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What's the general consensus out there with CZ 75s?

What's your experience specifically with the trigger return springs?

The gun itself is solid, but do you trust the trigger return spring? Are they materially made with inferior metals? Is the design that bad that... Or is it all internet hype?

I like CZs...and Glocks...and Berettas..and 1911. But it seems that when it comes to CZ...it's the one associated with bad trigger springs.

Like to hear your thoughts.
 

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I've only heard of it with very high round count guns like in competition.

Never experienced it but replaced it and the pin it rides on when I did a 10,000 round maintenance on my 75B. Just regular maintenance item like any springs in any gun.

I have no problem with my gun for CCW. Only problem I have with CZ's are the **** small springs if you ever disassemble the sear cage.
 

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Reliable and accurate. Also very heavy over time if you're used to carrying a polymer gun.
 

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I have a CZ75B and I think it would be a good carry gun although I do not carry mine. I prefer my Glock for that role.

I have heard of trigger return springs failing, but have not experienced it myself. If worried about it, just make periodic replacement a part of your maintenance. The springs are not expensive.
 

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In the competition world there are many jokes about CZ trigger return spring being changed frequently. This is mainly from guys who shoot 5,000-10,000 rounds a year, and more importantly dry fire a 5 hours week. They also often replace their factory return springs with lighter aftermarket versions.

My take is that information may well have some validity for that small group of people in that tiny bubble, it’s way overblown for 99% of the real world.
 

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I shot an 85 Combat (same as a 75) in IDPA for some time. Never had a malfunction that I can recall. Great gun. I never heard of the spring issue. All guns that are shot a lot, Glocks included, will require parts (including springs) replacement.
 

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CZ 75 reliable?
Until this became a "Glock world" the CZ 75 was THE most common pistol in use outside of the USA.

If one is worried about the trigger return spring they should get one from CGW install it and keep the OEM for a spare.
CGW springs are well made and heat treated. Its a $7 part....
https://cajungunworks.com/product/rp-trs-reduced-power-trigger-return-spring/

As for carrying a CZ I would personally look at the PCR or P01 models. They are G19 size and weigh just slightly more than a G19 as they have aluminum frames. Way more sexy than a G19!
My newest CZ carry gun is a clone actually. A Tristar C100 and I love it!
Gun Firearm Photograph White Trigger
 

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Tanfo uses the same TRS, so I have them in my Stock 2's. I don't need to replace them proactively under current circumstances, and have broken 3 in a little under 2 years. Guess I would estimate they are good for 25-50k cycles.

Reliability and durability are not the same thing. Yes, I think the 75 is plenty reliable for carry, and the overall gun is certainly more durable than a Glock. But that's not necessarily true of each individual part. So you need to be aware of reasonable replacement intervals.

I recommend using a floating pin for the trigger, which makes replacing the TRS much easier, whether or not the gun is assembled. I've done one TRS at the range during a shooting session, although I did have a friend hold the grip for me. It would be pretty hard to do solo with the gun assembled and no vise or other means of supporting the frame.

I would say probably plan to replace the TRS when you take the lower apart for cleaning, and then possibly once between cleanings, depending on how much you cycle it. That's assuming you want to do it proactively.

Another thing to be aware of with the CZ (as opposed to the Tanfo) is failure of the slide stop. That would also be a part to keep on hand.

My general approach to stuff like this is to have 1 main practice/volume gun, and then at least 1 other fully prepped gun on deck. Prove both guns, put one up, put all the wear on the main gun, and see when things need to be done.

If you're in a situation where you may need to replace something quickly (major match, multi-day class, etc.) just bring a backup gun. If the main gun fails, bag it and go to the backup. Don't even worry about fixing the main gun until you get done with your shooting.
 

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Tanfo uses the same TRS, so I have them in my Stock 2's. I don't need to replace them proactively under current circumstances, and have broken 3 in a little under 2 years. Guess I would estimate they are good for 25-50k cycles.

Reliability and durability are not the same thing. Yes, I think the 75 is plenty reliable for carry, and the overall gun is certainly more durable than a Glock. But that's not necessarily true of each individual part. So you need to be aware of reasonable replacement intervals.

I recommend using a floating pin for the trigger, which makes replacing the TRS much easier, whether or not the gun is assembled. I've done one TRS at the range during a shooting session, although I did have a friend hold the grip for me. It would be pretty hard to do solo with the gun assembled and no vise or other means of supporting the frame.

I would say probably plan to replace the TRS when you take the lower apart for cleaning, and then possibly once between cleanings, depending on how much you cycle it. That's assuming you want to do it proactively.

Another thing to be aware of with the CZ (as opposed to the Tanfo) is failure of the slide stop. That would also be a part to keep on hand.
The CZ has been around long enough that the weaknesses are well know to be the TRS and the slide stop.
However both usually won't fail until very high round counts are reached.
If you plan on shooting your CZ tons then keep some springs and a slide stop or 2 in your spare parts bin.
Similar to a Beretta 92. If you shoot it a lot keep an extra locking block on hand....
If you are gonna buy one and shoot it only occasionally, you have nothing to worry about.
 

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The CZ has been around long enough that the weaknesses are well know to be the TRS and the slide stop.
However both usually won't fail until very high round counts are reached.
If you plan on shooting your CZ tons then keep some springs and a slide stop or 2 in your spare parts bin.
Similar to a Beretta 92. If you shoot it a lot keep an extra locking block on hand....
If you are gonna buy one and shoot it only occasionally, you have nothing to worry about.
The TRS is definitely not a "very high round count" part. Depending on how much a person shoots (including dry fire) it might last 2 months.
 

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What's the general consensus out there with CZ 75s?

What's your experience specifically with the trigger return springs?

The gun itself is solid, but do you trust the trigger return spring? Are they materially made with inferior metals? Is the design that bad that... Or is it all internet hype?

I like CZs...and Glocks...and Berettas..and 1911. But it seems that when it comes to CZ...it's the one associated with bad trigger springs.

Like to hear your thoughts.
They're great guns but a little too heavy and bulky for 24-7-365 IWB carry and the only one I'd consider for defensive purposes would be the single action only CZ75 SA carried cocked and locked. Not because of any supposed trigger return spring "Issues" , but because I just don't like DA/SA/Decockers.

 

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Tanfo uses the same TRS, so I have them in my Stock 2's. I don't need to replace them proactively under current circumstances, and have broken 3 in a little under 2 years. Guess I would estimate they are good for 25-50k cycles.

Reliability and durability are not the same thing. Yes, I think the 75 is plenty reliable for carry, and the overall gun is certainly more durable than a Glock. But that's not necessarily true of each individual part. So you need to be aware of reasonable replacement intervals.

I recommend using a floating pin for the trigger, which makes replacing the TRS much easier, whether or not the gun is assembled. I've done one TRS at the range during a shooting session, although I did have a friend hold the grip for me. It would be pretty hard to do solo with the gun assembled and no vise or other means of supporting the frame.

I would say probably plan to replace the TRS when you take the lower apart for cleaning, and then possibly once between cleanings, depending on how much you cycle it. That's assuming you want to do it proactively.

Another thing to be aware of with the CZ (as opposed to the Tanfo) is failure of the slide stop. That would also be a part to keep on hand.

My general approach to stuff like this is to have 1 main practice/volume gun, and then at least 1 other fully prepped gun on deck. Prove both guns, put one up, put all the wear on the main gun, and see when things need to be done.

If you're in a situation where you may need to replace something quickly (major match, multi-day class, etc.) just bring a backup gun. If the main gun fails, bag it and go to the backup. Don't even worry about fixing the main gun until you get done with your shooting.
This is a very good posting, with alot of excellent points applicable to anyone who carries a pistol .
 

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The TRS is definitely not a "very high round count" part. Depending on how much a person shoots (including dry fire) it might last 2 months.
I try to never say something along the lines of: "Hogwash!" in these discussions, and I will definitely not say that it is impossible for one to fail in two months, but I own or have owned numerous 75s, 85s, 75Bs and 85Bs, and I shoot quite a bit. And yes, I also dry fire. So far, no such failure. When I was stationed in Germany in the late 80s/early 90s, everyone on my team owned a 75 or an 85 (they were relatively cheap, and you were allowed to import one on return to CONUS). When they decided to replace the 1911s with M9s, they stocked up on 9mm ammo, but the M9s took way longer to come than anticipated, so our command gave us permission to use privately owned pistols (as long as they were Berettas or CZs). We shot the sh_t out of them. No problems.
 

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I try to never say something along the lines of: "Hogwash!" in these discussions, and I will definitely not say that it is impossible for one to fail in two months, but I own or have owned numerous 75s, 85s, 75Bs and 85Bs, and I shoot quite a bit. And yes, I also dry fire. So far, no such failure. When I was stationed in Germany in the late 80s/early 90s, everyone on my team owned a 75 or an 85 (they were relatively cheap, and you were allowed to import one on return to CONUS). When they decided to replace the 1911s with M9s, they stocked up on 9mm ammo, but the M9s took way longer to come than anticipated, so our command gave us permission to use privately owned pistols (as long as they were Berettas or CZs). We shot the sh_t out of them. No problems.
It doesn't have anything to do with how many guns you own, where or when your were stationed, what your guns cost, how many people were on your team, import restrictions, whether you decided to switch platforms, what your commander gave you permission to do, or any other such thing.

It's just a matter of how many times the spring gets cycled. And I'm simply commenting from my personal experience with the spring in question. That is what O/P asked for.
 
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