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I've often found it interesting to see a resurrected thread pop up. You get a chance to see how folks thought of the topic at another time, seen if things changed and get a chance to talk about it again. It can often be educational. This thread for example had Taylor authoring one or two (perhaps more) articles since the OP. Interesting to see the progression and be able to talk about it a decade later.
 

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I've often found it interesting to see a resurrected thread pop up. You get a chance to see how folks thought of the topic at another time, seen if things changed and get a chance to talk about it again. It can often be educational. This thread for example had Taylor authoring one or two (perhaps more) articles since the OP. Interesting to see the progression and be able to talk about it a decade later.
Great point DeputyDave!

Mr. Taylor was someone who actually saw "the elephant" as it were. I remember reading how he shot a VC or NVA that had killed the driver of his jeep. The vehicle overturned and Taylor stayed quiet until the enemy showed himself, and Mr. Taylor and Mr. Browning's masterpiece "finished the game".

R.I.P. Sir, a man's man we all can only hope to emulate. You are and will be greatly missed!

Gray_Rider
Old Secessh
 

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My guess is environmental and/or other government regulations in the USA prevent them from using the older finishes.
This myth needs to die in a fire. The US would definitely not have stricter environmental laws than Austria, and the tennifer process is used every day in the US under different brand names. Glock went with a cheaper process because it is cheaper and almost as good.
 

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Have been searching for something for many years. Perhaps one of the denizens of this thread can assist.

Does anyone have a copy of Chuck Taylors original article comparing different handgun lubricants? Pretty sure it was in an issue of Combat Handguns printed sometime in the early 1990’s. Had a copy and lost it.

Any assistance would be greatly appreciated.
 

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This myth needs to die in a fire. The US would definitely not have stricter environmental laws than Austria, and the tennifer process is used every day in the US under different brand names. Glock went with a cheaper process because it is cheaper and almost as good.
Maybe you are right. Do you know this for sure and can point to an article? My thought there was that the guns are now produced in the USA and they had to change to comply with regulations.
 

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Have been searching for something for many years. Perhaps one of the denizens of this thread can assist.

Does anyone have a copy of Chuck Taylors original article comparing different handgun lubricants? Pretty sure it was in an issue of Combat Handguns printed sometime in the early 1990’s. Had a copy and lost it.

Any assistance would be greatly appreciated.
I took a 3-day class with him in the 80's (LFI in Danbury Connecticut) and he was using CLP Breakfree then. Just an fyi that let me brag about taking the class. :)
 

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Maybe you are right. Do you know this for sure and can point to an article? My thought there was that the guns are now produced in the USA and they had to change to comply with regulations.
Here is a company that does it in the US for car parts and heavy equipment.

https://bluewaterthermal.com/why-select-bluewater-thermal/

It is called ferritic nitrocarburizing very common in the automotive and heavy equipment industries tenifer was just the brand name glock used. Melonite like smith and wesson uses is another brand name for the same process. Now they use a gaseous process because it is cheaper and does the same thing. As for the frying pan finish on the outside that people loved that has nothing to do with tenifer its just a parkerized layer and I have no idea why they switched from it to the gen 4 finish im gonna assume because it is cheaper too.
 

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Chuck Taylors gen 2 17 definitely had some parts replacements. He commented that magazines would need to be replaced because of not locking the slide back. He also broke springs. But it was after 30,000 rounds if i'm not mistaken. Normal parts replacement/ maintainance is needed, but he used that 17 as a weapon/tool. So parts breakage is going to occur.
 

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Whatever finish Glock is using, its tough. I carried my Glock 37 gen4 for the last six years of my career with FHP. Through bad weather, range days and the firing of a couple of thousand rounds the finish is still like new. I don't believe a blued gun would have held up as well.
 
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