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I read somewhere that taking NSAIDS to help reactions to the vaccine, fever, aches, etc can interfere with the processes building immunity, since the reactions are part of the immune system’s process to develop immunity.

Any truth to that? Or misinformation?

Randy


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Make It So!!
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I read somewhere that taking NSAIDS to help reactions to the vaccine, fever, aches, etc can interfere with the processes building immunity, since the reactions are part of the immune system’s process to develop immunity.

Any truth to that? Or misinformation?

Randy


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Yes and no. Will NSAID interfere with the intended immune response from vaccine? Maybe to a small degree. Same goes for Tylenol, perhaps to an even smaller degree. The intent of the message is mainly to discourage routine "pre-medication" with NSAIDs or Tylenol before COVID vaccine, since a fair percentage of elderly patients (who are first in line to receive the vaccine) should not take NSAID unsupervised. NSAID is actually not a benign medication, and can have significant unintended consequences in folks with pre-existing chronic diseases.
 

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Now, your concerns are valid ones. Yes, there are people who have really, really bad reactions to the two current COVID vaccines. Rare as they may be, really bad adverse reactions, including a few possible vaccine-related deaths, have been reported. However, we need to put everything in life into context. Nothing is risk free in life. More people have been killed by drinking too much water than have died from these COVID vaccines. And certainly countless more have died from COVID than the vaccine. Heck, many more people have died from or had serious complications from common OTC medications such as Tylenol or Ibuprofen than from the COVID vaccines. Point is, life is a series of risk and benefit analysis. All we can do is learn as much as we can and make informed choices.

FWIW, while there are certainly doctors in the community who are wary of the current COVID vaccines, overwhelming vast majority of academic physicians (those of us who teach and research medicine for a living) took the vaccine as soon as it came out. I got mine first shot within 3 days of the FDA emergency approval - the time it took Pfizer to send us the very first batch of vaccines. And yes, my second shot was a bit rough and unpleasant for 12 hours or so. Other than those who have clear medical contraindications, every one of my academic co-workers have received the vaccine early on. Perhaps that says something about the confidence we have in the vaccine even with some of the uncertainties.
What are your thoughts on kids getting it? I know they are currently in trials with kids as young as 12, and mine are significantly younger than that.
 

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I think you’re being snarky? If so I’d counter with the fact that we’re 2 months in and I’m guessing hundreds of thousands of vaccines given with no vast extensive damage from a harmful vaccine...
I‘m a proponent of the vaccine and I’ve had both Pfizer shots. I don’t think China is in cahoots with big pharma to weaponize the vaccine and I don’t believe it will have harmful long-term effects. I’m ready to get back to normal.
 

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Wife and I are going tomorrow to get the first shot. Should be interesting.
It will be a non-event unless you have a hard time getting parked. Go for it with confidence you are gonna be safe from COVID shortly after shot #2.
 

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What are your thoughts on kids getting it? I know they are currently in trials with kids as young as 12, and mine are significantly younger than that.
I'm not a pediatrician and physiologically children are not just smaller versions of adults. With that said, I'm not aware of any major biochemical reasons why children will react differently than adults to these mRNA vaccines. I do work with many academic pediatricians, and all of them are eager to have their children immunized with these vaccines when they are available.

Clinical trials involving children are traditionally very difficult to get approved, for many good bioethical reasons. This is why children were not included in the initial COVID vaccine trials. It's not because of some known risks specific to young children.
 

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Went to the VA for my first shot of Pfizer last week. I was very tired that night, but my arm wasn't sore like others reported. Bracing for the second shot which everyone I talk to says is the doozy. My buddy had COVID early on and he said the effects of his second shot were like having COVID again, but this time it was like COVID on steroids.
 

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I'm not a pediatrician and physiologically children are not just smaller versions of adults. With that said, I'm not aware of any major biochemical reasons why children will react differently than adults to these mRNA vaccines. I do work with many academic pediatricians, and all of them are eager to have their children immunized with these vaccines when they are available.

Clinical trials involving children are traditionally very difficult to get approved, for many good bioethical reasons. This is why children were not included in the initial COVID vaccine trials. It's not because of some known risks specific to young children.
I’m following it closely with the doctors at Children’s. My six year has a compromised immune system from chemo and he’s back at school. I’m a nervous wreck.
 

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I’m following it closely with the doctors at Children’s. My six year has a compromised immune system from chemo and he’s back at school. I’m a nervous wreck.
Your worry is perfectly understandable and reasonable. We have friends with immunocompromised kids. Some have chosen to keep their kids home with virtual learning even when their classmates have returned to in-person learning. Others have chosen to send their kids with as much protection as possible. All are eager to vaccinate their kids as soon as they are available.

Sounds like you have access to one of the children's hospitals (ones that are true academic children's hospitals like CH-LA, Boston CH, Cincinnati CH, Nationwide CH, Stanford CH, CH-Philly, Texas CH... etc just to name some of the top ones in no particular order). Your six-year old is in good hands.
 
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Went to the VA for my first shot of Pfizer last week. I was very tired that night, but my arm wasn't sore like others reported. Bracing for the second shot which everyone I talk to says is the doozy. My buddy had COVID early on and he said the effects of his second shot were like having COVID again, but this time it was like COVID on steroids.
Yes, the COVID vaccine, especially the second dose, will give you some idea how you might have reacted to the real thing as far as some of the non-fatal, non-serious immunological symptoms such as muscle aches, fever, fatigue...etc, you know, those that really suck but not gonna kill you type of symptoms. The differences between the vaccine and the real thing is, immune responses triggered by the vaccine is much more surgically precise compared to the real virus (so you avoid the serious/potentially fatal immune over-response triggered by the all-out immune response to the real virus). It also avoids the actual tissue damages (lung, heart, kidneys) done by the virus itself.
 

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Now that the Johnson and Johnson vaccine is out, here are some information and my thoughts -

The J&J vaccine uses an entirely different technology/approach from the two current vaccines (Pfizer/Moderna). J&J vaccine uses a "vector vaccine" technology with "replication incompetent adenovirus" as the vector. So what does that mean?

Pfizer/Moderna vaccines are mRNA vaccines as discussed before - it uses actual messenger RNA (mRNA), which are basically protein blue prints, and uses your own cells as the protein factory to make target viral proteins (S-protein in COVID). Your body's immune system then reacts and produces antibodies to this viral S-protein. And anti-S-protein antibodies are very effective in neutralizing the actual live COVID virus.

J&J vaccine takes a different approach. J&J's vaccine uses a vehicle (a "vector," a live adenovirus to be exact) to deliver DNA into your cells nucleus (where your own DNA's are), and uses your own cells DNA translation process to make mRNA's from the virus-delivered DNA. And these mRNA's are then used by your cell to make the COVID S-protein (like the Pfizer/Moderna mRNA vaccines). The vector adenovirus is designed to be "replication incompetent" - meaning, they can invade your cells like normal live viruses, but cannot be replicated (and spread to other cells) like other live viruses. This replication incompetent vector vaccine is not a new technology (still relatively new). It's been used in the Ebola vaccine, and is being investigated in various HIV vaccines currently in development.

Advantages of J&J vaccine - vector vaccines are much more "sturdier" than mRNA vaccines - both the vector virus itself and the DNA in carries are much tougher and can be stored in harsher environments. This is why J&J vaccine does not have to be deep-freezed. This makes transport/storage much easier. This type of vaccine also tend to have longer effects. mRNA's are naturally very short lived in our body. By using DNA, the effect is longer. This is likely why J&J is a single-shot vaccine.

Disadvantages of J&J vaccine - overall less effective than the Pfizer/Moderna vaccine. The exact reason for this is likely multifactorial. One of the main reason is, adenovirus is a very common virus that causes the common cold. So, the odds are, your body have seen many, many, many strains of adenovirus already in your lifetime and have developed immunities to these adenoviruses. So, if this particular strain of the vector adenovirus happens to be a strain your body has seen before and has developed immunity already, your body may destroy this vector adenovirus before it has the chance to "deliver its payload" into your cell's nucleus. So, this makes the vaccine less effective overall in the general population. Yes, when choosing vector viruses, we try to choose a strain that is not commonly seen in humans so few people have immunity to it. For example, chimpanzee adenovirus is one such favorite choice.

Other much, much, much less likely disadvantages (or problems) with vector virus vaccine are, live vector virus may mis-behave in your body if it recombinate ("mates") with other viruses in your body and mutates (this is very unlikely as vectors are carefully vetted, but not 100% impossible); the DNA payload may trigger unintended translation of segments of your own DNA that are not meant to be translated (very, very, unlikely, but if it does, this may, in very, very rare situations, cause unintended consequences ranging from cancer to other illnesses) - again, this is extremely unlikely to happen as there biochemical safeguards in place... but it is not 100%.

So, these are just some of the information and my thoughts on the new J&J vaccine.
 
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