CDC removes guidance saying coronavirus spreads through air

Discussion in 'Covid-19 News/Info' started by Mr981, Sep 21, 2020.

  1. Lampshade

    Lampshade

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    You seem confused. I have made no assertion about how Covid is or isn't capable of spreading.

    I was pointing you in the direction of understanding airborne vs droplet transmission because your post questioning how people could contract it via choir practice if not spread by air shows that you did not grasp the distinction.
     
  2. DonGlock26

    DonGlock26

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    But, it's Jill's turn to be first lady.
     

  3. OttoLoader

    OttoLoader

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    So the cdc yet again put out some vague and scary guidelines. Then retracted it.

    This is why I have tuned tune them out since about mid April.

    I suggest getting real advice from a real doctor or expert not by the media and general vague reports.
     
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2020
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  4. Mr981

    Mr981

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    Update on 10/5:
    https://news.yahoo.com/cdc-admits-covid-19-spread-211400081.html

    Apparently the CDC reversed the reversal, saying small particles can spread the virus farther than 6' from the spreader and can linger in the air for hours. The caveat is this isn't typical way it is spread--or so they say now.

    When the CDC does a 180 twice on the same data, my faith in the accuracy of of the their statements diminishes greatly. Are they that inept or is this all politics at work?
     
  5. MaxxAction

    MaxxAction

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    The physics of this don't work...

    A droplet cannot survive for hours in a space that is air conditioned or heated. It won't survive for more than a few minutes, and most likely will hit the ground in seconds. The moisture portion of that droplet will be absorbed into the air, or fall to the ground , typically within seconds, leaving the virus to die in a short amount of time.

    Now if someone is walking down an aisle in a store sneezing every 5 feet, and you are walking right behind them and walking through their spray, there may be a slight chance of inhaling enough to get infected, but in general, I think they are full of ****, and playing fear politics.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. Taz

    Taz

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    I tend to agree about the fear mongering, but the physics of micro droplets aren’t the same as those posted in your diagram. Those are rather large droplets at 20 to 200 micron diameter. I believe that these micro droplets are in the single digit micron dia, which tend to float about considerably more. Again, in UN ventilated spaces these could linger, but not many of those spaces exist in the USA. Around the world where AC isn’t a thing it may be an issue. How many of these micro droplets cause infection???

    Question. These cheap POS paper masked folks are wearing that allow you to breath through them to moisten your fingers to open those crazy veggie bags at the grocery store. Are they breaking up larger particles of moisture as they pass through the fibers of the mask??
     
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  7. MaxxAction

    MaxxAction

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    I am sure the smaller droplets will "float" more freely...

    but a droplet that small has almost no volume to hold it together, especially in Air conditioned, heated, or outdoor spaces, it's going to dissipate fairly quickly. If it was a highly humid space (95% humidity for example) with no air movement or ventilation, maybe.

    Like I said, if you are walking through a direct spray of someone's sneeze, that's one thing. But to have a droplet so small linger in the air for hours defies the reality of how things actually work. Someone just breathing is not exhaling enough of anything to be a significant threat. A cough can put out some significant amounts of moisture exhalation, and a sneeze more so. Honestly I have not heard anyone sneeze in public anywhere I have been since this whole thing started.

    As to the masks, I think the only thing it's going to protect against is someone sneezing or coughing in your face.