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Definition of "good condition"

Discussion in 'General Firearms Forum' started by Foxtrotx1, May 19, 2012.

  1. Foxtrotx1

    Foxtrotx1

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  2. Bob Hafler

    Bob Hafler

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  3. bac1023

    bac1023

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    :ack:

    I wouldn't pay $50 for that.
     
  4. 4 glocks

    4 glocks

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    It says " Just good condition"= POS
     
  5. 40 0'Glock

    40 0'Glock CZ / Colt fanboy

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    CAI really imports some full-fledged beaters.
     
  6. Bruce M

    Bruce M

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    Remember that to the seller of a gun it is a "minor blemish in the finish" and to the buyer it is "rust that appears to have weakened the frame." In this ad maybe "good" means the functionality of the gun, not the finish.
     
  7. AZ Jeff

    AZ Jeff

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    NRA MODERN GUN CONDITION STANDARDS:

    NEW: Not previously sold at retail, in same condition as current factory production.

    PERFECT: In New condition in every respect. (Jim's note - in my experience, many collectors & dealers use "As New" to describe this condition).

    EXCELLENT: New condition, used but little, no noticeable marring of wood or metal, bluing perfect, (except at muzzle or sharp edges).

    VERY GOOD: In perfect working condition, no appreciable wear on working surfaces, no corrosion or pitting, only minor surface dents or scratches.

    GOOD: In safe working condition, minor wear on working surfaces, no broken parts, no corrosion or pitting that will interfere with proper functioning.

    FAIR: In safe working condition but well worn, perhaps requiring replacement of minor parts or adjustments which should be indicated in advertisement, no rust, but may have corrosion pits which do not render article unsafe or inoperable.
     
  8. kahrcarrier

    kahrcarrier FAHRENHEIT

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    Pretty rough.

    If it was a Smith, I would have it refinished after purchase. Of course, if it was a Smith, I doubt I could get it for $169.00. :dunno:
     
  9. Bob Hafler

    Bob Hafler

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  10. Foxtrotx1

    Foxtrotx1

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    Man, Good and Fair are generous words there.
     
  11. Decguns

    Decguns

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    Welcome to the used & surplus gun world! Takes a while for most Noobs to understand the NRA Condition Standards. In your mind, "Good" condition is likely equivalent to NRA "Excellent" condition. In the real world, "Good" condition essentially means the gun will work. Scratched, pitted, counter-bored, rusty, worn... but in working order.

    Companies like Century Arms label their products per the NRA criteria... "Good" is usually pretty ugly. But it meets the standards. Other importers often cut the consumer a break, and to perserve their good reputation, grade guns one under... "Very Good" labeled as "Good" for instance.