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For a while now, I've been feeling this small vibration when driving...almost like warped front rotors, but when I hit the brake it didn't get shudder or get worse, so I ruled that out. Had all the tires balanced twice, about two months ago...still didn't go away...got an alignment done...vibration still there...driving slowly at 5 mph I could feel some very slight side-to-side motion...it was trying to tell me something but I just couldn't nail it down...

Got back from a two day trip to Laughlin, NV, came back through Oatman, middle of nowhere...the vibration was strongest around 65 but when I kicked it up to 75-80 going across Hwy 40 it would go away...well I get home and happened to notice THIS on the right rear tire, it's just at one spot, weird, doesn't go all the way around, popping up in the tread channel and peeling apart (Michelin, by the way) -

P1100043.JPG P1100044.JPG

Off to Discount Tire...got some credit back on it, they said it was on the verge of a blowout...two new rear tires and all is well again. Don't know what caused it or even what it really was, but a good reminder to check tires more often. 75-80 mph on this, in the middle of the desert. Whew. Stay safe.
 

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I do a walk around inspection every time I fuel my truck.
Good habit, and I usually take a look as well, but I'm thinking this may have been positioned at the bottom of the tire the last few times and I never saw it. The damage may have become visible only recently, I'm surprised it wasn't noticed during the previous tire balancing or alignment.
 

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Was this blistering caused by under inflation/alignment?
 

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Was this blistering caused by under inflation/alignment?
No, I'm religious about keeping them inflated to 36 psi (OEM) and it was only happening at that spot on only that tire...so it wasn't alignment...probably something in the tire broke (belt, I don't know)
 

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It used to be pretty common in the phoenix heat for tires to develop a large bubble like that. I had it happen several times. It would make a thump-thump-thump sound while driving. I haven't had it happen in years. Maybe the rubber materials have gotten better.
 

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One nice thing about radials, they will usually give a warning before failure; if you pay attention and look for it.

I was driving a crooked county road in my Mustang and straightening out the curves, like I usually do. I just felt something funny in the way the car handled, so I pulled off at a safe spot and took a close look. One tire had a little piece of steel cord sticking out. The tire still had almost half tread left on it. I put the spare on and continued.

I always throw away the last five thousand or more miles of tires, and watch new tires during the first thousand miles real close. Those are generally the areas where you'll have the most problems. And of course I'm a nut about keeping proper inflation pressures.
 

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For the non automotively or technically inclined, what are some things we should be looking for in a tire inspection?
 

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For the non automotively or technically inclined, what are some things we should be looking for in a tire inspection?
Excessive wear on the tread in one area - in the center if the tire is overinflated, on the edges if the tire is underinflated, one edge if tire is out of alignment or suspension damage (worst case); bulges on the sidewall; bulges in the tread; wires sticking out of the tread; make sure to check your valve-stems to make sure it is in place and not pinched.

I am sure I am missing some, too.
 

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Ba-nan-nah-nuh
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For a while now, I've been feeling this small vibration when driving...almost like warped front rotors, but when I hit the brake it didn't get shudder or get worse, so I ruled that out. Had all the tires balanced twice, about two months ago...still didn't go away...got an alignment done...vibration still there...driving slowly at 5 mph I could feel some very slight side-to-side motion...it was trying to tell me something but I just couldn't nail it down...

Got back from a two day trip to Laughlin, NV, came back through Oatman, middle of nowhere...the vibration was strongest around 65 but when I kicked it up to 75-80 going across Hwy 40 it would go away...well I get home and happened to notice THIS on the right rear tire, it's just at one spot, weird, doesn't go all the way around, popping up in the tread channel and peeling apart (Michelin, by the way) -

View attachment 853934 View attachment 853936

Off to Discount Tire...got some credit back on it, they said it was on the verge of a blowout...two new rear tires and all is well again. Don't know what caused it or even what it really was, but a good reminder to check tires more often. 75-80 mph on this, in the middle of the desert. Whew. Stay safe.
I was a Remington/Firestone/Goodyear/etc., tire dealer for years - I also trouble-shot for Triple-A on their vehicular fatalities, etc., and I can say that Michelins were responsible for more one-car accidents than any other radial tire. Period.

There's so much information to impart to you youngsters, but I will answer questions as they come to bear - and if something's not clear to you, let me know.

I left a lot of words out of the post here - and a lot of them have only 4 letters or less.... so they shouldn't be a problem ... but they made my answer a little l-o-n-g.....

.... however ... I'll be here all week .....

Before this becomes TL-DR, I will ask if anyone has ever heard a vehicle going by with a LOT of tire noise? Do you know why SOME tires make so much noise - a rolling-rump-rump-rump type sound?

The biggest problems are:
A] tire rotation ... then
B] road damage ... and maybe
C] Bad tire technology/construction.
D] Wrong tires on vehicle - 40-inch MUD-N-SNOW PADDLEWHEEL tires on a K5 Blazer being driven on the freeway comes to mind.​

Most tires don't like to be moved into a different position on a vehicle and have their job description changed from "power-acceleration/following" to "steering/braking/leading".

Even though I do not use Michelin tires for any of my vehicles, I still, never rotate any of my tires. I get excellent, even wear and reliability from tires that are watched closely and at the first sign of a possible bad wear pattern --- I REPAIR THE PROBLEM, and I don't rotate a tire to make it wear evenly in a different position.
►Once an oddball pattern is developed on a tire, it will continue building the bad pattern and may also pick up a new, secondary-bad pattern in a different position on your car.
►Once a tire is pattern ruined, it is by definition of the very word: ruined ... and moving it to a different position - no matter how well-thought out, etc, can cause carcass separations like you got.​

Once a tire carcass separates, it is a hand grenade with a pulled pin.

Why do tires fail inside the carcass?
1. Striking a very hard object on the highway, breaking cords and corruption of its airtight integrity
2. Running at low air pressure or badly overloaded and run for a period of time.
3. Rotation to a new position causes cords to change position, cutting into each other and weakening the bond to the rubber and losing airtight integrity - causing a bubble and a potential blowout.​

Most modern tires can endure a Front-to-Rear rotation, but 5-point cross rotation is rife with problems.

It's a CORD-thing.

The cords are set into rubber to keep them in both a static and dynamic position and they are happy to perform that duty - and they have to play well with the other cords alongside ... and those crossing them ... (remember - these cords are in RADIAL tires and that's how the cords run - radially - or from the rim/bead on one side, to the rim/bead on the other side.)

Once a tire is rotated, the cords are subjected to different duties and they cut into other cords where they cross and run alongside. After all, the tire will have a few miles on it and the rubber is a living organism and it conforms to the cords as they are when they were new.

But rotation creates physical problems to the cords as they have to play a whole different game with rubbing the cords in a different way and cutting across the others.

This weakens the cords though for a while they may not blow out or even bulge. Once they are run on a vehicle, then the dynamics of load/heat/pressure/directionality all change if they are put in a different work environment!

This is from where the bulges and bumps originate!

It's a madhouse lifestyle inside the cord layers - and rotating the tire to a different position makes the cords work under a lot of stress with which they are not prepared to comply.

The only caveat I can offer here is that with new rubber compounds, better cords and better knowledge of how things work inside tires, a front-to-rear rotation MIGHT be accomplishable without any dire consequences. maybe.

But never for Michelins! I don't even like their motorcycle tires.

Here's some tips I've gleaned over the years as a tire-seller and an anal-retentive user:
  1. At least once-a-month ---> look at and physically (with your flat hand) feel the tire tread. It should never have any sharp edges on it. (OK - 'never' is mebee a harsh word)
  2. Tires that have a sharp or feathered edge on the tread blocks, are out of alignment, underinflated or can be certain grades of manufacturer defective.
  3. Using a real digital pressure gauge, check the pressure in either A front or A rear tire to see what the pressure is like in a tire that has no tread wear or patterning problems.
  4. If you find a good wear pattern on (as an example here) A rear tire, then bring the other rear tire to the same pressure as the first one.
  5. Do this same thing to the front pair. Test a good looking/wearing tire against the other and even them out for pressure.
  6. In reality, most tires will require different pressures in front-to-back loading situations. (Check your door sticker)
About # 1 above --- if there is a buzzsaw type pattern ( ↓ ) on the tread blocks, then there are a few possible causes.

heel-toe feathering.jpg


ONE is a rotational pattern that is actually a defect in the tire design.


Here's ↓ an example of hard braking or accelerating (this shows on 4WDs a lot).

overly hard braking or accelerating.jpg


Here's an exaggerated view ↓ of block feathering:

rotational feathering(exaggerated).jpg


In REAL LIFE - tires are not perfect and there MAY be some fore-rear feathering to the tread blocks.

Some other scary tire pictures.......

total cord failure.jpg


THIS is an instant KILLER! ↑


This may ALSO be very thin brake friction material on the pads. It causes hot spots on the rotor(s) that you can feel in the steering wheel or your braking foot. If it gets bad enough, it will rattle the windows and shake the front end.
A perfect design will never have any sharp, hooked, feathered edges on them because they are all supposed to strike the roadway with even pressure and no untoward tread wear will happen.

tread bulge.jpg


This ↑ will be a fatality............


big bulge (not photoshopped).jpg


This ↑ is NOT photoshopped! I have personally seen this not just a few times!
 

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Ba-nan-nah-nuh
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Delamination. Manufacturing defect.
Not necessarily - it can be cause from a hard impact or (and this has recently become much more of a liability) the age of the tire.

Tire start to age the moment they come out of the molds and their USE-BY date has to be computed from the Julian date of birth on the sidewall.

Tires stored for years on shelves and that get ozone or sunshine or extreme heat on them, are just going bad like milk or bread.

Tire parked on concrete are subject to ozone and if they aren't moved for a long time - maybe a few months, they can create separations too.

"Delamination" is a catchall phrase for the loss of inner tire airtight integrity
It can be from freezing (I had that happen to me once here in Montana)
It can be a manufacturer's defect .. but not very likely.
It's more likely a road damage-thingy.​
 

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You are saying no to rotating tires? I go front back @10k miles. I replace due to age, cracks, weathered before wear mostly in CO. MN wear, extreme age. (Over 15 yrs) but still fine.
 
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