concrete question

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by faceplant, Oct 12, 2015.

  1. faceplant

    faceplant

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    If a company was pouring a driveway with a 4in depth why would they use a 2x4 form which is actually 3 1/2in? Is this common in the business?
     
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  2. XDRoX

    XDRoX

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    I don't know what common is but I used 2x4's when I just did my driveway. The hole is probably a little deeper than 3 1/2 right? Are you really expecting them to cut boards to exactly 4 in for just around the edges?
     

  3. Bruce M

    Bruce M

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    I am unsure if it is common but I have some 2x4s around the edge of the wire mesh stuff at mine right now waiting for something to happen tomorrow or Wednesday that was promised to be done at the end of last week. And at the end of the week before. And sometime during the week before that. Although now I at least have places dug up and the 2x4s for a form with the wire which I am guessing is to reinforce the concrete. Or an excuse to charge more money.
     
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  4. Huaco Kid

    Huaco Kid

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    I can't give you a solid answer.
     
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  5. G30SF/F-250

    G30SF/F-250 Pinky Out Platinum Member

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    Drive the rods/stakes in the ground, nail on the 2x4, tap down rods/stakes to 4" grade.

    Much easier than marking 2x6.......
     
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  6. G30SF/F-250

    G30SF/F-250 Pinky Out Platinum Member

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    Could you give a semi set answer?
     
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  7. snappy

    snappy

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    Pouring with wire in place is a bit more labor extensive actually. Make sure the wire is suspended so that is actually in the middle of the pour. It does no good at all for the wire to be laying on the ground and pour, it's not doing a thing that way as far as reinforcement. They have little "feet" or supports that a good concrete company would provide in order to elevate the wire off the ground. 4 inch concrete is typical for a driveway pour, although my inspections call for 6 inch within town right of way where I work. Concrete needs to be poured within specs as well, don't let a fly by night contractor add a ton of water once the truck hits the jobsite as it definitely effects overall product and strength. It will be on the batch ticket from the plant how much water you can add and be within spec.
     
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  8. G30SF/F-250

    G30SF/F-250 Pinky Out Platinum Member

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    Wire is good! :thumbsup:
    Just make sure it is raised a couple inches before they pour and if you are there during the pour make sure they pull the wire up so the concrete doesn't push it all down. The point is for it to be an inch or two in the concrete to help hold it all together.
     
  9. G30SF/F-250

    G30SF/F-250 Pinky Out Platinum Member

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    You type faster than me.:supergrin:
     
  10. faceplant

    faceplant

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    What I was really expecting was an answer to my question.
     
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  11. G30SF/F-250

    G30SF/F-250 Pinky Out Platinum Member

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    That's no fun!:supergrin:
     
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  12. kiole

    kiole

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    They use a 2x4 because theyre not going to waste their time cutting down 2x6s. They probably dug the hole slightly deeper then the 2x4 so the slab will be 4+ inches thick and the very edge will be 3.5"s
     
  13. G30SF/F-250

    G30SF/F-250 Pinky Out Platinum Member

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    Better not be! I would raise hell if it was! The edges are where it needs to be true or thicker.
     
  14. Bruce M

    Bruce M

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    Is the wire good for the ~ twenty feet to extend the current twenty five year old concrete line to the sidewalk or is it good for the part that needs to bring the ~ forty feet of the twenty five year old concrete about 14" to the south so the edge is five feet instead of the just shy of four feet from the property edge that was fine for longer than a couple decades but suddenly is a substantial crisis according to the inspector? Or good for both parts?
     
  15. BSteadman

    BSteadman WidowMaker

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    This appears to be common practice. I had some sidewalks and and back outside porch deck poured two years ago and that's exactly what they did. The wire mesh was suspend up. When I ask several contractor friends about it not being what I call a true 4 inch thinkness they said that's the way they do them. As someone previously mentioned it's probably closer to 4 inches than you think. At the edge they did what I think is called a false face/edge. In other words it looks like in someplaces around the edge the concret was 6 inches thick. I found out when I was getting ready to use some anchors for my steps it wasn't thick enough. Ended up having to dig holes and several post.

    A previous poster mentioned beware of loading up the concrete with water as it weakens the strength. Definitely beware of a pour that is too wet. Curing will be everything. I was able to keep the sidewalks wet green looking for nearly a week and I don't have a single crack. Unfortunately in the back yard half my slab was exposed to intense sunlight and the other half was shaded. Yes there is a difference in cracks as it cured much more quickly.
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2015
  16. G30SF/F-250

    G30SF/F-250 Pinky Out Platinum Member

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    It's early yet but I have had a few high % beers and a shot or two of Aberlour and there are many numbers in your post that would make me want to see a blueprint to make sure I understood.

    Or I can read it again tomorrow if no one answers your question. :cheers:
     
  17. snappy

    snappy

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    Cracks are a whole nother animal in concrete. All concrete will crack, but you want to be able to control those cracks, therefore you use control joints, where the contractor will put a piece of fiberboard at various widths depending on how big the slab is. That, or come back with a concrete saw after some curing and cut control joints in. When the concrete does end up cracking, it will be at the control joints instead of just a big ugly crack developing.
     
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  18. Bruce M

    Bruce M

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    What I am certain of is when the driveway 2.0 is completed it will successfully and substantially raise not only the value of my house but the value of the other handful of houses on our street despite being located a couple blocks away from the edge of the ghetto. Well ok not really ghetto but a couple apartment buildings with fair numbers of section eight funded units (which has been essentially verified by the typical pre-rain urine stench in the stairwells.)

    :cheers:
     
  19. snappy

    snappy

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    Bruce, too many variables going on to be able to give you a good answer without actually seeing it. I will say this, if your sub grade is soft and bad material to begin with, 4 inches of concrete and wire is probably not going to help you in the long run.
     
  20. Brian Lee

    Brian Lee Drop those nuts

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    Up a tree.
    Because 3-1/2" wood is what's available cheap. And if the carpenters call it a 4" board, why can't the concrete guys call it that?

    But if it really matters to you, money can overcome the problem. In the hardwood industry, unlike the softwood industry that serves the construction market, you can buy rough sawed hardwoods in widths of exactly 4".

    So all you gotta do is offer to pay for having your concrete form made out of something nice, like Mahogany or Teak or maybe something really expensive, like African Zebra wood, and you can have it exactly 4" thick.