close

Privacy guaranteed - Your email is not shared with anyone.

Coyote hunting with a rimfire?

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by romperstomper, Feb 2, 2006.

  1. romperstomper

    romperstomper Totentance

    Messages:
    174
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2005
    Location:
    Connecticut
    How many have done this? How successful have you been?

    I was looking at some of the stats and ballistics on the various .22 and .17 rimfires.

    It seems to me that the .17 M2 is very much a niche cartridge. Costs nearly as much as a .17HMR, has almost as flat a trajectory but only a fraction of the energy, especially past 50 yards. It doesn't even compare favorably against .22lr, especially the hotter CCI ammo. It seems like if you can judge distances well and you know the zero for your scope at 50 and 100 yards you are better off with the long rifle. I think it has a lot going for it against small game at 75 yards or less, especially if you are trying to make a quick head shot. Seems to be a poor rimfire choice for coyotes overall, though.

    The .17HMR is an interesting choice. In bulk you can pick it up for about $90 for a 500 round brick. Compared to .22lr that's fairly pricey, but you really wouldn't use this stuff as a plinker anyway. The trajectory is very flat and at ranges below 50 yards this stuff seems to be devastating. On the other hand, it's kind of a light round with little penetration, especially at 100 yardfs or more, thus negating some of the benefits of a flat trajectory.

    The .22lr is dirt cheap and has a lot of variety in terms of bullet weight and performance. The trajectory isn't anywhere near a .17 HMR though, but if a person knows how to adjust the scope and/or adjust his aim appropriately it should still be plenty accurate in capable hands. The new CCI "velocitor" seems to be specifically made for coyotes, as it has about the same energy at 100 yards as a .17 HMR but about 2.3 times the weight.
     
  2. mpol777

    mpol777 Feral Member

    Messages:
    1,680
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2001
    Location:
    Cochise County, AZ
    Rimfires are a poor choice for called coyotes. You WILL lose animals. You can lose an animal with any chambering, but your probability is much higher with any of the rimfires.

    Sure you could shoot 5 coyotes with a .22 mag and be fine. Shoot 10 and only lose one out of that. 90% isn't bad right? Well if you kill 60, 70 or 80 coyotes a year, that's horrible. As opposed to other chamberings where the percentage of lost animals, because of a failure of the tool used, is much lower.

    The rimfire craze bothers me more than folks who go overbore and blow big holes in coyotes. Simply because I'd rather the coyote died quickly and was unusable than allowed to suffer as he ran off into the mesquite. I've heard the "I just shoot them in the head or the heart", internet ramblings. That might convince other folks, but I know what a heart shot coyote does and where and how big that organ is. I also know about how things happen on a stand and that 'perfect' shots are hard to come by. It's not bench resting after prarie dogs.

    I make no claim to be an expert, but that's my two bits.
     

  3. romperstomper

    romperstomper Totentance

    Messages:
    174
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2005
    Location:
    Connecticut
    I completely agree with everything you have said. I think that hunting coyotes with a rimfire should be left to very disciplined and highly skilled shooters who are capable of regularly getting a clean head shot or letting the coyote go if it doesn't get within appropriate range. However, because of these serious restrictions hunting coyotes with a .22lr is a huge challenge in terms of developing good hunting skills and proper shooting skills. I've read different things about calling coyotes and it seems that having them come in w/in 100 yards is completely realistic.

    And I'm not even considering the .22WMR. Any place where I can use that round I can use .223.
     
  4. tjpet

    tjpet

    Messages:
    3,062
    Likes Received:
    1,485
    Joined:
    May 14, 2001
    Location:
    Utah-Idaho border
    The standard Winchester .22mag HP ammo works fine on coyotes as long as they're close enough. Head shot they drop in their tracks, lung hit and they'll run a short way before piling up. Not my first choice for a dedicated dog round but it'll get the job done when it has to.
     
  5. noway

    noway

    Messages:
    8,735
    Likes Received:
    7
    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2000
    Location:
    Davie "Cowboy" , FL
    ditto romperstomper has it right use a 223rem on them and save the 22mag for something else or if you can get the yote in below 50-75yards.


    Yes you "hear" on these internet forums people shooting ground squirrels and coyotes at these unbelievable ranges and trying to make it seems like it so doable. I have a 22mag bolt action and would never phantom trying to kill a coyote at 150yards. Not even on a good day, with a benchrest ;)

    223/22-250/204ruger/243 are all better calibers for hunting a 35lb dog like creature imho ;)
     
  6. 8-Ball

    8-Ball Old Soul

    Messages:
    3,941
    Likes Received:
    52
    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2004
    Location:
    Illinois
    I went once with a .22LR and my buddy had a .17HMR. It was a mistake.

    I now use .243WIN, 7.62x39, or 5.45x39. .223 or .22-250 would be good, but I don't have one.
     
  7. GeorgiaGlockMan

    GeorgiaGlockMan Aggie in Exile.

    Messages:
    1,332
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2003
    Location:
    Bad-Lands Ranch
    The only coyotes I've shot in my life were with a 30-06 as a by product of deer hunting when I lived/grew-up in Texas.

    The 30-06 was a smack-down and definately overkill if you wanted the pelts.

    The .17 HMR is a caliber that in my opinion is better suited for something the size of a rabbit. I've also used them for cleaning a multitude of sunning turtles out of a buddy's tank at long distances.

    I'd equate taking a coyote with a .17 MHR to harvesting a deer with a 5.56. It can be done but like others said it isn't your best choice of caliber if given an option.

    I would prefer an AR-15 for coyotes. Why? Because it's alot of firepower on tap, caliber appropriate and low recoil for quick follow-up shots on a running dog.



    Not related to the caliber discussion, but since we're talking yotes I thought this would be a good place for this .............

    I got a new place (250 acres) here in GA that seems to be over run with coyotes. Got several real good pics of them running the pine tree edge and sign all over the roads.

    Our first night out with a Fox-Pro FX3 a couple of weeks ago, I thought it was going to be a slam dunk.

    The FX3 really does a good job of bringing them in - well at least to the tree line where they holed up just howling at us. We had several groups going nuts all around us (alot closer than 50 yds) and I am sure that we were busted as the first groups we called in left barking away from our location. We even spot lighted one on another stand but my shooter was asleep at the gun.

    I went out again this Friday am by myself and was hoping for different results but never could get them out into the open. I guess they don't call them wyle for nothing.

    Friday night, after watching Byron South's "Coming to the Call 3 - Calling in the Thick Stuff", I have a new approach that should yield some positive results. I only wish I would have watched that DVD BEFORE I went hunting Friday am. Oh well. I am going to give them a couple of weeks and then go back out in the am, use the property's roads against them and lighten up on the amount of howling I throw at them.

    I think I am starting to enjoy targeting coyotes as much as deer hunting. At least, it gives me something to bide my time until deer season starts again.

    Happy Hunting.
     
  8. CCF

    CCF

    Messages:
    260
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2006
    Location:
    Broken Arrow, OK
    I recently moved & they're thick around my new place. Since you have experience, would you help me out a little bit? I haven't hunted in ages, but want to get back into it. The coyotes would be a good place to start, LOL. Plus, their pelts will bring in some extra income. :)

    I'm thinking about getting a Mini-14 Ranch Rifle. Ruger brought the twist down to 1:9 & they're a lot more accurate than they used to be. I can get a stainless for a little over $500. Anyway, what type of scope do you recommend? Can they be hunted during the day? Where do you get the call you talked about? Anything & everything you (or anyone else) can tell me about hunting 'yotes would be appreciated. Thanks.
     
  9. GeorgiaGlockMan

    GeorgiaGlockMan Aggie in Exile.

    Messages:
    1,332
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2003
    Location:
    Bad-Lands Ranch
    go to www.gofoxpro.com for the new FX3 caller. It is great, not the cheapest one out there but in my research probably the best one available.

    I don't care much for the ruger mini-14s. The ones I've shot have been jam-masters with poor at best accuracy. Others have different opinions. Everyone that I know (except for one guy) that has had one has gotten rid of it and bought an AR as a replacement. You'd probably be saving yourself some $s by buying and AR-15 1st.

    If you are by yourself daytime is probably the best time to go. It is difficult to run a spot light and rifle at the same time even if it is a scope mounted light. If I could use 12V scope lights in GA I'd buy a Lightforce light. We are limited to 6V in GA. It can be done, but I'd go in the daytime first.

    Morning at 1st light and evening 1 hr before dark would be the best time based on my limited yote experience.

    There are several good predator forums that could give you alot more info than I could ever hope to being a relative hunting novice compared to some of these guys on there that do it for a living.

    Randy Anderson and Byron South both have 1st class yote hunting videos. Google them to find out where to buy them. That'd be the fastest way to sharpen your skills. Mine are pretty dull if you are looking at if from a dog body count perspective.

    I think deer are alot easier animal to kill than a coyote. If you sharpen your skills on coyotes by the time deer season rolls around you should be a slayer (or at least your general hunting skills and woodsmanship skills will be much improved).

    Happy Hunting!
     
  10. CCF

    CCF

    Messages:
    260
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2006
    Location:
    Broken Arrow, OK
    Much appreciated, GeorgiaGlockMan. :thumbsup:
     
  11. jimmygun

    jimmygun

    Messages:
    58
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2006
    Location:
    South Texas
    I agree .223 is the perfect varmint caliber, but let me tell you I was shooting cans at my uncle's ranch I decided to take a stroll I had my rem 597 with 3-9x40 scope and cci velocitor in the magazine I was going for cotton tails I saw a coyote around 60 to 75 yds I got on the ground and I put a shot in the heart lung area, it was munching on something I had a enough time to place the shot, it took off my uncle and myself went looking for it the next morning we found it dead like 50 yards away, and this also might sound crazy but I saw my friend's uncle put a javalina down with his 22WMR head shot at 50 or 75 yds, I couldn't believe it I usually use 30-30 win for that kind of animal. My point is it can be done at not to long distance with the right tool at the right time, but its not like an everyday thing well at least not for me. I stick to plinking, hog hunting, deer hunting, some dove and quail, cotton tail and if a coyote gets in the way I'll shoot it.
     
  12. Sturmgewehr44

    Sturmgewehr44

    Messages:
    149
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2005
    Location:
    United States
    Read my reply on the post called, "Hunting bobcat in NC."
     
  13. collim1

    collim1 Shower Time!

    Messages:
    8,918
    Likes Received:
    3,173
    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2005
    Location:
    USA
    .243 is my favorite round.

    80g for coyotes, 100g for deer. I keep all of my shots within 200 yds and have no reservations using a .243 for deer or varmints.

    A Rem 700 w/ composite stock and detach mag, with a leupold 3-9x40 has proven to be the best gun investment I ever made.

    .223 is also a great varmint round (am I wrong for incuding coyotes as varmints?) and it is really fun to hunt with a AR.