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On my glock 19 I can put them all the bullets in the silouette head at about 10 yds, at 20 they are grouping good but to the left of the head. Am I doing something wrong or do my sights need to be adjusted?
 

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You might be pushing or pulling the trigger, but it's just as likely that the sights are off. Use the location of the center of the group to determine how far off yours are.

My G17 was shooting about 3" to the left, at 10 yards. A quick adjustment (with the proper tool) and its good to go.
 

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There is a learning curve associated with the Glock trigger and lightweight frame. Your sights are just fine. Try shooting left handed and your shots will go right.
 

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There is a learning curve associated with the Glock trigger and lightweight frame. Your sights are just fine. Try shooting left handed and your shots will go right.
Coach strikes again!:wavey:
 

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While "stuff happens," in my experience and observation Glock sights are almost invariably well set at the factory/Smyrna for center hold point of aim/point of impact at 25 yards (and less!).

Heed well the postings by Chase7 and DannyR is my suggestion. Try bench testing your Glock-or have someone who is a known good shot try your Glock...

Best, Jon
 

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While "stuff happens," in my experience and observation Glock sights are almost invariably well set at the factory/Smyrna for center hold point of aim/point of impact at 25 yards (and less!).

Heed well the postings by Chase7 and DannyR is my suggestion. Try bench testing your Glock-or have someone who is a known good shot try your Glock...

Best, Jon
I don't disagree for a minute with the above. However, I did notice on my G-19 that I was aiming differently than I was on my 21sf. (Compensating just a titch.) I had a shop take a look at the rear sight and they comfirmed that it was off...just a titch. Made the adjustment and now both are dialed in with no difference in aiming.

Make sure it's not you before you try anything...but sometimes it just might be the pistol. :cool:
 

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I might be flamed for saying this but keep in mind that just because a rear sight is dead nuts center of the dovetail that it is "right".

I currently have 4 Glocks ... and have had many, many more ... and it is not uncommon for one or two of them to require the rear sight to be slightly off center one way or the other to shoot POA.
 

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Volgrad, that's been my experience too. Out of my 4 Glocks, 3 had the sights beautifully centered, and shot POA/POI. 1 had the rear sight slightly assymetric in the dovetail from the factory-which I found initially disconcerting, but the gun shoots POA/POI as well.

Obviously, there can be slight variations from gun to gun (or sight to sight). The crucial thing is that we as shooters insure that our guns shoot POA/POI-or, as StudParker found, some adjustments may need to be made.

However, in my experience, the advice offered by DannyR and the diagnostic chart provided by Chase7 are the most likely to be applicable-generally, usually, most of the time...

Best, Jon
 

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are you referring to the glock tool thats 150$?
You do not need that glock tool.

Get a flat-end brass punch and a small hammer. Tap the rear sight over to adjust for windage.

Most shooters who have just been introduced to Glock pistols for the first time tend to shoot high. Once they become comfortable with the grip angle, they are usually good to go.

If you are consistently shooting either high or low, you may have to ajdust from a 6 O'clock hold to a center hold. Play around and figure out what works best for you, but paying $150 for a tool to adjust the rear sight is a BIG waste of money.
 

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There is a learning curve associated with the Glock trigger and lightweight frame. Your sights are just fine. Try shooting left handed and your shots will go right.
How can you make the assumption that his sights are "just fine" without having shot the gun yourself?

I have had to adjust the rear sight on darn near every handgun I own...even those that were "centered" on the slide.

This frequently happens with people who are dominant with one hand and the opposite eye. Sometimes getting a person like that to keep both eyes open when shooting is all that is required, but more often than not the rear sight has to be drifted.
 

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There is a learning curve associated with the Glock trigger and lightweight frame. Your sights are just fine. Try shooting left handed and your shots will go right.
I agree. I've been a Glock shooter, instructor, etc. since the late 80's and I've seen a lot of Glocks. Not one of them ever needed a sight adjustment straight from the box, but many of the shooters need adjustment.
 

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How can you make the assumption that his sights are "just fine" without having shot the gun yourself?

I have had to adjust the rear sight on darn near every handgun I own...even those that were "centered" on the slide.
Like DannyR, many years of handgun experience tells me that you should have corrected your grip and trigger control, rather than compensating for it with the sights. It is very, very common for shooters to have issues with guns that are, mechanically, perfectly zeroed. It is pretty rare for a modern fixed sight gun to actually need sight adjustment when new. Unfortunately, we make the mistake in the military of usually taking the shortcut of adjusting the rifle/pistol to the shooter, rather than teaching the shooter better technique.
 

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Like DannyR, many years of handgun experience tells me that you should have corrected your grip and trigger control, rather than compensating for it with the sights. It is very, very common for shooters to have issues with guns that are, mechanically, perfectly zeroed. It is pretty rare for a modern fixed sight gun to actually need sight adjustment when new. Unfortunately, we make the mistake in the military of usually taking the shortcut of adjusting the rifle/pistol to the shooter, rather than teaching the shooter better technique.
I ASSUMED that the OP was a shooter and this was his first Glock.

I have still had to adjust nearly every rear sight on every handgun that I own, and I have been shooting for many years, and CCW for 22.

Still, tough to diagnose a problem unless you personally see it.
 

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All three of mine have the rear site just a tad to the right. Two of the three have aftermarket barrels in them. They have been bench checked and all came from the factory dead center. I am at least consistent in how I hold and shoot them (21, 26, 35). The 21 has Ghost Ring, the 26 has Meprolight Tritium, and the 35 has XS Tritium small dot.
 
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