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Nice guy
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Discussion Starter #1
sub vs compact vs full? caliber vs different caliber?

Does the dual recoil spring help or hurt the chances?
 

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My guess would be that the Glock is the lightest pistol of the whole bunch making it harder for the action to cycle.
 

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Don't believe everything you see. I've done that with my G19, supposedly the most notorious Glock to fail from limpwristing, not a single malfunction. I personally think this person is an anti-glocker and probably has a super stiff aftermarket recoil spring in the gun (who knows what other mods where made). I'll believe it, when I can get my very own Glock to do that.
 

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Don't believe everything you see. I've done that with my G19, supposedly the most notorious Glock to fail from limpwristing, not a single malfunction. I personally think this person is an anti-glocker and probably has a super stiff aftermarket recoil spring in the gun (who knows what other mods where made). I'll believe it, when I can get my very own Glock to do that.
Don't think he's anti glock.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mrZ0kxhDA3Y
 

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My guess would be that the Glock is the lightest pistol of the whole bunch making it harder for the action to cycle.
That's not an excuse for a reliability flaw. A reason, maybe, but one that should have been addressed in this *combat* handgun's design.

Now, I've not had a LW failure that I know of, and darn few for any reason. But, when I see the "It's the operator, not the gun' fault," reply to posts about various cycling failures, I'm always tempted to ask, shouldn't more tolerance of operator grip be the hallmark of a "reliable" combat handgun?

Now, I don't know if there is enough empirical evidence accumulated to lay that charge on Glock's design, and I certainly don't hesitate to rely on mine, but, I think it's a legitimate concern. I mean, think about it. What would you say to someone who said that they've got a great handgun that's very reliable--as long as you use the right ammo, grip it tightly, and keep the springs fresh?

K
 

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Maybe your right. I think I may have tested like that with +P ammo, perhaps that made a difference in mine. Now I'm gonna go back and re-test mine for the limpwrist. That being said, I'm not worried about a limpwrist failure, even when I practice shooting from the hip (one handed), I have no problems with my Glock, at all, and I practice like that every time I'm at the range.
 

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What would you say to someone who said that they've got a great handgun that's very reliable--as long as you use the right ammo, grip it tightly, and keep the springs fresh?
Possibly excluding the grip comment I think you just named every handgun out there.

I'm not completely convinced in a normal situation that limp wristing is a viable excuse for a failure. You can find videos of little kids shooting Glocks on youtube with the gun recoiling quite a bit with it still functioning.
 

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Every time I see someone in one of these threads discredit the "operator error" claim and instead fault the weapon I am always tempted to ask to what point should a manufacturer develop a gun to be 100% "fool-proof".

A manufacturer cannot design and build a device--any device--to be 100% operational independent of the operator. It is ridiculous to expect such. When an operator of a motorcycle crashes the motorcycle due to improper operation of the device, does that mean that the motorcycle manufacturer did not do a good job of designing and building the motorcycle when 10,000 other riders operate the vehicle "reliably"? Of course not.

The term "reliable" explains that if the device is operated in the intended and designed-for manner it will function as it is designed to function (a blender will not send a fax no matter how "properly" you operate it) as near to 100% of the time as can be expected of an imperfect item produced by an imperfect builder.

Honestly, even most sane anti-GLOCK folks may knock the GLOCK's looks or grip angle or lack of thumb safety, etc., but rarely will a sane, knowledgeable gun owner discredit GLOCK's "reliability".

Most likely, ANY semi-automatic handgun can be limp-wristed and create a failure if one applies themselves enough to the "task". Having said that, I believe a more powerful load in a lighter firearm will lend itself to a greater tendency to provoke limp-wristing. This reasoning leads me to believe that the sub-compacts, especially the 10mm and .40 iterations, are more likely to be susceptible to limp-wrist failures. I have heard that this can be a problem with the GLOCK 36 as well as it is, again, a lighter weapon with a heavier load. I have not had it happen with mine, however, my first time out with it I did have a couple of FTFeeds that I know were attributable to a lighter grip on the weapon than is required.
 

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I have owned a Glock 19 and currently own a Glock 26 that both had failures from limp wristing.

When I first got my G19, I shot it holding it very relaxed and had a few FTE's.

I took my girlfriend shooting with my G26 a couple weeks ago and it had two or three FTE's before I told her to change her grip and control the recoil more. She was letting it snap up quite a bit, it had been awhile since she had shot before. There were no problems after her first dozen shots.

Both times it was with cheap practice ammo (the G19 was WWB and the G26 was with Monarch blue box). Both of those seem to be pretty soft shooting rounds, and I've never had a failure shooting any of my Federal HST or other sd rounds (which all feel a bit hotter, although regular pressure).

I love my Glocks and don't plan on buying any other brand (other than maybe a Ruger LCP), but the limp wrist failures are a bit of a disappointment. I put my trust in them, but I'm only 99% thrilled with Glock.
 

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Strange. I remember firing my first Glock (23) at the range with my friend, and he brought his mother (who's not really into guns), just to show her it's nothing bad. We all fired the pistol, and it didn't jam, FTF or FTE once. She was holding it pretty light too, because I noticed it. He corrected her, but before that correction, there were no "limp wristing" FTE's whatsoever.

Makes me wonder why? Is it a certain make? Maybe Glock sent out a big batch that weren't "tuned" correctly, but others were? It's not a universal Glock problem, because it would've happened to us if that were true... but it didn't.

I wouldn't blame others for not liking that though; I wouldn't like it either! I mean, you can imagine some worst case scenario, like if you're dazed after getting punched in the face a few times (especially if you're a woman getting hit by a man) and you can't exactly get the "perfect grip" on the handle... ? But, again, I've not had any problems myself, so... I don't understand the issue. I guess it's like the kB! issue, huh? No one knows when, why or how it happens; but it happens to some, and not to others. :dunno:
 

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I'm new to Glock Talk as well as owning handguns. I've seen a fair amount of talk about this "limp wristing." What I don't understand is, even in a shoot from the hip situation, I don't really understand nor have seen anyone hold a gun with two fingers and their thumb and try to fire except for these videos. I may not know much but it seems the Glocks reliability through torture testing is a much better test of the guns actual performance vs. a (what I consider) very unlikely situation. For most gun owners it seems to me that before considering using it for home/personal defense, they would put plenty of rounds through a particular handgun and become thoroughly familiar with it.

I am weighing purchasing a Glock or a Springfield and have never once been disuaded by the "Limp Wrist" test. It just seems impractical and an unrealistic test based on a tactical/personal defense situation.

So my question is, is this actually a legitimate test of any kind or just a general statement of fact that if you shoot this gun improperly and unsafely that isn't going to function properly? Is there anyone out there even without the proper instruction that could within 50 rounds of firing the gun be corrected to handle the recoil to eliminate possible FTEs? As well as a possible built in safety for someone not properly trained that may accidentally/ or potentially with harmful intent come into possesion of the gun and try and fire it only to find it doesn't eject after one round and then not know what to do?

I took out a police trade in G22 about two weeks ago and have very limited rounds through it (about 20.) It may sound stupid but in all searching for my first handgun I ran across a video instruction on an effective combat grip. Without having fired a handgun in about a year, I took the gun out, felt better and more safe as well as more accurate after watching that 3 minute video than in 3 or four years of intruction at a younger age. I just want to know if there is a good answer to this limp wristing issue.
 

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I'm new to Glock Talk as well as owning handguns. I've seen a fair amount of talk about this "limp wristing." What I don't understand is, even in a shoot from the hip situation, I don't really understand nor have seen anyone hold a gun with two fingers and their thumb and try to fire except for these videos. I may not know much but it seems the Glocks reliability through torture testing is a much better test of the guns actual performance vs. a (what I consider) very unlikely situation. For most gun owners it seems to me that before considering using it for home/personal defense, they would put plenty of rounds through a particular handgun and become thoroughly familiar with it.
:agree:

I don't believe this test has any merit.
 

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It's not a reliability flaw. It's user error. Anything approximating a proper grip and stance will prevent limp wristing. Heavier guns are simply more forgiving of poor technique and lack of skill. Their greater mass gives them a higher tendency for the object at rest to stay at rest relative to the recoil of a round being fired. Absent a properly trained shooter, the lighter glock has less mass, and therefore less tendency to remain at rest- it is more susceptible to crappy technique. This has no affect on anyone using a solid grip and stance.

That's not an excuse for a reliability flaw. A reason, maybe, but one that should have been addressed in this *combat* handgun's design.

Now, I've not had a LW failure that I know of, and darn few for any reason. But, when I see the "It's the operator, not the gun' fault," reply to posts about various cycling failures, I'm always tempted to ask, shouldn't more tolerance of operator grip be the hallmark of a "reliable" combat handgun?

Now, I don't know if there is enough empirical evidence accumulated to lay that charge on Glock's design, and I certainly don't hesitate to rely on mine, but, I think it's a legitimate concern. I mean, think about it. What would you say to someone who said that they've got a great handgun that's very reliable--as long as you use the right ammo, grip it tightly, and keep the springs fresh?

K
 

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i'm sure Glock is going to come out with the new"Limpwrist" model,:rofl:....if this was an issue with the company they would of been on it faster than a speeding bullet. To manyGlock contracts & they would drop them in a blink of an eye if they had such a reputation.
 
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