Cutlery sets - what to get?

Discussion in 'Food Forum' started by MeanMike, Nov 3, 2004.

  1. MeanMike

    MeanMike

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    Im looking for a set that will last a long time. Dont mind spending a bit of money on quality.

    What are some good brands?
     
  2. grantglock

    grantglock /dev/null

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  3. JPinAZ

    JPinAZ

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    Unless someone else is getting them for, I'd highly recommend you buy them piecemeal. You'll probably spend a bit more, but you'll end up with knives you'll actually use.
     
  4. pluvo

    pluvo Experiment G26

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    I agree with JP, buying a piece or two at a time is the way to go.

    A 3 peice set consisting of an 8" chef's knife, a 4-6" paring/utility knife, and a steel will handle pretty much everything.

    A serrated knife is kind of a unitasker, but nothing works better for bread.

    A slicer & serving fork set are nice for holidays, but you can get by with that chef's knife. I say I use my chef's knife for 90% of my cutlery needs.

    As to brands, you can't really go wrong with any of the big names (Wusthof, Henckels, etc.) and you can find some good prices online. My 10+ year old set of Mundial knives are due to be replaced. I'm eyeballing Global knives as replacements because I like the feel and the one-piece construction.

    The chicago knives a good deal too, a cheap knife that you can sharpen yourself. They were good enough for my Mom. You can probably get a whole set for less than you'd pay for a single chef's from a big brand.

    I've heard that there is a surprisingly cheap but high quality brand (Lamson maybe?) available from restaurant supply stores. Might be worth looking into.

    Another important thing to remember is that using the steel EVERY time is essential to keeping your blades true. Depending on use, you will also need to get them sharpened once year or so. This runs about $1.00 per inch.
     
  5. MeanMike

    MeanMike

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    thats one of the problems im having... for me, i cant tell which one is a good brand name and what isnt?

    So we have Wusthof, Henckels.. anyone think of any others?
     
  6. Glockerel

    Glockerel Got Mojo?

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    Get Wusthof Trident or Henckles. Either are great.
    8" Chefs
    4" Paring
    6" Boner- hold it fellas!
    12" Serrated
    A heavy Cleaver is nice too.

    I'm a chef and these are my daily tools.
     
  7. Miss Maggie

    Miss Maggie

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    Keep check at Sam's Club from now til Christmas. Last year we bought a set of Wustolf's having several knives, the scissors, the sharpener, and the block from them. We found them on clearance for $79.00. Sam'[s got in huge pallets for Christmas and what didn't sell, they dropped drastically at the last minute.
     
  8. Santa CruZin

    Santa CruZin Searching

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    I use Wusthof Trident. I started with an average set and block, and added a few pieces to tailor my needs.
     
  9. MrsKitty

    MrsKitty

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    Serrated knifes are great for tomatoes too ;)

    I like Wusthof Grand Prix the best but would be happy with others. Between Wusthoff's Grand Prix and Classic and Henkels Five Star and Four Star, you can't go wrong. Pick the one you like the feel of in your hand the best.

    To decide what I liked the best, I bought several paring knives for about $25 each. Then I bought a chef's knife for $60 on sale. Once I was sure I liked the way they felt in my hand, I bought a block.
     
  10. Weaps

    Weaps Drives A Jeep

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    I find myself using exactly two knives during the course of my cooking: An 8" Chefs knife and a 6" meat cleaver. Both of them Farberware. They work great.

    Now, you might say "Farberware? Geez, how cheap!" and you would be right, they are very cheap knives. However I make up for this by keeping both of them nearly razor sharp with a Lansky sharpening jig set, and most recently steeling them before each use. With the steel I now only need to give both knives a quick honing with the Lansky (medium then fine stone...occasionally the coarse stone when there is an oops which causes the occasional nick in the edge..usually caused by my wife) once every two weeks.

    Keeping them super sharp makes all the difference since it doesn't really matter about the balance or feel since they both slice through just about anything I cook as if it isn't there. I even constructed a block to store them in from a couple of 1x1 foot oak planks, some pine, and dowels. This is affixed to our kitchen island so that they will be kept safe and away from edge degrading drawer denizens.

    The meat cleaver is only used for meat, the chefs knife for everything else. After a honing session I give each knife the "tomato test." Each knife must be capable of slicing a cherry or grape tomato into translucent, paper thin slices.
     
  11. cmzneb

    cmzneb

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    I'm a Chef, using a knife daily is what I do.

    Save your money... Don't buy Heckels or Wustof. Yes they are well made, but they are waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay overpriced. And actually they are not as comfortable to use.

    Find a restaurant supply store and look for Dexter Russell knives. These are the best, affordable, long lasting, comfortable to hold knives I have ever used.

    I have knives of all the above mentioned brands and honestly the only ones that get any use in my restaurant, and my home are the Dexter Russell.

    If your more concerned though with how they will look displayed on your counter, then get the expensive henckels or wustoff.
     
  12. jason10mm

    jason10mm NRA-GOA-TSRA

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    After fondleing a bunch, I settled on the Wusthof Grand Prix. Most confortable, better balance, and not terribly expensive (compared to other top-end knives) if you look for deals.
     
  13. lwt210

    lwt210

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    Whatever brand you settle on, make sure that the blades are forged as opposed to stamped.

    We have Henckles and love them. We use them all from the cleaver right down to the steak knives.