Dehumidifiers

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by RustyL, Jul 22, 2018.

  1. RustyL

    RustyL

    Messages:
    4,670
    Likes Received:
    6,427
    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2012
    Location:
    Arkansas
    Anybody have one? My thermostat monitors the humidity in our home and it is rarely below 60. Being that we had new heating and cooling installed I wondered if we lowered the humidity if it would help on comfort, though it has been hot as heck here. Where to place a dehumidifier is questionable. I wondered if placing one in the kitchen and dining area would be ideal being the laundry room is in close proximity.
    Then there’s health reasons to have one. My wife and I don’t suffer much from allergies and colds. However last winter we both had a rather long bouts with chest colds.

    Anyone that has one did it improve the comfort of your home and health?
     
  2. catman71

    catman71 Spewer of TROOF

    Messages:
    9,160
    Likes Received:
    24,790
    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2007
    Location:
    Central MN
    I use one in my basement

    Dry air feels way better, seems cooler in the summer.

    I especially use it in the fall or spring when we get damp weather but it's not hot enough to run the AC.
     
    LEO/Dad and TBO like this.

  3. pittpa

    pittpa What did I come in here for?

    Messages:
    10,697
    Likes Received:
    22,378
    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2010
    Location:
    Fortress of Solitude on 11th floor - SW PA 'burbs
    The seem kind of noisy to use in a living space. I had a console a/c unit from Sam's that had a dehumidifier setting that I never used. In A/C mode it was tolerable at to noise. Do they have whole house units that can be attached to ductwork like a humidifier, using the furnace fan?
     
  4. catman71

    catman71 Spewer of TROOF

    Messages:
    9,160
    Likes Received:
    24,790
    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2007
    Location:
    Central MN
    Save yourself some work and hook up a hose and run it in your floor drain. Then you never have to empty it.

    I have troubles with it freezing up because my basement is pretty cool. I think it's just my unit, it's old and I've seen other ones work better than mine.
     
    TBO and Grumpy_old_man like this.
  5. RustyL

    RustyL

    Messages:
    4,670
    Likes Received:
    6,427
    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2012
    Location:
    Arkansas
    I wondered about the noise as well. I probably need to research the whole house type.
     
  6. RustyL

    RustyL

    Messages:
    4,670
    Likes Received:
    6,427
    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2012
    Location:
    Arkansas
    How long does it take for yours to fill?
     
  7. Dave514

    Dave514

    Messages:
    42,399
    Likes Received:
    44,158
    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2013
    Location:
    USSA
    Dehumidifiers increase the rate of colds. Cilia moving out mucus benefits from humidity. You may like a dehumidifier in the summer but not in the winter. Plus, more humid air feels warmer in the winter where having it dryer feels cooler in the summer.

    They are too noisy for most living spaces unless you just run it at night. Emptying them becomes a pain (every damn day) so, if you can, having them near a drain where you can just run a small hose and set the humidity level you want and let it go seems best to me.
     
    catman71 likes this.
  8. catman71

    catman71 Spewer of TROOF

    Messages:
    9,160
    Likes Received:
    24,790
    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2007
    Location:
    Central MN
    16 hours or so if it is really humid.
     
    TBO likes this.
  9. RustyL

    RustyL

    Messages:
    4,670
    Likes Received:
    6,427
    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2012
    Location:
    Arkansas
    So that place would be the laundry room. I could run a hose to the drain on the washing machine.
    Yeah I also knew it’s better to have a bit of humidity in the winter months, don’t want to dry out.
     
  10. 686Owner

    686Owner NRA Life Member

    Messages:
    14,338
    Likes Received:
    3,394
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2007
    Location:
    KY
    I have one I run in the basement. Hose to drain in floor. No way would I use it in the winter.
     
  11. Dave514

    Dave514

    Messages:
    42,399
    Likes Received:
    44,158
    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2013
    Location:
    USSA
    The ones I see, like mine, are drained by gravity.
    Here is an example from the interwebs.
    [​IMG]

    I don't think I've see any with a pump to run water up to a drain.
     
  12. G19Cfan

    G19Cfan

    Messages:
    2,377
    Likes Received:
    5,124
    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2017
    You already have a debumidifier - its called an air conditioner. If you want to reduce the humidity in the air, set it for a lower tempurature.
     
    Victor Dubya, redrick and JohnBT like this.
  13. Grumpy_old_man

    Grumpy_old_man

    Messages:
    3,194
    Likes Received:
    7,950
    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2011
    Dehumidifiers? Yep, I have 'em.

    Three 70 pint units in the basement go 24-7 during most of the year here, fill up about every 10-12 hours. Am adding in smaller peltier effect units in side rooms and bathrooms to help out. Recently did a test where I shut 'em all down and the humidity level was over 60% within a few hours, over 80% in a day. So yeah, I need dehumidifiers here.

    On the plus side, good compressor type dehumidifiers really do knock the humidity below 45%, and they help the AC work better. On the minus side, they're expensive and noisy. They also shed a good deal of waste heat, so while your AC works "better" you do need to run it more. Right now I am looking into switching to a large whole house commercial unit coupled to the HVAC, then use the small peltier units in each of the more humid rooms to help out.

    Watch out for recalls on older units (there's still a huge 2016 recall). If you don't like changing buckets, you can set a good compressor type dehumidifier to drain directly into a drain or sump. Some of the more expensive units have a pump built in that will move the water up out of a basement. Have never used one of those, can't comment.

    Grumpy
    PS The peltier units don't pull anything like the water out of the air that compressor units do. A few ounces a day is good enough for inside a cabinet or helping clean up the humidity after a shower, but they're not in the same league as even the smallest compressor unit.
     
    catman71 likes this.
  14. kiole

    kiole

    Messages:
    11,389
    Likes Received:
    11,419
    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2008
    A condensate pump is what you need to drain up. You can buy it separately or with it built in.
     
  15. tom mac

    tom mac

    Messages:
    1,307
    Likes Received:
    1,194
    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2014
    Location:
    NY
    I have a 7 yr old DeLonghi with a built in pump, suppose to go up 8ft.
    Never used it tho, as I drilled a hole thru my basement floor ( 4 inches ) and stuffed the drain hose there... no empty bucket issue
     
  16. G17Jake

    G17Jake

    Messages:
    8,183
    Likes Received:
    5,866
    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2002
    I run a dehumidifier in my basement. While I'm in the basement I turn it off. When the central AC is on, the dehumidifier runs much less. During winter the dehumidifier isn't needed.
     
    LEO/Dad likes this.
  17. jilverthor

    jilverthor

    Messages:
    1,524
    Likes Received:
    630
    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2004
    Location:
    Parker, CO
    A humidifier, yes we have one of those attached to the furnace it keeps ... wait, you said a dehumidifier. Don't have one of those though my folks do and it makes a difference. If you go the whole house route, make sure the HVAC is sized properly. When they got a newer, more efficient A/C that was the same size (in terms of cooling capacity) as the old one, it ran much less and no longer pulled the same amount of moisture out of the air. The end result was the house felt muggy and unpleasant until they figured out how to get things adjusted. It still isn't as good as it once was, but it certainly got better. The dehumidifiers are in the unfinished basement and run most of the year.
     
  18. RustyL

    RustyL

    Messages:
    4,670
    Likes Received:
    6,427
    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2012
    Location:
    Arkansas
    Ahhhh yeah you’re right, the laundry room is not an option for drainage. The unit I’ve been looking at has an auto shutoff when water gets to full.
     
  19. RustyL

    RustyL

    Messages:
    4,670
    Likes Received:
    6,427
    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2012
    Location:
    Arkansas
    Well the temperature is set on 70 now, I can’t , well I don’t want to, keep turning the temperature lower. It’s been hot and high humidity here in my part of the state for a while. I’m probably overthinking my issue, dunno
     
  20. Dave514

    Dave514

    Messages:
    42,399
    Likes Received:
    44,158
    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2013
    Location:
    USSA
    Maybe what kiole is talking about would work.