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chainsaw questions

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by gjk5, Jun 20, 2012.

  1. gjk5

    gjk5 Pinche Gringo

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    any of you folks knowledgeable about chainsaws?


    I just bought a share of a cabin in the mountains and the last bit of road is hairy to say the least, figured I ought to get a chainsaw.

    I was told by several folks that Stihl and Husqvarna were the "go-to" brands. Went to my buddy's pawn shop and picked up a dirty but sound Husqvarna 2007 model 137cc saw for $80.

    Gonna go take it to Ace and have it serviced and sharpened, any other advice or input?

    I think I did pretty well on price, any opinions on that?
     
  2. FatPants

    FatPants

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    Sounds like a hell of a price.

    I've got a few hundred hours behind a Stihl 026, never used a Husky, but a lot of guys swear by them.

    Buy some bar oil, and let her rip!

    Sent from my ADR6350 using Tapatalk 2
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2012

  3. wjv

    wjv Zip It Stan Lee.. . .

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    Echo is also a good brand. . .
     
  4. gjk5

    gjk5 Pinche Gringo

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    He had an Echo, looked brand new and was a 24" monster, but it was $300.

    The guy pawned it and paid on it for a year so my guy had already made his money.
     
  5. gjk5

    gjk5 Pinche Gringo

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    I can get through the road to the cabin but it is pinstriping the hell out of my truck, we are going to take the Cat up there and cut the road a little wider, but I could get 4 beds full of deadfall without stepping 3' off the road.
     
  6. Folsom_Prison

    Folsom_Prison Brew Crew

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    Id say you did pretty good!

    Go pick you up a pair of chain saw chaps, sucks wearing them when it's hotter than hell out but there has been a few times with some close calls I've had in the past, I was glad I had them on!
     
  7. FatPants

    FatPants

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    Yes, I second the chaps. They have saved my leg more than once, no doubt.

    Sent from my ADR6350 using Tapatalk 2
     
  8. bikerdog

    bikerdog

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    you got a good deal on a great saw. I still think husky makes the best saws just dont forget bar oil and some good goggles. Chaps aint a bad idea either.

    Outdoor Hub mobile, the outdoor information engine
     
  9. stevelyn

    stevelyn NRA Life Member

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    I think you did good there. Stihl and Husqvarna (Swedish built, not the Mexican built) are the go-to brands. Shindiawa is also up there with them in quality and reliability and starts and runs very well in sub-zero temps.

    Buy a couple of extra chains so you can swap them out while cutting rather than taking the extra time to sharpen them while you're working. Buy a chainsaw combo tool, keep a couple of chain files on hand, a flat file for smoothing up the bar when the chain starts grooving it and use a good 2-cycle oil like Castrol for your mix.

    Oh yeah...... a good axe, a couple wedges and a splitting maul you can hammer with because if you cut enough, you will eventually pinch the bar in a log you are cutting or a tree you are trying to fall.

    We'll get into peaveys and timberjacks later.
     
  10. robin303

    robin303 Helicopter Nut

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    Get a couple extra chains just in case. :supergrin:
     
  11. Folsom_Prison

    Folsom_Prison Brew Crew

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    Another word of advice, DO NOT be afraid to use that chain brake, kick back can be a b****! I've seen some bad stuff from saw injurys trust me.
     
  12. NDcent

    NDcent Socially Inept

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    I keep an extra chain in the box, no more than I use one I change chains instead of sharpening. I also bought a couple plastic/polymer wedges, I'm always pinching the bar. :embarassed:

    ETA: Yeah, what they said above.. :supergrin:
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2012
  13. Gonzoso

    Gonzoso

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    You folks talking about swapping chains when one gets dull must not know how to hand sharpen a saw.

    The best way to sharpen a saw is using hand files. You need a round file for your specific blade, and a flat file for the rakers.

    You file evenly counting the strokes on each side, one side at a time. It takes me all of 3-5 minutes to get a blade back to like new condition, 5-7 if I have to take down the rakers.

    This is much more efficient than having to take the bar off all the time. I was running my 025 all day today, I must have touched up my blade 3 times because I was cutting up stumps and nasty dead wood.

    What kills the average homeowner saw is letting the saw sit. Use your saw regularly, and drain the gas when you're not using it for a long time. Only mix as much gas as you can use in a month or three so it doesn't got bad on you.

    DON'T take your blade to the hack with the power sharpener.

    If you wanna use a saw learn how to hand sharpen.
     
  14. larry_minn

    larry_minn Silver Member Millennium Member

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    Have to agree about old gas. My saw needs work because of lack of use. :( I started using electric saws.

    For what I do they are great. I have a pole saw and can cut high branchs from ground. Then use electic saw to limb if needed. No mix gas/oil or have to start. A quality 100' 12 guage cord and I can reach most places.

    I had a jig to sharpen chain on saw. It kept proper angle with round file, had thing for rakers. Or course I don't use electric enough to need that. Big jobs I just call folks who burn wood and they are thrilled to do job.
     
  15. Hummer

    Hummer Big Member

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    A 137cc Husky? What're you going to do, cut down a whole forest of Redwood trees? :supergrin:

    But, if it's a model 137 with a 36cc engine with like a 16 inch bar, it'll be easy to handle for smaller trees and limbing. You did OK if it runs well. Ride it like a bar chick until she wears out!

    If you end up cutting larger spruce, white fir and Douglas fir, eventually you'll want a bigger saw. Seriously consider a pro grade Stihl or Husqvarna. I have and like both brands they're worth every penny. More power, smoother running, higher revs, more work for less effort, longer lasting and more reliable. You won't find them at Ace or the big box stores.

    Go to Western Implement when they have their spring sale. It's the best saw shop in town.
     
  16. Snaps

    Snaps Hail 2 The King

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    Great price, I've had good luck with Stihls but for years when I worked for a tree service we used Huskys or Eco and they always worked great. And yea, if you're gonna be out doing a lot of stuff, get spare chains, it's a lot quicker to swap a chain than sharpen one.
     
  17. toshbar

    toshbar Timber Baron

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    Keep the chain out of dirt at all costs. Dirt and lightwood will kill a chain faster than anything.
     
  18. SmokeRoss

    SmokeRoss GTDS Member #49

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    I think most people buy too small of a saw, then have to work harder to get the job done. My smallest saw is 57cc's. My current largest is 120cc's, the Husky 3120 with a 42" bar. Had several Stihl 090's but sold them for big money. My largest Stihl currently is 111cc's. My go to saw is my Stihl MS460 with a 28" bar. Up until recently I had over 30 large saws in my garage. I have thinned the herd since, but it was mostly the smaller ones that went away. I agree with other posters about the safety gear, especially eye and ear protection. And yes, learn how to file your own chain. It's not that hard. Helps to have a good vice, even if it's one of those $10 stump vices.
     
  19. Folsom_Prison

    Folsom_Prison Brew Crew

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    For the record keep your saw out of the dirt and your chain should stay fairly sharp for a while unless your cutting alot of dead wood or hit a fence and such.