-Fun

    Glock-N-Fun

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    WalterGA,

    Sounds like you haven't done the test i described,possibly because you didn't have a channel sleeve on hand that isn't in a slide.As you well know anytime drag or friction is eliminated parts are able to move more freely and faster,in the case of a reduced power FP spring every little bit of reduced friction will help.No BS my man,do the testing yourself.
     
  14. WalterGA

    WalterGA Millennium Member

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    I was just "ribbin" ya a little. My needs will probably never be such that the difference in marine cups v. "regular" cups would mean anything to me.

    I'm truly impressed by the guys who claim that they can "feel" the difference in lock time between marine cups and "regular" cups. :)
     
  15. Glock-N-Fun

    Glock-N-Fun

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    WalterGA,

    Ah,gee,gosh golly,ya got me.

    I here ya about the watercups and the standard cups,after doing some research and testing i find no differance in friction between the two cups,the spring friction(rubbing) is the only case of friction i find on the ID of the sleeve.
     
  16. DAVEKO

    DAVEKO Deceased Millennium Member

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    "Would not stone the parts", use a dremel instead with polish. Take the slide parts out and check for oil or junk in the chanel liner. Oil or lube is the # one cause of a light primer strike. Have over 12,400 rounds with 38 different types of ammo through my G19 with a 4# Wolf reduced power striker spring - no light primer hits period. My main range ammo is Winchester White box 115 grain fmj value pack. Then agian as stated before there could be other "drag" causing the light strikes.

    If the light strikes are off center then the pistol may be firing out of battery. Even if done before, please recheck for oil "with a Q tip" inside the chanel liner and on the firing pin, and check for a burr on the striker. Polish it with a dremel while it's out.
    Also a recoil spring check, just to see if it is working properly - could also cause an out of battery problem.

    My G19 is working properly with no miss feeds, no jams, no light primer strikes, no worn or broken parts... with a Titanium Striker, Titanium Safety plunger, 4# reduced striker spring, non captured SS recoil guide rod and standard spring weight, 3.5# connector, and polished internals - it is 100% reliable in the past 12,400 rounds over a two year period. (The over travel stop and the 13# recoil spring are new with only 400+ rounds through them - no problems yet.)

    What is polished is the Striker, entire Trigger system, Barrel feed ramp including the barrel, and breech face.
     
  17. jcmios

    jcmios

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    Stoning is necessary to get the connector, striker, trigger bar and cruciform perfectly flat prior to polishing. I stone the radius on the trigger bar and then break any edges Three stone grades are used, first an India, then a Hard Arkansas and finally a Black Hard Arkansas. This is very similar to prepping metal prior to bluing; you want it to look like glass. On the striker the only area that I do not stone is the drop or FP safety cuts, I remove every machine mark prior to polishing. If you take your time you will have a much lighter and crisper trigger. Just polishing the parts is 1/3 of the job, and will not last with out re-polishing down the road. It is just like any professional trigger job, 2 to 3 hours and you have no high spots, no low spots, it is time and details that will make a big difference. This keeps customers coming back and word of mouth spreads fast when they ask "who did the work?".
     
  18. DAVEKO

    DAVEKO Deceased Millennium Member

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    jcmios, nice info. I will take a spare trigger and do that 45 degree anlge and the stone process your talking about, and then polish it. The only question I have, do you go through the second layer (off color). I found on most of mine that there is a shinny layer, off color, then it shines up again. Thanks...........dave..........

    I've stoned the trigger parts in the past with no good results, I've been doing it wrong........
     
  19. jcmios

    jcmios

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    On some of the strikers I well get a 2 tone look; I think the plating is just thinner on some. I have never had to remove that much metal as to get to bare steel on the striker tang as it is a pretty flat surface as is. Once it is flat you should be to your Black Hard Arkansas stone which is more of a polishing stone then a cutting stone.
    The polishing is done on two different 8" sewn muslin wheels, the first with white cake compound and the second with simchrome. Polish the entire trigger bar, striker, connector and FP safety, especially the underside of the trigger bar as this is a contact point and will cause drag.

    When cutting the 45 degree angle of the striker, go slow and use an armorer’s orange half cover plate so you can see how much engagement you have. All you are trying to do is remove unnecessary bearing surface, It is easy to remove too much, and then you will get the pistol to fire when the trigger resets when you cycle it by hand. if you were to load the pistol it would be full auto. So go slow and take a little at a time. When you are done dress the flat and edges of the striker and re polish the area.
    Good luck and take your time.
     
  20. DAVEKO

    DAVEKO Deceased Millennium Member

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    jcmios, many many thanks on the details...........dave......;f