Deer hunters come in

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by SmiTTy50AE, Nov 28, 2005.

  1. SmiTTy50AE

    SmiTTy50AE SSgt of Marines

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    So I'm finally out of the service and want to get my hunting license.I'm no stranger to guns but have never hunted before.I'm interested mostly in hunting deer.Any suggestions on what caliber/model rifle I should go with and why...?

    Thanks,
    -Rich
     
  2. noway

    noway

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    {Any suggestions on what caliber/model rifle I should go with and why...?}

    that's a loaded question. You have to 1st ask what can you shoot , have shot and do or not own?

    Simple answer would be anything they 243win or bigger and something that you can shoot accurate. For deer anything 2 4 3 caliber would be the minimal and get the job done good. So get the biggest caliber that you fill comfortable for the distance you think you will be engaging deer and start at that.
     

  3. SmiTTy50AE

    SmiTTy50AE SSgt of Marines

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    I haven't shot that many rifles.I've shot a 30-30 lever action,didn't like the lever feature but not too bad.And I shot my friends Remington 700.I really liked that....A lot.
     
  4. Chuck TX

    Chuck TX CLM

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    Can't go too wrong in most situations with a .308 or .30-06, but it all depends on the environment you'll be hunting. I have bolts in 7mmRemMag and 300WinMag, but they pretty much stay in the safe. I got them because I wanted the super duper ultra cal when I first started purchasing hunting rifles. Problem with them is up close they're too much for the job. Most of my hunting is 25-150yrd range. So the .308 is my most used hunting rifle. Plus good hunting ammo is less, and you can get cheap practice ammo for a decent deal.
     
  5. iiibbb

    iiibbb

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    What you get depends on where you are... what type of hunting you will be doing. In a stand? Still hunting? On the ground? At an agricultrual field? In the woods? How far do you have to walk to get to your stand?
     
  6. punkture

    punkture

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    I have a Marlin 336 30/30 lever action and a Tikka T3 Lite 7mm Rem Mag bolt action and love them both. They are both great deer guns, BUT they serve their own individual purposes. Keep your terrain and potential distances in mind when deciding on caliber. Once you've settled on caliber (like noway said, .243 or greater will do you just fine), try your best to shoot or at least handle as many of your friends' guns as possible. I was able to shoot the browning (both the synthetic and wooden stock models), remington (synthetic stock), savage, ruger, etc before going for the Tikka. I based my decision on price, availability, my personal accuracy, and most importantly, for me, weight. The next time I have money just burning a hole in my pocket, I'll most likely go for a Weatherby Vanguard in .270, .308, or 30-06. I learned something in my search for a good deer rifle - Walmart can get for more guns than they stock, and their prices are usually right. If you are going for a long distance gun, keep in mind that your glass will cost as much if not more than your gun. A few links that may help:
    http://www.chuckhawks.com/wby_vanguard_syn.htm
    http://www.chuckhawks.com/rugged_vs_refined.htm
    http://www.ozarkguns.com/htm/rifles.htm (to give you an idea of price comparison, although i got a better deal on my tikka at walmart)

    oh and good luck! its a hard decision with as many great candidates out there. we've all been there.
     
  7. ILikeFtLbs

    ILikeFtLbs

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  8. BillRiley

    BillRiley

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    Before you buy a rifle, you may want to check if hunting with a rifle (vs. shotgun or muzzleloader) is legal. It looks like CT has restrictions if that is where you will be hunting.
     
  9. SmiTTy50AE

    SmiTTy50AE SSgt of Marines

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    I looked it up in the Hunting and Trapping guide.

    It says:
    12,16 or 20 gauge breech loaded shotgun with soft alloy projectile.Shotgun must not be capable of holding more than 3 rounds.Centerfire rifle 6mm or larger may be used if landholding is 10 or more acres and the landowner has authorized rifle use on the consent form.
     
  10. BillRiley

    BillRiley

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    From what I looked up for CT, it looked like rifle was only allowed on private lands. Do you know, yet, where you will be hunting? Open field, heavy brush, or both? How long of shots? 0-100 yards? 100-300 yards? Do you want a short action (.308, .243, 7mm-08)or long action rifle (.270 Win, 30-06, 25-06)? Do you want plain jane caliber (30-06) or something unique (and more expensive to buy ammo for)? Can you handle heavy recoil? How much do you plan to shoot the rifle?
     
  11. rfb45colt

    rfb45colt safe-cracker

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    What type of firearm you use depends on the terrain you'll be hunting on. If hunting in heavy cover without the possibility of long shots over open ground (such as agricultural fields) the best choice is a shorter barreled rifle in a medium caliber that has the ability to be brought up on your target and fired quickly. The best choice for sights would be a peep-sight or low powered scope (like a 2-3X or so). Good choices for this would be the Marlin levers, or a semi-auto or pump in a carbine version.

    For more open territory, a bolt-action in something like .270, .280, or .30-06 with a varible powered scope is best.

    If hunting in shotgun-only areas, your best bet would be something like a Remington 870 12ga, with a fully rifled barrel, and a 2X scope.

    I've been hunting deer in the big woods of northern WI for 40+ years. This is a rifle area. For many many years, my choice of rifle was a Marlin 336 in .35-Rem caliber, with a Williams peep sight. Dozens of deer have succumbed to it. Having a scope only (which I tried) was a detriment. There always seems to be snowy, crappy, weather... and keeping the snow off the scope lens is a pain in the rear. I'm a big fan of the peep-sights. The peep-sight is fool-proof. In the area I hunt, I found that if I can see the deer, it's almost always well within range of the peep. But scopes have another advantage, and that is light gathering ability in the low-light periods of the day... which is when there is the most deer activity. During the 1st and last 20 minutes of the day, open sights are "iffy". If I was a "if it's brown, it's down" type of hunter, then the open sights would suffice. But I now hunt mostly for "trophy" deer, and I need to see if it's got a "rack" before I drop the hammer. That's when a scope is nice to have.

    After 30 years of searching for the "perfect" deer rifle, I think I've finally found mine. :) I came across a used Remington 742 Carbine (in .308) for a real good price. I replaced the wood with a Ram-Line synthetic stock set. I added a Williams peep-sight rear & "Fire-Sight" front. I put on see-thru rings, and above the peep I have a very compact 6X scope (Leapers Golden Image 5th Gen - actually designed and marketed for an AR-15... I have the same scope on my Armalite's carry handle). Getting the proper eye relief took some gunsmithing, but I now have what is my "perfect" deer rifle. It's light, it's short and easy to carry, it's quick on target with the peep, and if a "long" shot (over 100 yds) arises, or a deer is sneaking through cover at first or last light of the day, the 6X scope is available.