Cleaning a match grade rifle, corossive ammo, and cleaning.

Discussion in 'GSSF' started by alfred10, Jan 17, 2010.

  1. alfred10

    alfred10

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    How do you properly clean a match grade rifle?

    What does corrosive ammo do that makes it crossive? How do you clean after firing this ammo?
     
  2. Danny Reid

    Danny Reid

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    Hi. It really depends on the type of rifle. I have no experience with ARs, but an M1A it is recommended that you don't completely disassemble it on a routine basis, especially if it's glass bedded.

    I never used corossive rounds in mine at all. If you have used corossive rounds in your rifle, you just about have to do a complete disassembly and you'll need to soak the barrel.
     

  3. Brass Nazi

    Brass Nazi NO BRASS FOR U!

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    Corrosive ammunition contains a primer that blasts salts into the barrel and action. If these salts are left there they will absorb moisture from the air and create an ideal situation for rust to form.

    Proper cleaning technique is proper cleaning technique, whether you are cleaning a fine target rifle or a Mosin.
     
  4. raven11

    raven11

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    a tad more work than your paintball gun , alfred
     
  5. E-2-E

    E-2-E Long Trail

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  6. Jason D

    Jason D INFRINGED Silver Member Millennium Member

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    If you shoot corrosive ammo. You really need to scrub the bore with soapy water to get rid of the corrosive salts.
     
  7. G26S239

    G26S239 NRA Patron

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    Get a bucket and a funnel and boil water in a teapot and pour boiling water through the barrel several times to remove the corrosive salts then spray with electrical contact cleaner to remove the rest of the water and then use Hoppes.
     
  8. my762buzz

    my762buzz

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    How? The main thing is to avoid any damage to the chamber, bore, or most importantly the muzzle crown. Use an Otis cable cleaning kit. Clean by pulling the brush from the chamber to the muzzle.


    Firing the corrosive ammo cartridge produces residual salts because of the specific primers used in this type of ammo. The salt draws moisture from the air hygroscopically just as table salt does and that is why you see salt left in salt shakers on a table stick together and then becomes problematic in pouring through the shaker when someone tries to shake table salt onto food.
    The combination of salt and absorbed moisture from the air becomes a chemical salt bridge (galvanic cell) similar to what a battery has internally.
    If I recall correctly, the steel serves as the anode which loses electrons and Iron ions and oxygen gas O2 in the air serves as the cathode which receives electrons and Iron ions to form iron oxide which is rust. The salt bridge creates a great medium for turning virtually any metal into an oxide, and heat speeds the reaction. This same process is what allows traditional metal plating to occur like chrome or nickle plating but in reverse and oxygen is neither anode nor cathode in this case.




    Hot water dissolves salts very well and flushes them away.
    Flush the barrel, gas system, and bolt with boiling hot water.
    Dry the parts and then clean the non-salt barrel fouling as you normally would.
     
  9. jdavionic

    jdavionic NRA Member

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    On my C&R rifles that I shoot corrosive ammo, I spray the parts with Windex, including down the bore, to neutralize the salts. I then wipe off the windex (run patches through the bore) and then clean normally like I do any other gun. Been shooting corrosive ammo for a long time and never had any problems with it.
     
  10. vafish

    vafish

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    I wouldn't let that stuff in the same room as my match rifles. That GI multi-segment steel cleaning rod will ruin a match barrel very quickly.

    The proper way to clean a match rifle is to use a quality one piece cleaning rod like a Dewey. Push it only from the breach to the muzzle, remove the brush or jag and pull the rod back through the barrel and repeat. Start with a brush and copper solvent, let it sit a few minutes, then use patches until they come out clean.

    I wouldn't fire corrosive ammo in a match gun. Corrosive ammo is cheap surplus stuff. No reason for running that down the barrel of a fine match gun.
     
  11. Clem Eastwood

    Clem Eastwood

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    i dont know about corrosive ammo. but if youve got a match grade rifle id recommend:

    -a bore guide
    -a good rod (i like dewey)
    -if you use a brush, it needs to be a brass core.
    -a brass core jag
    -cleaners with ammonia are recommended to be used lightly
    -JB and flitz can take the barrel down to metal and that isnt recommended by people such as Gail McMillan, Doug Shilen and Mike Rock)

    most true match grade barrels dont foul a whole lot. so it shouldnt take much cleaning with a cleaner like hoppes or even blue wonder.

    here's a page on barrel break in that also talks about cleaners, hows and whys.

    http://www.snipercountry.com/articles/barrel_breakin_II.asp

    exactly what i was thinking.
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2010
  12. Another Miller

    Another Miller prankster

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    I agree with my762buzz.

    Start at the chamber and go forward, dont start at the muzzle and push back.You may damage the crown otherwise.


    Warm soapy water is all thats needed for corrosive ammo.then run the regular solvent through after the soapy water.

    Also, I use plastic brushes.Copper brushes get eaten up by the solvents.
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2010
  13. eisman

    eisman ARGH! CLM

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    Exactly why would you use corrosive ammo in a match rifle?
     
  14. raven11

    raven11

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    given his previous threads i doubt he owns a firearm
     
  15. mboylan

    mboylan

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    Bore guide is essential for all rifles not just match.
     
  16. Glockdude1

    Glockdude1 Federal Member CLM

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    :agree:________:rofl:
     
  17. Apocalypse_Now

    Apocalypse_Now Molon Labe

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    Hot soapy (one tablespoon of hand dishwashing detergent per qt) water poured down the bore followed by a patch/brush, I do 3 to 4 passes of hot water/brush, myself.. then I spray a good penetrating spray down the bore to protect until I can get home and use Hoppes. I use a thermos for the hot water

    Alternate field expedient is ammonia or windex and brush/patches
     
  18. Apocalypse_Now

    Apocalypse_Now Molon Labe

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    I've never used one in nearly 30 years of shooting. I clean from the chamber end or am very careful and slow from the muzzle. Rubber coated Dewey rods are also a good idea