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Coyote hunters--questions..

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by Dogbite, Sep 6, 2004.

  1. Dogbite

    Dogbite DNT TREAD ON ME

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    I read somewhere that if you are hunting coyotes when the wind is over about 10 mph,you are wasting your time.Have you guys found this to be true? I am new to coyote hunting,so i may have some more questions later.Thanks for all your info!!
     
  2. 2240

    2240

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    Not necessarily wasting your time but the odds decrease dramatically. You've got a couple of things going against you. #1, the sounds travel a lot less because you should be calling into the wind. #2, dogs will almost always circle down wind and scent you further out with a good breeze. The ideal set up would be a high vantage point so you can see them way out there before they start circling or position yourself in a steep sided canyon or wash so that the dog would have a hard time climbing up and circling. The sound also carry further down the canyon. Sometimes the weather never cooperates on the day that you can go hunting. Nevertheless, any days afield is better than none. Good luck.
     

  3. muddydog

    muddydog

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    what he said....;z

    remember to make your shot count..
    because you'll probably only get shot. coyotes are very smart and have a great memory.
     
  4. lomfs24

    lomfs24

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    The last one I saw forgot to duck when he saw the AR-15 come out. ;f
     
  5. MARTIN FISHER

    MARTIN FISHER

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    Coyote hunting is always good a time, even if you don't see a coyote. BTW, I called one in on last weekend, it is still too early around here, as it was very small.
     
  6. sharpshooter

    sharpshooter Member Millennium Member

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    Wind does not effect your calling sounds the way most people think it does. The sounds from your dying rabbit call are traveling at the speed of sound. The wind is blowing 10mph. Think about it. The wind is not "blowing" your sound anywhere. There is no "sound cone" like there is a scent cone following you downwind. That's silly.

    What's happening is that the wind causes ambient noise that can cover your calling sounds. Weeds blowing, leaves rustling, wind howling, etc. Your calling sound goes out in all directions at a pretty much equal rate, depending on terrain of course.

    Coyotes use their eyes, ears, and nose for hunting. They can hear very very well, they can pinpoint movement from very far away, and they can smell prey extremely well.

    When the wind is blowing, it's harder for them to pick out noises, it's harder for them to distinguish movement since everything is moving, and it's harder for them to pick up scent. Coyotes are more leery to venture out in bad weather for those reasons. It's not a waste of time, but it's usually harder to get them to respond. On Randy Anderson's videos, he's got a couple of successful hunts while the wind is blowing pretty good. He comments that most hunters wouldn't even come out in that type of weather. But it worked for him on that day.

    Deer are the same way, they'll tend to bed down because everything is spooky out there. On a windy afternoon you're more likely to "jump" deer than on a calm day when they're out grazing etc. You can get pretty close sometimes because the wind really helps cover the sound of your footsteps and your movement and your scent.
     
  7. tjpet

    tjpet

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    What we use on a windy day is a combination of calling and movement.

    Tie a piece of white fluff to a medium height bush/sagebrush in an area you're watching. Even with the wind blowing a call will get through to a degree. The call will bring them in so close and the slight bit of movement (from the fluff blowing in the wind) will finish the job.

    I've probably killed just as many coyotes that were curious about movement as they were about the noise from a call.
     
  8. Dogbite

    Dogbite DNT TREAD ON ME

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    Thanks for all the information guys!!
     
  9. CanyonMan

    CanyonMan In The Saddle

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    I don't hunt the yodel dogs anymore, but i can tell you for a certainty, that growing up on a ranch in N.W. Oklahoma, where the wind blows like crazy most of the time, and far more than 10-15 mph, it has not effected the hunting of the coyotes. "If they can hear ya," and your doing your part, "they will come." Calm is better, but, the wind, other than blowing the call sound around, never stopped us. They still got to eat, wind or no wind!

    We have hunted them on the plains in the dead of winter with the wind howling at speeds that the sleet and snow would almost cut your face off, and visibility was a real joke. Then, out of no where, there would stand two, three, sometimes four, ghostly gray figures in the deep snow, looking for a wounded rabbit...

    Wind or not.... Go!


    CanyonMan
     
  10. mpol777

    mpol777 Feral Member

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    Last year in January I was out and the wind was blowing pretty good. My partner and I set up on a small hill overlooking a flat spot with the thick mesquite 350 yards out at the closest point. I saw a coyote come in from the right down a trail. I spotted him when he was about 550 yards out. I started concentrating on him and got the scope up. He checked up at about 325 and I popped him. I had a bit of luck on that one.

    Anyway my partner saw a 2 more that I didn't. One was up close at about 60 yards right unde my nose. ;g So we tracked them back to where they came from. As far as were could tell the old girl I shot came from about 1/2 mile away then lost the tracks in the brush. Even though the wind was blowing and we were calling crosswind these coyotes came out of the thick stuff to take a gander at a possible dinner.
     
  11. sharpshooter

    sharpshooter Member Millennium Member

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    Well yeah, if it's always windy in your area, then of course dogs adapt and are not bothered by the wind.

    But if your hunting area is not typically windy, and you've got a bunch of wind on a day with lots of weather, that's different.

    Just like if it rains every day (Oregon) coyotes don't mind hunting in the rain. But if it's raining in AZ during the summer, you might want to wait for another day. They're gonna be all denned up and waiting it out.
     
  12. RMTactical

    RMTactical Battle Born CLM

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    They are smart buggers, they tend to be more aware of their surroundings than us humans. That comes from hunting and being hunted.
     
  13. MARTIN FISHER

    MARTIN FISHER

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    Hey GL,

    When are you going to be in AZ so we can hunt?
     
  14. RMTactical

    RMTactical Battle Born CLM

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    Not sure, my wife drags me up to Utah every month so I waste all of my vacation time up there.

    One of these days...