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Cat problem! Help!!!!

Discussion in 'Woof Memorial Critter's Corner' started by MrsKitty, Apr 18, 2007.

  1. MrsKitty

    MrsKitty

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    Peachie, other longtime kitty owners help!

    Our first kitty was Missy. We have had her about ten years now. We got our second kitty, Fred about six years ago. Not a single problem.

    Three years ago, we rescued Iggy (female). Missy *hates* her. Iggy is a meek and timid little girl. She was abused pretty badly before we got her. We know nothing about her past as she just showed up at my uncle's house one day. Hoping she would go back to where she came from, we waited six months then took her in. Once she was in, we could tell that she was house-broken, and abused by how she acted. She *is* litter box trained.

    The only iffy thing about her is whether or not she was ever spayed. Our vet couldn't find a scar, but she was estimated to be 8-12 months old when we got her. I would guess closer to 10 as she had been outside for the six months. She has never went into heat nor did she have a litter during that time so we (including the vet) think she was spayed. The only way to know for sure would be to cut her and that is pretty drastic. If she ever does go into heat, our vet will work her in that very day as he also felt she has been spayed and didn't want to put her thru the surgery just to check.

    Six months ago, we rescued Itty Bitty (female). Nothing has changed with her so she is not the problem.

    Missy absolutely is refusing to be civil to Iggy. She has went so far as to stand stretched out over the litter box to keep her out of it when she needs to go when the people who live here can see it! We bought a second box and Missy has laid claim to it, too! Before you people say we need at least three boxes, these are the LitterMaid boxes so they are always "clean" when somebody wants them. I really don't think it would change things if we had a dozen in the house as it is an Alpha thing.

    Our next tactic is going to be locking Missy up in the bathroom all day long with a litter box and water dish. She can't keep the others out of the boxes if she is confined. At first we considered locking her up in my bedroom but I decided that isn't fair to the others who sleep in my bed. (Missy will not allow Iggy to cross the threshold coming in here either)

    I don't think hitting her with a blast of water will be very effective as she LOVES water. She sits in the shower and asks for a bath. When I spray my hair she hoovers wanting to be spritzed in the face.

    Does anybody have any other suggestions?
     
  2. ATL Peach Girl

    ATL Peach Girl ♥Meezers♥

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    Have you talked to the vet?? After all these years Missy is still not taking to Iggy......

    Yes it sounds like Missy *is* the alpha female and she is just letting Iggy know she is.....she can sense that Iggy is subservient toward her......

    This is what *I* would do, I would swat Missy with a rolled up newspaper (I don't like to hit my cats, but they do get swatted lightly when they act up) or maybe try swatting your hand with the magazine or newspaper yelling "No Missy!!"....course this could alarm and scare Iggy too.......ugh. Poor Iggy. It's a no win situation.

    I have been really lucky because Max never has and never did lash out toward Milo (both males) and readily accepted him. Last year I was dating a guy and he brought his 10 month old kitten over and neither one of my boys made too much of a fuss, both were more curious over her but not hissing, and it was her that hissed, growled and crouched in the corner. In fact Milo wanted to play with her.

    On CatFancy magazine's website you can write to the vets and ask them. Lots of behavioral questions do come up. I am not sure how long it would take for them to answer you though. Months and months I am thinking. (www.CatFancy.com)

    Have you thought about hitting your local library??? There HAS to be books out there on cat behavior, agression and getting cats to accept other cats in your house.........

    Man, I am sorry it is like this for you........
     

  3. Blitzer

    Blitzer Cool Cat

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    After my Goldie came into heat the first time Precious started to smack her, growl and chase her randomly. Prior to that they were not aggressive toward each other, Goldie does try to be civil without much success. I can drown Precious and Goldie without any effect other than dirty looks from both of them.
    :shocked:

    I guess I need to get Goldie fixed. Goldie does make her own bed by sneaking up on Precious while she is asleep and thumping her on the noggin. :rofl:

    Goldie was a late bloomer and didn't go into heat until she was 9 months old. Goldie and Iggy probably "smells" like an adult females.

    If Iggy doesn't have a scar she is still complete.
     
  4. sdsnet

    sdsnet NRA Member CLM

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    Two female cats in the same house can definitely be a problem. I have had an alpha female repeatedly harrass and beat up a smaller female and there wasn't really anything we could do about it. We kept them separated and it helped until we moved down the street and in the new house the alpha apparently chased our little female away and we never saw her again. As the other poster said, I would ask a vet or a behavioral specialist of some sort. I wish we would have done something so we didn't lose our "yoyo kitty" years ago. We have two males now and they get along well although they wrestle every day and sometimes get rough, but no hissing and only occasional yelping from one when he gets mad. I think the males enjoy wrestling. I also had a problem with two female cats in the same house when I was a kid. It sounds like you are on the right track asking others what to do. I hope you find a solution.
     
  5. pjrocco

    pjrocco Rock

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    I had a similar problem with my female when we got our other two rescues. She would attack the other two while they were trying to use the box and she was just down right mean. Which is odd because the boys are at least twice her size. I put up three boxes and had them all in different locations. When the boys would use the box she would run for whatever box they were in. I would follow and get as close as I could to her and hiss. After about two weeks of this she finally started to leave them alone. When I wasn't home I would keep them apart. It is supposed to show that you are alpha and they are all below you. Some cats will except that you are alpha and all other cats are equal, but then some will try to create a pecking order below you.

    On the flip side, some cats will never get along. It is like humans, there are people that you just can't stand, can stand and like. Cats are the same way, and you may never be able to fix it.

    Good luck!
     
  6. G20man32904

    G20man32904 Deceased

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    MK,
    Try white vinegar and water mix, 50/50 and squirt missy in the face, eyes when she is trying to be dominant. Since she will do it in front of you, why don't you put her on a leash? Cats think the same way dogs do, in terms of a hierarchy. You can also feeed Missy last, and have her on leash while the others eat first.

    This really is something that can be fixed, but you need to become the Alpha female here. :wavey: :hugs:
     
  7. MrsKitty

    MrsKitty

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    Hmm...I hadn't thought of that! She has a harness. Maybe it is time to jerk her chain! :supergrin:

    I will get some cheap vinegar. A blast of balsamic, even half stregnth, would make her a sticky mess. Then again, if she spent her day licking it off, she wouldn't have time to hog the box :rofl:

    We are all back to drinking out of the water bowl now. The only other options are the toilet and licking up drops after somebody showers. No more squabbles for food and no more sitting by the bathroom sink demanding water.

    Iggy is just so timid and meek. The rest ignore Missy and her crap but not Iggy :sad:

    I am goint to start segregating her while we are away too. Between that, the vinegar/water and a leash she ought to get the point.

    We tried for several years to break Missy from biting. Finally, we started biting her ear when she bit us. After a few times, she would lay her ears down flat against her head while she debated if it was worth being bit back or not. She only stopped biting all humans when we got her a kitten as the vet had been telling us to do for several years (he was highly amused at biting her back when I told him what we were doing and how it was working!).

    Thanks all! :wavey:
     
  8. G20man32904

    G20man32904 Deceased

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    MK,
    Try white vinegar. Works well and isn't a big mess, however Missy will be smelling like an anti-pasta for awhile :supergrin: .

    Try the leash and I'll bet within 4-6 days she will come around.
     
  9. sdsnet

    sdsnet NRA Member CLM

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    I read that if you use negative reinforcement when a cat is showing aggression toward another that it can sometimes make the situation worse. I'm no expert but just something I read, no link unfortunately.
     
  10. MrsKitty

    MrsKitty

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    She will or else! :supergrin:

    The little 10 lb heathen thinks she can rule the roost...HA! :upeyes:
     
  11. Stillhuntn

    Stillhuntn

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    I recently had a similar situation with the aggression between two males. The larger of the two was the first in the house. The older is more laid back and would not defend himself. Water did not seem to work. We used compressed air, the stuff for cleaning inside of computers and the like. The sound is similar to a hissing cat and the air catches them off guard. That calmed things down until they worked it out.
    Your vet should be able to x-ray Iggy and tell if she has been spayed.
    Someone mentioned you have to be the alpha female in the house. With my big male I have to do that occassionally when he is in bully mode. It does work.
    I hope you get this resolved.
    Rick
     
  12. Blitzer

    Blitzer Cool Cat

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    Take Iggy to a different vet for an examination.


    X-rays don't show internal organs by the way but an MRI will.

    :supergrin: :thumbsup: ;)
     
  13. MrsKitty

    MrsKitty

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    Compressed air... A can of air freshner sprayed in the center of the room terrifies them. What a simple idea! Thanks!
     
  14. MrsKitty

    MrsKitty

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    We didn't think it was really necessary to go any further with Iggy. She has only been out of this house once twice since she was brought in. Both times were trips to the vet. She was terrified to go out each time. Other than being so timid and meek, she is great. She doesn't have any health problems and whether or not she is actually spayed hasn't really been an issue.

    Does anybody think it is really necessary to find out? If we thought it really mattered, it wouldn't be a problem but the process of just being carried to the vet is extremely traumatic for her. Her personality has also played into the vet's recommendations.

    Another vet is out of the question. We love our vet. We have been with him a long time. I can call him at home anytime if I think something may be going on he needs to know about before morning. In an emergency, he is incredible. Missy had complications after she was spayed and declawed. He saw her multiple times without charging or having an appointment in addition to dealing with a ton of my stupid questions (she was too damn stubborn to use a litter box without real litter in it which caused her problems).Our animals love him. Hell, I would use him as my own GP if he would treat humans! :supergrin:
     
  15. btcglockgirl

    btcglockgirl

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    I have a similar problem with my cat Brat (and yes, she deserves the name). We have tried multiple times to bring in other animals- kittens, dogs, etc. She blocked one kitten under the couch, so it was afraid to come out and did its business under there. She wouldn't tolerate a dog either. We have a few cats in the neighborhood and when they are outside our house, we know because she is growling and hissing histerically in the window sill. We have given up completely on bringing any other living thing into our house. She is an "only child" so to speak. Very teritorial.