CNG converted Patrol units.

Discussion in 'Cop Talk' started by Birddog9, Apr 11, 2012.

  1. Birddog9

    Birddog9 ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

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    Our department is trying out some new Tahoe's which they converted to run petrol and natural gas. Anyone else using these or had any good/bad experiences with it? Had to take a 2 hour class on them and drove one momentarily and I really couldn't tell the difference running CNG or petrol. A lot of the guys seem to think its gonna flop.
     
  2. collim1

    collim1

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    Its a big commitment to make before you know if its gonna flop or not. I know our chief is turning gray worrying about fuel cost lately. I volunteer for mounted patrol.
     

  3. OLY-M4gery

    OLY-M4gery

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    "gas" mileage will be awful.

    My department had them many moons ago.

    They hated the system.

    Hated the lack of power compared to gasoline.

    Hated fueling up more than once a shift.
     
  4. DustyJacket

    DustyJacket Directiv 10-289

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    Commerce City, Colorado had CNG patrol cars, I think. You might check with them.
     
  5. Vigilant

    Vigilant

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    Check with Rocky Mount, NC police. Not sure if they still run CNG, but they did for a while at least.
     
  6. blueiron

    blueiron

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    Phoenix PD has experimented with CNG vehicles since the 1980s. For detective or admin cars, they are acceptable. For patrol units, they run about as well as a three legged dog with two club feet.

    CNG has less potential and realized power per unit of fuel than gasoline does. CNG expands in the heat and gives less of an effective charge of fuel, mixed with air in each cylinder, so less HP/torque is generated. It has worse fuel mileage and drivers almost all tend to make it worse by putting their foot into the accelerator more to try to make up for the loss of power.

    If your agency is in a cool, coastal climate year around, you'll think it is acceptable. If you work in the desert or at altitude, you will come to not like it.

    Not one Phoenix cop that I knew ever liked it.
     
  7. Cav

    Cav

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    In the mid 90's we used them in Fort Hood Texas for Ford Contours and some other vehicles I cant recall. Propane/natural gas sucked. The tank took up a bit of space in the trunk area, and switching over had some issues. Power was weak. Nothing like doing prisoner transports and funeral details in a small under powered car full of junk.

    I dont know if things are better now with natural gas, but I can see why they never caught on in Texas.

    Diesel turbo would be better IMHO.
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2012
  8. DaBigBR

    DaBigBR No Infidels!

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    They made a CNG CVPI for several years, but stopped, presumably for lack of sales. I'm not surprised to see the idea come back.
     
  9. DNA

    DNA

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    We've got them in patrol and they are dogs. They run hot and burn oil. After 50-70k they run slow and have the pickup of an econobox type vehicle. The size of the CNG tanks take up ridiculous amounts of trunk space (you lose 2/3)... On the cars with the bigger tanks good luck fitting 2 war bags and any other gear you've got.

    As stated before, they're perfect for the admin/office types, but man they suck in patrol. We've got torn up gasoline CVPIs with 140k that run better than the CNGs with under 50k...

    Dan
     
  10. Hack

    Hack Crazy CO Gold Member

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    Don't do it. Stay away from hybrids too.
     
  11. ronduke

    ronduke

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    Dallas PD tried the CNG patrol units several years ago. They had a fed. grant to pay for converting gasoline Crown Vic to CNG. From what I read, it was universally disliked by the officers. It was not repeated.
     
  12. Birddog9

    Birddog9 ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

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    Well everyone's views here seem to be right on point with what I've been hearing. Like I said I only got to drive one a few blocks and didn't have a chance to test it out yet. I probably won't get one issued for a another month or two. But Dallas was the only one I heard of who tried it and went back. But I'm on mids and average 70-80 miles a night so I'm sure I'll be at the pump atleast once per shift.
     
  13. LT642

    LT642

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    We had CNG cars for awhile, I prefer traditional gasoline vehicles made for police work. The mileage per tank is terrible, if you have to drive any distance it could be an issue. They were not as reliable as gas powered cars either.
     
  14. Glockdude1

    Glockdude1 Federal Member CLM

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    We had CNG for our patrol trucks (Ford F150's) at one time.

    Hated it. The fuel tanks only held 10 gallons. To re-fuel, you had to use a pressurized/electronic system, that once you connected the hose, switched it on, it took over. You could not add any extra fuel at or "top it off" in any way.

    You had to re-fuel every 8 hours, or risk running it out.

    Other problems started, once the trucks reached 60,000 miles. The trucks would start to over heat, hard to start, rough idle, and lack of power.

    Glad we got rid of them.

    :cool: