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President Reagan, Vice President HW Bush, both of their wives, most of the White House staff, many senators and congressman. Ollie North, Silvester Stallone, Sting, I'm sure there is more but that's all I can think of off the top of my head at the moment.
 

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Former POTUS Bill Clinton, The Laker Girls, The Temptations, Hootie and the Blowfish, and Paul Overstreet. Mr. Clinton told us we were doing a great thing and the rest were doing USO tours in the late 90's.
 

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When I was at Fort Lewis I did some time in the 9th ID Chief of Staff's office. One of the Assistant Division Commanders I worked for was then Brig Gen Bill Carpenter of West Point football fame. He later distinguished himself by calling in fire on his own position to save his company in Vietnam. I remember him as a pretty modest, easy-going guy, but when he had something to say you most definitely paid attention.

 

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Ummmm... Nope, not a soul.


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Nobody anyone ever heard of. But I was working on a project when I was a Captain at 15 AF. I had to go into a Three Star Generals office one on one, and brief him on the project. The briefing went well.

My wife did get to shake JFK's hand once, and she met Clint Eastwood one time.
 

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Gen Omar Bradley at Ft. Bliss TX in 1981, just before he died, Jerry Lewis the comedian during an 82nd Abn excersize he was observing, and bob Hope at the Chicago O'hare Airport in 1980 something and I thanked him for his service to the troops all those years.
Oh yea, and the Dallas Cowboy Cheerleaders traveling team at camp Casey Korea while serving with the second Military Police Company 2md Infantry Division summer of 82.
 

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2Lt Ray Odierno. Served in the same Batallion together.

He later became Army Chief of Staff.
 

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Yes. Johnathan Winters ;) Ann Margaret and Bob Hope.

I guess my priorities are a bit different.

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michael
 
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Part of the movie Courage Under Fire staring Denzel Washington and Meg Ryan were filmed at Ft Irwin when I was stationed there. They kept the wrecked helicopter in our motor pool in between shoots. I did get to meet Denzel Washington when he came to the motor pool.

I missed the Bob Hope show in Saudi During Desert Shield, I was on guard duty during the show. I could still hear it though.
 

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Lieutenant General Ricardo Sanchez who was over all the forces in Iraq early in OIF and who lost his job over the Abu Ghraib situation, was my Battalion Commander in Desert Storm.

I also met Barry McCafferty who was the 24th ID Commanding General during Desert Storm and Shield and later became Bill Clinton's "drug czar" IIRC.

I met Arnold Schwarzenegger in 2003 at Camp Arifjan when he was coming through promoting one of his Terminator movies.
 

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I spent a day flying David Rockefeller around the Costa Rican jungle. I was still a kid, all I knew about him was he was filthy rich and one of his nurses was pretty hot.
 

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Lieutenant General Ricardo Sanchez who was over all the forces in Iraq early in OIF and who lost his job over the Abu Ghraib situation, was my Battalion Commander in Desert Storm.
BG Geoff Miller (also Abu Ghraib) was the ADCM of 4th ID when I was stationed at Evans Army Community Hospital.

He came into my office one morning and I didn't get on my feet fast enough to suit him.

He chewed my ass over it. I was 90 days short and found it quite boring
 

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When I was a Troop Commander with the 3d ACR during Desert Shield we were doing some training out in Saudi Desert and this Blackhawk kept circling my location and eventually landed very close to us. Couple of personal security guys jumped off and then Gen. Schwarzkopf. I introduced myself to him and he asked me what we were doing. Asked me to circle the wagons and bring the troops in. Gave everyone a rip roaring speech. Got back in and flew away. Of course when the Squadron Commander and everyone up the food chain heard he was on the ground with me they all got in the Hummers and probably broke some land speed records trying to get there...but he was long gone by the time they got there and I then spent about an hour being interrogated about what he said and what I said...lol

I had drinks and cigars at a dining in with Gordon Sullivan who was a Brigadier and the Armor School commandant at the time. Became Chief of Staff of the Army... Really nice guy.

I served under Eric Shinseki when he was the Cavalry Squadron Commander for the 3d Infantry Division in Schweinfurt Germany back in the 80's He was a Vietnam war vet and a member of the Blackhorse Mafia....missing a leg! Helluva golfer. Later became Chief of Staff of the Army. Very competent and charismatic leader.

I got to meet James Polk (4 star who became commander of US Army Europe in the 60's and 70'). He commanded the 3d Cavalry Regiment during WW II which was assigned to Patton's 3d Army. (Patton himself commanded the 3d Cavalry back in the day). General Polk was retired when I knew him but he gave the Officer's of the Regiment a farewell speech as we headed to the Gulf War that told us what to expect and how to prepare ourselves for combat. Best speech I ever had in the Army from a senior officer and also very sobering open and honest point of view from someone who'd been there and done it. Not a rah rah speech in the least.

I headed a military and civilian training team in the late 80's in Pakistan. Got to meet and have lunch with President Zia and he presented me with a big hand engraved platter. Zia had been an Army General and tanker and was trained at the US Army Armor school at Ft. Knox. That tour sucked. Zia, my boss (a Brigadier named Wassom) and the US Ambassador all died in a plane crash 20 minutes after we did a presentation for the Pakistani General Staff at a remote site out in the Cholistan desert. Unpleasant business recovering bodies from the crash site...not much left. Biggest body part we found was a torso and the biggest part of the C130 we found was an engine. Very sad.
 

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I had the honor of meeting Omar Bradley twice in the year he died. I worked in the Ft. Bliss commanding general's conference room at the time. General Bradley would address the young lieutenants attending an officers course. His aide would bring him into the conference room in his wheel chair and pin a microphone to his lapel while the attendees stood at attention. Once his lap blanket was adjusted he would say, "at ease. Please take your seats." It was so quiet in the room that you couldn't hear anyone sit down. These young lieutenants were awestruck by the history before them. As a young Spec 4 I was too. I had to closely monitor the sound system. General Bradley's voice was hard to pick up even with the lavalier microphone. He always told two stories aimed at helping the officers understand their role as leaders. I can't remember the second story, but the first story always got a laugh, the only time I'd hear anything from the officers.
General Bradley related that when he was a young captain he decided to take a vehicle by himself and drive to a nearby town. (my memory isn't helping me right now. He was a captain in WWI, but my memory says that this story took place in WWII. Regardless, the events are as I remember his telling of the story.)
He had driven across an open field toward a sentry post. The sentry stopped him and challenged him. Captain Bradley identified himself and the sentry responded that the captain wasn't supposed to be driving across that field. Bradley replied that he was a captain and would drive where ever he wanted. He said he gained added respect for enlisted soldiers when the sentry replied "the mines in the minefield you just crossed don't care if you're a captain or not Sir."
He would then tell the young officers that he wanted them to understand that although they were leaders and were responsible for their men they should never take them for granted. "Listen to your men and then make your decision for the best course of action."
General Bradley would frequently fall asleep for a few minutes during these encounters. His aide would quietly stand to his side and slightly behind him waiting for him to awaken. Not one person in the room would make a sound. And then the General would wake up and continue where he left off.
I had the honor of meeting his wife when I accompanied officers from the Ft. Bliss command group to his house below the William Beaumont Army Medical Center. Hell, I can't even remember why we went there.
It was a sad day when he passed away.
I also had the honor of having Thanksgiving dinner with General John Wickham Jr. while I was stationed in Korea in 1979. I was the Soldier of the Quarter for the 38th Brigade and because of that I received the invitation. I was very happy to see that there were about fifteen to twenty other soldiers there also. Wickham explained that his wife was stateside for the holiday and he thought it would be nice to have some company. LOL
In any event, it was a most awkward gathering for me. I can count at least three separate incidents in which I completely embarrassed myself in front of the general. In addition, my first sergeant thought I had completely lost my mind when I asked if I could decline the invitation. "YOU DON"T ****IN' DECLINE AN INVITATION TO THANKSGIVING DINNER FROM THE TOP OFFICER IN KOREA BOY!!!!"
I'm very thankful that I had taken a leak before I stepped into Tops office that day.
 
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