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Just picked this one up, a really neat addition to the collection. Connelly was serving as a rifleman with the 180th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division when he was captured at Anzio in February 1944.
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Cool, thank you for collecting these dogtags and for connecting them to their owners. Very interesting.
 
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Very nice!!

Does the chip/snip at the end of the tag have any significance, or is it something that just randomly happened during it's life?
 

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Again thanks for posting this. While reading this I remembered that I had a box my 93 year old mother gave me with a bunch of letters and stuff from her brother. He served as a medic (Med Tech) during WWII. She gave it to me when she moved into a senior citizen's home. I never really looked at it before.

So I dug it out and started digging through it. Sure enough, I found his dog tags and his medic (red cross) armbands. Plus a Nazi armband and some medals. There are also hundreds of letters from 1941-45 I'm going to have to read and perhaps scan and save.

His discharge papers (as a Cpl) say he served in France, Central Europe, Rhineland and Africa. It also says he got 4 Bronze Stars.

I remember him telling me he was in the Battle of the Bulge and it was really bad there.

He had a tough time after the war. He worked as a Med Tech at the veterans' hospital but had mental issues, what is now called PTSD. He lived with us off and on in the 1960s and I remember being awakened with him screaming in the middle of the night. When I was in high school my dad and I had to go find him a couple times in the middle of the night after he ran off.

He coped with alcohol and eventually drank himself to death. But it was the war that killed him. It just took a lot longer.
 

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Very nice!!

Does the chip/snip at the end of the tag have any significance, or is it something that just randomly happened during it's life?
Thanks man! Commonly believed to be used to stick the notch between the teeth of servicemen who were killed in action, it’s actually just a notch that enables the stamping machine to secure a hold onto the tag
 

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Again thanks for posting this. While reading this I remembered that I had a box my 93 year old mother gave me with a bunch of letters and stuff from her brother. He served as a medic (Med Tech) during WWII. She gave it to me when she moved into a senior citizen's home. I never really looked at it before.

So I dug it out and started digging through it. Sure enough, I found his dog tags and his medic (red cross) armbands. Plus a Nazi armband and some medals. There are also hundreds of letters from 1941-45 I'm going to have to read and perhaps scan and save.

His discharge papers (as a Cpl) say he served in France, Central Europe, Rhineland and Africa. It also says he got 4 Bronze Stars.

I remember him telling me he was in the Battle of the Bulge and it was really bad there.

He had a tough time after the war. He worked as a Med Tech at the veterans' hospital but had mental issues, what is now called PTSD. He lived with us off and on in the 1960s and I remember being awakened with him screaming in the middle of the night. When I was in high school my dad and I had to go find him a couple times in the middle of the night after he ran off.

He coped with alcohol and eventually drank himself to death. But it was the war that killed him. It just took a lot longer.
That’s a horrible and too-often heard story. If you’ve never watched the series The Pacific, based on real Marines, one of the central characters goes through some pretty horrific PTSD after the war and sounds a lot like what your uncle suffered through. I could not imagine. Would you mind sharing what unit he was with? It should be in the top left under his name. And it sounds like he saw a ton of action. The 4 bronze stars would be affixed to his EAME ribbon to denote his participation in 4 campaigns during the war.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Again thanks for posting this. While reading this I remembered that I had a box my 93 year old mother gave me with a bunch of letters and stuff from her brother. He served as a medic (Med Tech) during WWII. She gave it to me when she moved into a senior citizen's home. I never really looked at it before.

So I dug it out and started digging through it. Sure enough, I found his dog tags and his medic (red cross) armbands. Plus a Nazi armband and some medals. There are also hundreds of letters from 1941-45 I'm going to have to read and perhaps scan and save.

His discharge papers (as a Cpl) say he served in France, Central Europe, Rhineland and Africa. It also says he got 4 Bronze Stars.

I remember him telling me he was in the Battle of the Bulge and it was really bad there.

He had a tough time after the war. He worked as a Med Tech at the veterans' hospital but had mental issues, what is now called PTSD. He lived with us off and on in the 1960s and I remember being awakened with him screaming in the middle of the night. When I was in high school my dad and I had to go find him a couple times in the middle of the night after he ran off.

He coped with alcohol and eventually drank himself to death. But it was the war that killed him. It just took a lot longer.
Also, if you’d like, I’d be happy to pull whatever research I can find on him. I have a few subscriptions to online research sites and can usually pull up articles and service-related information on veterans. That’s entirely up to you as I know privacy is a concern these days. If so, you could PM me his name and service number, and a birth/death year is also helpful.
 

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That’s a horrible and too-often heard story. If you’ve never watched the series The Pacific, based on real Marines, one of the central characters goes through some pretty horrific PTSD after the war and sounds a lot like what your uncle suffered through. I could not imagine. Would you mind sharing what unit he was with? It should be in the top left under his name. And it sounds like he saw a ton of action. The 4 bronze stars would be affixed to his EAME ribbon to denote his participation in 4 campaigns during the war.
It says Med Det 268th FA BN

I assume FA BN means Field Artillery Battalion?

He enlisted in Oct 40 and entered service in Apr 41.

Some of the documents indicates that he went through the Med Tech School at Fitszimmons General Hospital in Denver from Jan-Mar 1942.
 
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Also, if you’d like, I’d be happy to pull whatever research I can find on him. I have a few subscriptions to online research sites and can usually pull up articles and service-related information on veterans. That’s entirely up to you as I know privacy is a concern these days. If so, you could PM me his name and service number, and a birth/death year is also helpful.
I'd be delighted if you could look him up. PM incoming.
 

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Yessir, Field Artillery Battalion. I truly enjoy researching these men and women, and I’ll let you know if I can find anything!
 

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Thanks man! Commonly believed to be used to stick the notch between the teeth of servicemen who were killed in action, it’s actually just a notch that enables the stamping machine to secure a hold onto the tag
Exactly! I'm glad I'm not the only one that knows the truth.
 

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Awesome! I love that canteen. I can take some better pictures if you’d like
I would enjoy seeing more of it.
I have my grandfathers Corporals cap from his time served but sadly all of his medals were stolen in a burglary. My mom had them stored in the jewelry case he made for her.
 

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Very nice!!

Does the chip/snip at the end of the tag have any significance, or is it something that just randomly happened during it's life?
That cutout was supposedly so the dogtag could be stuck in the dead soldiers mouth to identify the body. It was designed to hook over the teeth. New tags don’t have them.
 

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Here's some stuff that was in the box with my uncles stuff in it.

Mess kit, German canteen, dogtags, Nazi armband, medic armband, German/American dictionary, overseas cap and some patches.



He also brought home a parachute which my mom made her wedding dress out of, and he brought home a DSM34 German 22 training rifle. Kind of cool stuff.
 
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That cutout was supposedly so the dogtag could be stuck in the dead soldiers mouth to identify the body. It was designed to hook over the teeth. New tags don’t have them.
That’s all actually folklore. One tag was left with the body, and one was taken by graves registration
 

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Here's some stuff that was in the box with my uncles stuff in it.

Mess kit, German canteen, dogtags, Nazi armband, medic armband, German/American dictionary, overseas cap and some patches.



He also brought home a parachute which my mom made her wedding dress out of, and he brought home a DSM34 German 22 training rifle. Kind of cool stuff.
That canteen is in excellent condition! I have one, but the felt is very frayed and the leather is dry and brittle. That’s some amazing stuff you have
 
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