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I had Covid and it really jacked me up so I took the Moderna hoping that I don't get it again. Not really worried about it otherwise.
 

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Discussion Starter #62
Scheduled finally for the 19th of February, had another test yesterday still negative, hope to make it to both shots.
 

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Well.... I'll find out how the 2nd shot is at the end of the day. Scheduled for this evening for the second shot.

Seems like a lot of people are experiencing "hangover" like symptoms. Should be interesting seeing as I haven't had an alcoholic drink in 18 years! lol
First shot sucked for me. Felt like crap for 2-3 days. Second shot I expected the same, or worse, but barely noticed anything.
 

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Good article on mRNA technology.

Covid vaccines are actually safe for those with compromised immune systems, unlike traditional vaccines.


Randy

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First shot sucked for me. Felt like crap for 2-3 days. Second shot I expected the same, or worse, but barely noticed anything.
I don't remember if I responded about my second shot... First shot was fine, second shot was fine until next day. All day I felt groggy, like I took a Benadryl or similar in the morning. Wasn't "bad" for me, just weirdly groggy.
 

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Got it, was supposed to be there at 07:30, I thought 1:30, they had me come back at 4:30 and I got a Pfizer for shot #1.
Round two March 12 at 07:30, I wont goof it this time.
Arm hurts like a flu shot was put in there, a little fugazy for a day, feel fine today.
 

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#2 Pfizer yesterday. Infection site starting to get sore like last time. Took a few days to see other mild symptoms last time.

Randy

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Good article on mRNA technology.

Covid vaccines are actually safe for those with compromised immune systems, unlike traditional vaccines.


Randy

Sent from my moto z4 using Tapatalk
A concise, optimistic article, and it's item number three that hasn't really surfaced in the mainstream conversation, and if anywhere close to realistic, holds unfathomably wonderful promise.

3. mRNA technology can be used in more than just vaccines. Although mRNA technology is new for vaccines, the technology is about 10 years old and is currently used in immunotherapy cancer treatments. “In immunotherapy, mRNA targets a specific part of the tumor, and your body makes antibodies to go against the cancer cells, which then attack the cancer cells. mRNA works the same way in immunotherapy as it does in vaccines—you figure out the most important thing to target, and then go after it,” says Dr. Weinmann.

The idea that any one of us will one day have the cells of our individual cancer affliction analyzed to identify a characteristic that differentiates those cells from our healthy cells, and that an individualized mRNA therapy will be concocted to cause our body to create antibodies that specifically target only the tumor cells bearing that characteristic while leaving normal cells alone is an absolute gamechanger. That's it, right there.
 

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Got the second Pfizer vaccine yesterday 2/20.

With the first dose I had muscle pain in my low/left back.

So far no side effects with the second dose.

I mentioned super powers and sarcasm to the wife. She said I already have those.

Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk
 

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Double tap.
 

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Got the second Pfizer vaccine yesterday 2/20.

With the first dose I had muscle pain in my low/left back.

So far no side effects with the second dose.

I mentioned super powers and sarcasm to the wife. She said I already have those.

Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk
I couldn’t tell if muscle pain was from first shot or shoveling all this damn snow...

So far no issues with second one, got it same day you did. Arm isn’t as sore, haven’t shoveled as much though...

Randy


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24hrs after second Moderna I had a headache and felt like I was getting a sinus infection. 6 hours later I was fine. Never got a fever like others did.
 

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Got my second Moderna today. Supposed to work tomorrow and I’m hoping I won’t get bad side effects.
 

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If you're over 70, or have serious medical issues, I can understand taking an, at best, experimental vaccine. If you are healthy, and not elderly, I don't see why you would risk taking a rushed mRNA vaccine. mRNA vaccines are in their infancy. I have had chronic issues since taking a HEP B vaccine 20+ years ago. No thanks.
 

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What the hell is a "vaccine ravaged country"?
“Ravage: cause severe and extensive damage to.“

Vaccine ravaged country: A country severely and extensively damaged due to vast numbers of its people taking a harmful vaccine.

It ain’t gonna happen Mike, so don’t worry about the definition.
 

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“Ravage: cause severe and extensive damage to.“

Vaccine ravaged country: A country severely and extensively damaged due to vast numbers of its people taking a harmful vaccine.

It ain’t gonna happen Mike, so don’t worry about the definition.
Lock down ravaged country would be accurate.
 
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Make It So!!
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I have had a negative shot reaction with long term health effects before.

And I am no doctor or scientist but wouldn’t catching covid do the same thing as the mRNA vaccine if it’s just to give your body the key to being able to fight it? So for those who have already had it, do they really need the shot?
Well a typical vaccine takes years to go to market and they have about 1-2 years of long term analysis on it, not 1-2 months. the long term analysis done on this vaccine was 12 weeks.

And I never said or implied I’m an anti-vaxxer.
Not meant to be medical advices. Just a few academic points that hopefully answer some questions.

1. Natural immunity from COVID infection does not last. It typically lasts about 3 months for most people. We are seeing re-infections, perhaps with different strains. Re-infection tend to be more severe than the original first infection for many people.

2. Natural immunity from COVID infection is not the same as vaccine-immunity. When your body is exposed to the real, live virus, it produces a variety of immune responses, including various antibodies to various parts of the virus. Problem is, not all of your body's immune response neutralizes the virus. It's like using a shotgun and hoping that one pellet is the kill shot. The remaining pellets can cause harm to your body. Your body also has to deal with the damages done by the actual virus itself. It's a double whammy. People who die from COVID tend to die from the immune-over-response from their own body.

3. Vaccine immunity is much more precise. It's like a surgical strike. In the case of COVID, the vaccine induces antibodies to the spike protein, and only the spike protein on the virus - and the spike protein is the most "antigenic" part of the virus - meaning, its the part that kills the virus if attacked by the antibody. And the part of the spike protein the mRNA vaccine (more on this later) induces/produces seem to be fairly constant across many different strains of COVID-19. There is zero possibility of the mRNA vaccine producing a real live virus - the parts are simply not there. You can't build a functional car if all you have is a windshield.

4. While mRNA and lipid nannoparticles have not been used in vaccines before, both technologies are not new. Both have been used in other therapeutic medications (even in combination) for over 10 to 20 years. So we have a very good idea what injecting mRNA and lipid nannoparticles do to human bodies. We've essentially had "safety trials" for over 10 to 20 years.

5. So what does mRNA do and why is it used to produce COVID vaccine? The short answer is, it is what has allowed us to produce the vaccine this quickly. "Traditional" vaccines are made of actual viral proteins (parts of the virus) for our body to react to it and produce antibodies. Replicating viral proteins precisely is not an easy task on a lab bench. It takes repeated attempts and failures to make "just the right one" that will fold into the right shape, and not containing extra or missing parts. As it turns out, our body is much, much, much better at making proteins than lab benches. We have something called ribosomes in our cells that are very, very, very awesome protein makers. mRNA is basically a "blue print" for the ribosome to make proteins. And mRNA's are easier to make precisely than proteins. Our body makes mRNA naturally from our DNA. So mRNA is not a completely foreign material in our body. And the injected mRNA, just like our own mRNA, is broken down by our body very quickly into harmless nucleotides (that our body already has, so it's not foreign).

As another poster has pointed out, mRNA has great potential to be a game changer in medical therapeutics in a variety of previously untreatable diseases.
 

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“Ravage: cause severe and extensive damage to.“

Vaccine ravaged country: A country severely and extensively damaged due to vast numbers of its people taking a harmful vaccine.

It ain’t gonna happen Mike, so don’t worry about the definition.
I think you’re being snarky? If so I’d counter with the fact that we’re 2 months in and I’m guessing hundreds of thousands of vaccines given with no vast extensive damage from a harmful vaccine...
 

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Not meant to be medical advices. Just a few academic points that hopefully answer some questions.

1. Natural immunity from COVID infection does not last. It typically lasts about 3 months for most people. We are seeing re-infections, perhaps with different strains. Re-infection tend to be more severe than the original first infection for many people.

2. Natural immunity from COVID infection is not the same as vaccine-immunity. When your body is exposed to the real, live virus, it produces a variety of immune responses, including various antibodies to various parts of the virus. Problem is, not all of your body's immune response neutralizes the virus. It's like using a shotgun and hoping that one pellet is the kill shot. The remaining pellets can cause harm to your body. Your body also has to deal with the damages done by the actual virus itself. It's a double whammy. People who die from COVID tend to die from the immune-over-response from their own body.

3. Vaccine immunity is much more precise. It's like a surgical strike. In the case of COVID, the vaccine induces antibodies to the spike protein, and only the spike protein on the virus - and the spike protein is the most "antigenic" part of the virus - meaning, its the part that kills the virus if attacked by the antibody. And the part of the spike protein the mRNA vaccine (more on this later) induces/produces seem to be fairly constant across many different strains of COVID-19. There is zero possibility of the mRNA vaccine producing a real live virus - the parts are simply not there. You can't build a functional car if all you have is a windshield.

4. While mRNA and lipid nannoparticles have not been used in vaccines before, both technologies are not new. Both have been used in other therapeutic medications (even in combination) for over 10 to 20 years. So we have a very good idea what injecting mRNA and lipid nannoparticles do to human bodies. We've essentially had "safety trials" for over 10 to 20 years.

5. So what does mRNA do and why is it used to produce COVID vaccine? The short answer is, it is what has allowed us to produce the vaccine this quickly. "Traditional" vaccines are made of actual viral proteins (parts of the virus) for our body to react to it and produce antibodies. Replicating viral proteins precisely is not an easy task on a lab bench. It takes repeated attempts and failures to make "just the right one" that will fold into the right shape, and not containing extra or missing parts. As it turns out, our body is much, much, much better at making proteins than lab benches. We have something called ribosomes in our cells that are very, very, very awesome protein makers. mRNA is basically a "blue print" for the ribosome to make proteins. And mRNA's are easier to make precisely than proteins. Our body makes mRNA naturally from our DNA. So mRNA is not a completely foreign material in our body. And the injected mRNA, just like our own mRNA, is broken down by our body very quickly into harmless nucleotides (that our body already has, so it's not foreign).

As another poster has pointed out, mRNA has great potential to be a game changer in medical therapeutics in a variety of previously untreatable diseases.
Thanks for the info. Always good to hear facts.
 

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Thanks for the info. Always good to hear facts.
Now, your concerns are valid ones. Yes, there are people who have really, really bad reactions to the two current COVID vaccines. Rare as they may be, really bad adverse reactions, including a few possible vaccine-related deaths, have been reported. However, we need to put everything in life into context. Nothing is risk free in life. More people have been killed by drinking too much water than have died from these COVID vaccines. And certainly countless more have died from COVID than the vaccine. Heck, many more people have died from or had serious complications from common OTC medications such as Tylenol or Ibuprofen than from the COVID vaccines. Point is, life is a series of risk and benefit analysis. All we can do is learn as much as we can and make informed choices.

FWIW, while there are certainly doctors in the community who are wary of the current COVID vaccines, overwhelming vast majority of academic physicians (those of us who teach and research medicine for a living) took the vaccine as soon as it came out. I got mine first shot within 3 days of the FDA emergency approval - the time it took Pfizer to send us the very first batch of vaccines. And yes, my second shot was a bit rough and unpleasant for 12 hours or so. Other than those who have clear medical contraindications, every one of my academic co-workers have received the vaccine early on. Perhaps that says something about the confidence we have in the vaccine even with some of the uncertainties.
 
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